Table of Contents Title 28 EDUCATION Part CXI. Bulletin 118― Statewide Assessment Standards and Practices Chapter 1. General Provisions.................................................................................................................... 1 § 101. Purpose........................................................................................................................ ............. 1 § 103. Overview....................................................................................................................... ........... 1 § 105. Testing and Accountability....................................................................................................... 1 § 107. Assessment Programs ............................................................................................................... 1 § 109. Assessment Populations............................................................................................................ 2 § 111. Limitations on Public Release of Assessment Data.................................................................. 3 Chapter 3. Test Security ............................................................................................................................. 3 § 301. Participation.................................................................................................................. ........... 3 § 303. Definitions ............................................................................................................................... 3 § 305. Test Security Policy.................................................................................................................. 3 § 307. Change of District Test Coordinator Notification .................................................................... 8 § 309. Erasure Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 8 § 311. Addressing Suspected Violations of Test Security and Troubling Content in Written Responses ( Constructed Responses, Short Answers, and Essays) ........................................... 8 § 312. Administrative Error ................................................................................................................. 9 § 313. Viewing Answer Documents .................................................................................................. 10 § 315. Emergencies during Testing ................................................................................................... 10 § 316. Cell Phones and Other Electronic Devices ............................................................................. 11 § 317. Virtual Charter Schools .......................................................................................................... 11 § 319. E- mail Addresses for Nonpublic and Public School Test Coordinators................................. 12 Chapter 5. Test Coordinator Responsibilities........................................................................................... 12 Subchapter A. District Test Coordinator ................................................................................................... 12 § 501. District Test Coordinator Role................................................................................................ 12 Subchapter B. School Test Coordinator .................................................................................................... 13 § 511. School Test Coordinator Role................................................................................................. 13 Chapter 7. Assessment Program Overview.............................................................................................. 14 § 701. Overview of Assessment Programs in Louisiana ................................................................... 14 Chapter 9. Kindergarten Developmental Readiness Screening Program................................................. 15 § 901. Statement of Purpose .............................................................................................................. 15 § 903. Definitions .............................................................................................................................. 15 § 905. Target Population.................................................................................................................... 15 § 907. Agency Administrative Participation...................................................................................... 15 § 909. State BESE- Approved Instruments ........................................................................................ 15 Chapter 11. Louisiana Educational Assessment Program ...................................................................... 16 Subchapter A. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 16 § 1101. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 16 Subchapter B. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards.............................................................. 16 § 1113. Achievement Levels ............................................................................................................... 16 § 1115. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 16 Subchapter C. LEAP Achievement Level Descriptors .............................................................................. 17 § 1125. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 17 § 1127. Grade 4 Achievement Level Descriptors................................................................................ 17 § 1129. Grade 8 Achievement Level Descriptors................................................................................ 20 Table of Contents Subchapter D. LEAP Assessment Structure .............................................................................................. 22 § 1141. Content Standards ................................................................................................................... 22 § 1143. English Language Arts Tests Structure .................................................................................. 23 § 1145. Mathematics Tests Structure................................................................................................... 23 § 1147. Science Tests Structure........................................................................................................... 24 § 1149. Social Studies Tests Structure................................................................................................. 24 § 1151. Retests and Rescores............................................................................................................... 25 § 1153. Transfer Students .................................................................................................................... 25 § 1155. Student Membership Determination....................................................................................... 26 Chapter 13. Graduation Exit Examination.............................................................................................. 26 Subchapter A. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 26 § 1301. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 26 Subchapter B. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards.............................................................. 26 § 1311. Achievement Levels ............................................................................................................... 26 § 1313. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 27 Subchapter C. GEE Achievement Level Descriptors ................................................................................ 27 § 1323. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 27 § 1325. Grade 10 Achievement Level Descriptors.............................................................................. 27 § 1327. Grade 11 Achievement Level Descriptors.............................................................................. 28 Subchapter D. GEE Assessment Structure ................................................................................................ 30 § 1335. Content Standards ................................................................................................................... 30 § 1337. English Language Arts Tests Structure .................................................................................. 30 § 1339. Mathematics Tests Structure................................................................................................... 31 § 1341. Science Test Structure ............................................................................................................ 31 § 1343. Social Studies Tests Structure................................................................................................. 32 § 1345. Double Jeopardy Rule............................................................................................................. 32 § 1347. First and Second Cohorts........................................................................................................ 32 § 1348. Last Cohorts........................................................................................................................ ... 33 § 1349. Rescores ............................................................................................................................... .. 33 § 1351. GEE Administration Rules .................................................................................................... 33 § 1353. Summer Retest Administration............................................................................................... 33 § 1355. GEE Transfer Students ........................................................................................................... 34 § 1357. Student Membership Determination....................................................................................... 35 Chapter 15. Norm- Referenced Tests ...................................................................................................... 35 § 1501. Description.................................................................................................................... ......... 35 Chapter 17. Integrated LEAP.................................................................................................................. 35 Subchapter A. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 35 § 1700. Sunset Provision ..................................................................................................................... 35 § 1701. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 35 Subchapter B. iLEAP Test Design ............................................................................................................ 35 § 1703. Format......................................................................................................................... ........... 35 Subchapter C. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards.............................................................. 36 § 1705. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 36 § 1707. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 36 Subchapter D. iLEAP Achievement Level Descriptors............................................................................. 37 § 1709. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 37 § 1711. Grade 3 Achievement Level Descriptors................................................................................ 37 § 1713. Grade 5 Achievement Level Descriptors................................................................................ 40 § 1715. Grade 6 Achievement Level Descriptors................................................................................ 43 § 1717. Grade 7 Achievement Level Descriptors................................................................................ 46 § 1719. Grade 9 Achievement Level Descriptors................................................................................ 50 Table of Contents Subchapter E. iLEAP Assessment Structure ............................................................................................. 51 § 1721. Content Standards ................................................................................................................... 51 § 1723. English Language Arts Tests Structure .................................................................................. 52 § 1725. Math Tests Structure............................................................................................................... 53 § 1727. Science Tests Structure........................................................................................................... 53 § 1729. Social Studies Tests Structure................................................................................................. 54 Chapter 18. End- of- Course Tests............................................................................................................ 54 Subchapter A. Background ........................................................................................................................ 54 § 1801. Overview....................................................................................................................... ......... 54 Subchapter B. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 55 § 1803. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 55 § 1804. EOCT Development and Implementation Plan [ Formerly § 1805]......................................... 55 Subchapter C. EOC Test Design................................................................................................................ 55 § 1805. Algebra I Test Structure [ Formerly 1807] .............................................................................. 55 § 1806. Biology Test Structure [ Formerly § 1808] .............................................................................. 55 § 1807. English II Test Structure [ Formerly § 1809] ........................................................................... 56 § 1808. Geometry Test Structure [ Formerly § 1810] ........................................................................... 56 § 1809. U. S. History Test Structure..................................................................................................... 56 § 1810. English III Test Structure........................................................................................................ 56 Subchapter D. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards.............................................................. 57 § 1811. EOCT Achievement Levels .................................................................................................... 57 § 1813. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 57 Subchapter E. Achievement Level Descriptors ......................................................................................... 57 § 1815. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 57 § 1817. EOCT Achievement Level Descriptors .................................................................................. 57 Subchapter F. EOCT Administrative Rules............................................................................................... 60 § 1819. Double Jeopardy Rule............................................................................................................. 60 § 1821. First Cohort ............................................................................................................................. 60 § 1823. Rescores ............................................................................................................................... .. 60 § 1825. EOC Administration Rules ..................................................................................................... 60 § 1827. EOC Retest Administration .................................................................................................... 61 § 1829. EOC Transfer Rules................................................................................................................ 61 § 1831. College and Career Diploma................................................................................................... 61 Chapter 19. LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 ................................................................................. 61 Subchapter A. Background ........................................................................................................................ 61 § 1900. Sunset Provision ..................................................................................................................... 61 § 1901. Overview....................................................................................................................... ......... 61 Subchapter B. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 61 § 1903. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 61 Subchapter C. Target Population ............................................................................................................... 62 § 1905. Participation Criteria............................................................................................................... 62 Subchapter D. LAA 1 Test Design ............................................................................................................ 62 § 1907. Test Structure...................................................................................................................... ... 62 § 1909. Scoring........................................................................................................................ ........... 62 Subchapter E. Alternate Achievement Levels and Performance Standards .............................................. 62 § 1911. LAA 1 Alternate Achievement Levels ................................................................................... 62 § 1913. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 62 Subchapter F. Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors ......................................................................... 63 § 1915. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 63 § 1917. Grade Span 3- 4 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors.................................................... 63 § 1919. Grade Span 5- 6 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors.................................................... 63 § 1921. Grade Span 7- 8 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors.................................................... 64 Table of Contents § 1923. Grade Span 9- 10 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors.................................................. 65 § 1925. LAA 1 Science Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors .................................................... 66 Chapter 20. LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 ................................................................................. 67 Subchapter A. Background ........................................................................................................................ 67 § 2000. Sunset Provision ..................................................................................................................... 67 § 2001. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 67 Subchapter B. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards.............................................................. 68 § 2005. Achievement Levels ............................................................................................................... 68 § 2007. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 68 Subchapter C. Achievement Level Descriptors......................................................................................... 69 § 2009. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 69 § 2017. Grade 10 Achievement Level Descriptors.............................................................................. 69 § 2019. Grade 11 Achievement Level Descriptors.............................................................................. 70 Subchapter D. LAA 2 Assessment Structure ............................................................................................. 71 § 2021. Content Standards ................................................................................................................... 71 § 2023. English Language Arts Tests Structure .................................................................................. 72 § 2025. Mathematics Test Structure .................................................................................................... 72 § 2027. Science Tests Structure........................................................................................................... 72 § 2029. Social Studies Tests Structure................................................................................................. 73 § 2031. Double Jeopardy Rule............................................................................................................. 73 § 2033. Rescores ............................................................................................................................... .. 73 § 2035. LAA 2 High School Assessment Administration Rules......................................................... 74 § 2037. Summer Retest Administration............................................................................................... 74 § 2041. Student Membership Determination....................................................................................... 74 Chapter 21. National Assessment of Educational Progress .................................................................... 75 § 2101. General Provisions.................................................................................................................. 75 § 2103. Inclusions and Accommodations ............................................................................................ 75 Chapter 22. ACT Program...................................................................................................................... 75 § 2201. Background..................................................................................................................... ....... 75 § 2203. EXPLORE .............................................................................................................................. 75 § 2205. PLAN........................................................................................................................... .......... 75 § 2207. ACT ............................................................................................................................... ........ 76 § 2209. WorkKeys ............................................................................................................................... 76 Chapter 23. English Language Development Assessment ( ELDA) ....................................................... 76 Subchapter A. Background ........................................................................................................................ 76 § 2301. Overview....................................................................................................................... ......... 76 Subchapter B. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 76 § 2303. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 76 Subchapter C. ELDA Test Design............................................................................................................. 76 § 2305. Format......................................................................................................................... ........... 76 Subchapter D. Target Population............................................................................................................... 76 § 2307. Participation Criteria............................................................................................................... 76 Subchapter E. Proficiency Levels and Proficiency Standards................................................................... 77 § 2309. Proficiency Levels .................................................................................................................. 77 § 2311. Proficiency Standards ............................................................................................................. 77 Subchapter F. ELDA Proficiency Level Descriptors................................................................................. 79 § 2313. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 79 § 2315. Proficiency Level Descriptors ................................................................................................ 79 Subchapter G. ELDA Assessment Structure ............................................................................................. 79 § 2317. Listening Domain Structure.................................................................................................... 79 § 2319. Speaking Domain Structure .................................................................................................... 80 Table of Contents § 2321. Reading Domain Structure...................................................................................................... 80 § 2323. Writing Domain Structure ...................................................................................................... 80 Chapter 24. Academic Skills Assessment ( ASA)................................................................................... 80 Subchapter A. Background ........................................................................................................................ 80 § 2400. Sunset Provision ..................................................................................................................... 80 § 2401. Description.................................................................................................................... ......... 80 Subchapter B. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 80 § 2403. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 80 Subchapter C. ASA Test Design................................................................................................................ 81 § 2405. Format......................................................................................................................... ........... 81 Subchapter D. Target Population............................................................................................................... 81 § 2407. Membership ............................................................................................................................ 81 § 2409. Achievement Levels ............................................................................................................... 81 § 2411. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 81 Subchapter F. Achievement Level Descriptors ......................................................................................... 81 § 2412. Introduction................................................................................................................... ......... 81 § 2413. ASA Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors............................................................... 82 § 2415. ASA LAA 2 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors................................................... 82 Chapter 25. Field Testing........................................................................................................................ 83 § 2501. General Provisions.................................................................................................................. 83 § 2503. Field Test Administration ....................................................................................................... 83 Chapter 27. Placement Tests................................................................................................................... 84 § 2701. Administration and Scoring.................................................................................................... 84 § 2703. Security ............................................................................................................................... ... 84 Chapter 29. Graduation Exit Examination (" Old" GEE) ........................................................................ 84 § 2901. General Provisions.................................................................................................................. 84 § 2903. Performance Standards ........................................................................................................... 84 § 2905. Transfer Students .................................................................................................................... 84 § 2907. Student Membership Determination....................................................................................... 85 Chapter 31. Louisiana Alternate Assessment- B ..................................................................................... 85 § 3101. Special Education Needs ........................................................................................................ 85 Chapter 33. Assessment of Special Populations..................................................................................... 86 § 3301. Participation.................................................................................................................. ......... 86 § 3303. Special Education Students..................................................................................................... 86 § 3305. Students with One or More Disabilities According to Section 504........................................ 86 § 3306. Approved Accommodations for Special Education and Section 504 Students ...................... 88 § 3307. Limited English Proficient Students ....................................................................................... 89 Chapter 35. Assessment of Students in Special Circumstances ............................................................. 90 § 3501. Approved Home Study Program Students.............................................................................. 90 § 3503. Homebound Students.............................................................................................................. 90 § 3505. Foreign Exchange Students .................................................................................................... 91 § 3507. Office of Juvenile Justice........................................................................................................ 91 § 3509. Expelled Students ................................................................................................................... 91 § 3511. Migrant Students..................................................................................................................... 91 Louisiana A 1 dministrative Code April 2015 Title 28 EDUCATION Part CXI. Bulletin 118― Statewide Assessment Standards and Practices Chapter 1. General Provisions § 101. Purpose A. Bulletin 118 is intended to provide Louisiana educators and education administrators with a unified and comprehensive guide to testing programs, policies, and procedures in the state. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 and R. S. 17: 391.1– 391.11. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1526 ( July 2005). § 103. Overview A. The Louisiana Legislature in Regular Session during the summer of 1997 amended and reenacted R. S. 17: 24.4( F) and ( G)( 1), relative to the Louisiana Competency- Based Education Program, to require proficiency on certain tests as determined by the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education ( SBESE) for student promotion and to provide guidelines relative to the content of pupil progression plans. B. The amendment and reenactment of the Louisiana Competency- Based Education Program was the result of an ever- increasing demand by Louisiana taxpayers for a better accounting of educational dollars. Act 621, the Public School Accountability Law statute initiated the following guidelines, which continue in the Louisiana Competency- Based Education Program. The Public School Accountability Law called for: 1. the establishment of a program for shared educational accountability in the public educational system of Louisiana; 2. the attainment of established testing standards for education; 3. the provision of information for an analysis of the effectiveness of instructional programs through test assessment results; and 4. the annual assessment of students based on state content standards. C. The Louisiana Competency- Based Education Program is based on the premise that the program must provide options to accommodate the many different learning styles of students. Every effort is made to tailor the test design and structure to the needs of individual students, including students with special instructional needs who subsequently need test accommodations. D. The Louisiana Department of Education ( LDE) will provide leadership and assistance to school districts in an effort to attain a public system of education that makes the opportunity to test successfully available to all students on equal terms. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 24: 4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1526 ( July 2005). § 105. Testing and Accountability A. Every school shall participate in a school accountability system based on student achievement as approved by the SBESE. B. Under No Child Left Behind ( NCLB), the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002, a state's definition of Adequate Yearly Progress ( AYP) must apply the same high standards of academic achievement to all public elementary and secondary school students in the state and result in continuous and substantial academic improvement for all students, including students with disabilities. C. All LEAs must administer all assessments according to the testing schedule dates approved by SBESE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 10.1. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1526 ( July 2005), amended LR 33: 255 ( February 2007). § 107. Assessment Programs A. Kindergarten Developmental Readiness Screening Program ( KDRSP). Each school district is required to administer an approved screening instrument to each child entering kindergarten for the first time, with the results to be used for placement and planning instruction. B. Louisiana Educational Assessment Program ( LEAP). Criterion- referenced tests in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies assess student performance relative to specific benchmarks established in the state's content standards and provide data for evaluating student, school, and district performance. The tests assess a student's complex thinking skills as well as knowledge and application of information. These high- stakes tests are tied to promotional policy for grades 4 and 8. C. Graduation Exit Examination ( GEE). Criterion- referenced tests in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies assess student performance relative to specific benchmarks established in the state's content standards and provide data for evaluating student, school, and district performance. These high- stakes tests require high school students to meet established achievement levels to be eligible to receive a high school diploma. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 2 D. Integrated Louisiana Educational Assessment Program ( iLEAP). The iLEAP will integrate criterion- referenced tests and norm- referenced tests into one program to provide data for evaluating students, schools, and district performance in grades 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 beginning with the 2005- 2006 academic year. E. LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 ( LAA 1). The LAA 1 is a performance- based student assessment that evaluates each eligible special education student's knowledge and skills in targeted areas. It is an " on- demand" assessment, which means the test administrator directs the student to perform a specific task and then scores the student's performance after the task is completed. F. LEAP Alternate Assessment; Level 2 ( LAA 2). The LAA 2 is a criterion- referenced assessment; which is based on modified academic achievement standards that allow students with persistent academic disabilities who are served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act ( IDEA) to participate in academic assessments that are sensitive to measuring progress in their learning. The last administration of LAA 2 assessment in grades 3- 8 will occur in the academic year 2013- 2014. G. English Language Development Assessment ( ELDA). The ELDA is a research- based program designed to measure proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening to English of LEP students; the program began in the 2004- 2005 academic year. H. End- of- Course Tests ( EOCT). The EOCT will be administered to high school students enrolled in and/ or receiving credit for an EOCT course online beginning fall 2007. The tests, which are criterion- referenced and standards- based, will be phased in over a period of six years to assess student mastery of six high school courses. I. The Iowa Tests. The Iowa Tests of Basic Skills ( ITBS), used in grades 3, 5, 6, and 7, and the Iowa Tests of Educational Development ( ITED), used in grade 9, are norm- referenced tests that provide comparative data to evaluate student, school, and district performance. The last administration of The Iowa Tests will occur in the academic year 2004- 2005. J. Graduation Exit Examination (" old" GEE). The " old" GEE measures curricula- based proficiencies in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Written Composition, Science, and Social Studies. The administration of the " old" GEE became a district responsibility beginning with the 2003- 2004 academic year. K. LEAP Alternate Assessment- B ( LAA- B). The LAA- B, which was administered from 2000 through 2003, assessed special education students who met specific criteria at their functioning levels in language/ reading and/ or mathematics, rather than at their enrolled grade levels. L. National Assessment of Educational Progress ( NAEP). Also known as the Nation's Report Card, NAEP is administered nationally to a random stratified sample population of students to gather data about subject- matter achievement, instructional experiences, and school environment. M. Field Tests. Representative student populations from school districts throughout Louisiana are chosen to field test new items to be used in future statewide assessments, including LEAP, GEE, ELDA, and iLEAP. The items are tested, scored, ranked statistically, and identified as effective or ineffective. N. Placement Tests. Students from out- of- district or in- state educational settings, such as approved home study programs or nonpublic schools, who wish to enroll in public schools at grades 5 and 9 must take a placement test if they have not taken and met the requirements for LEAP. Students taking the placement test must score basic or above in English Language Arts or Mathematics and approaching basic or above in the other to enroll in grade 5 and score approaching basic or above in English Language Arts and Mathematics to enroll in grade 9. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1526 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 233 ( February 2006), LR 33: 255 ( February 2007), LR 36: 477 ( March 2010), LR 40: 2509 ( December 2014). § 109. Assessment Populations A. Classified Populations 1. Definition Classified Population― a population of students that is identified for educational and accountability purposes. 2. Regular Education Students. These are students who have not been identified as eligible for special education and related services. 3. Special Education Students. This group includes: a. Students with Disabilities. These are students who have been evaluated in accordance with CFR 300.530- 300.536 as having mental retardation, a hearing impairment including deafness, a speech or language impairment, a visual impairment including blindness, serious emotional disturbance ( hereafter referred to as emotional disturbance), an orthopedic impairment, autism, traumatic brain injury, and other health impairment, a specific learning disability, deaf- blindness, or multiple disabilities, and who, by reason thereof, needs special education and related services ( Federal Register, Vol. 64, No. 48); b. Gifted and Talented Students. These are students who have been identified as possessing demonstrated or potential abilities that give evidence of high- performing capabilities in intellectual, creative, specific academic or leadership areas, or ability in the performing or visual arts and who require services or activities not ordinarily provided by the school in order to fully develop such capabilities ( HR 637- Gifted and Talented Students Education Act of 1999); c. Section 504 Students. These are students with one or more disabilities according to the regulations for Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 3 dministrative Code April 2015 Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which defines disability as a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities. ( PL95- 602 Title 1, Sec. 122 [ a] [ 4]-[ 8]); d. limited English proficient students. These are students who are aged 3 through 21; who were not born in the United States or whose native language is a language other than English; who are Native Americans or Alaska Natives or native residents of the outlying areas and come from an environment where a language other than English has had significant impact on their level of English language proficiency; or who are migratory, whose native language is a language other than English, and who come from an environment where a language other than English is dominant; and whose difficulties in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language may be sufficient to deny them: i. the ability to meet the state's proficient level of achievement on state assessments; ii. the ability to successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English; or iii. the opportunity to participate in society. B. Nonclassified Populations 1. Definition Nonclassified Population― a population of students that is identified for reasons other than educational or accountability purposes. 2. Homebound Program Students. These are students who are unable to attend school as a result of health care treatment or physical illness and who are assigned a teacher to instruct them at home or in a hospital environment. 3. Approved Home Study Program Students. These students are taught in a program with a state- approved curriculum that is implemented under the direction and control of a parent or a tutor. A tutor is defined as a court- appointed guardian under Louisiana law. 4. Foreign Exchange Students. These students are citizens of another nation who have come under the auspices of a specific program to study in U. S. public elementary and secondary schools. 5. Correctional Facilities. These are students attending alternative schools under the Office of Youth Development. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1527 ( July 2005), amended LR 33: 255 ( February 2007). § 111. Limitations on Public Release of Assessment Data A. When the total N- count in any reporting category or group on an assessment report is nine or less, do not release the assessment data publicly. B. When the total N- count in any reporting category or group on an assessment report is ten or greater and all students are reported at one achievement level, do not release the assessment data publicly. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 255 ( February 2007). Chapter 3. Test Security § 301. Participation A. All persons involved in assessment programs must abide by the security policies and procedures established by the LDE and the SBESE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 81.6 et seq., R. S. 416 et seq., and R. S. 441 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1528 ( July 2005). § 303. Definitions Access— access to secure test materials means physically handling the materials, not reading, reviewing, or analyzing test items or student responses, either before, during, or after testing, except where providing approved accommodations. Secure Materials― test materials that contain test items or student responses and to which access is restricted. Secure test materials include: 1. student test booklets; 2. student answer documents; 3. student log- in information; and 4. any other materials that contain test items or student responses. Testing Irregularity― any incident in test handling or administration that leads to a question regarding the security of the test or the accuracy of the test data. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 81.6 et seq., R. S. 416 et seq., and R. S. 441 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1528 ( July 2005), amended LR 34: 65 ( January 2008), LR 40: 2510 ( December 2014). § 305. Test Security Policy A. The state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education holds the test security policy to be of utmost importance and deems any violation of test security to be serious. The test security policy follows. 1. Tests administered by or through the SBESE shall include but not be limited to: a. all alternate assessments; b. all criterion- referenced tests ( CRTs) and norm- referenced tests ( NRTs). EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 4 2. For purposes of this policy, school districts shall include: a. local education agencies ( LEAs) as well as the Recovery School District ( RSD); b. special school districts; c. approved special schools, such as the Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired and Louisiana School for the Deaf; d. laboratory schools; e. type 2 and type 5 charter schools; f. Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts; and g. participating nonpublic/ other schools that utilize tests administered through the SBESE or the LDE. 3. It shall be a violation of test security for any person to do any of the following: a. administer tests in a manner that is inconsistent with the administrative instructions provided by the LDE that would give examinees an unfair advantage or disadvantage; b. give examinees access to test questions prior to testing; c. examine any test item at any time ( except for students during the test or test administrators while providing the accommodations Tests Read Aloud or Communication Assistance, Transferred Answers, or Answers Recorded for students determined to be eligible for those accommodations); d. at any time, copy, reproduce, record, store electronically, discuss or use in a manner inconsistent with test regulations all or part of any secure test item, test booklet, answer document, or supplementary secure materials; e. coach examinees in any manner during testing or alter or interfere with examinees' responses in any manner; f. provide answers to students in any manner during the test, including provision of cues, clues, hints, and/ or actual answers in any form: i. written; ii. printed; iii. verbal; or iv. nonverbal; g. administer published parallel, previously administered, or current forms of any statewide assessment ( e. g., Louisiana Educational Assessment Program [ LEAP]; Integrated LEAP [ iLEAP]; Graduation Exit Examination [ GEE]; Graduation Exit Examination [" old" GEE]; LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 [ LAA 1]; LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 [ LAA 2]; the English Language Development Assessment [ ELDA]; end- of- course tests ( EOCT) online assessments; forms K, L, M, A, and B and all new forms of the Iowa tests; or EXPLORE and PLAN as a practice test or study guide; h. fail to follow security regulations for distribution and return of secure test booklets, answer documents, student log- in information, supplementary secure materials as well as overages as directed; or fail to account for and secure test materials before, during, or after testing; i. conduct testing in environments that differ from the usual classroom environment ( excluding computer labs used for online testing) without prior written permission from the LDE, Division of Standards, Assessments, and Accountability except for the purpose of providing accommodations; j. fail to report any testing irregularities to the district test coordinator ( a testing irregularity is any incident in test handling or administration that leads to a question regarding the security of the test or the accuracy of the test data), who must report such incidents to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability; k. participate in, direct, aid, counsel, assist in, encourage, or fail to report any of the acts prohibited in the section. 4. Each school district as described in this policy shall develop and adopt a district test security policy and procedures for handling emergencies during online testing that is in compliance with the state's test security policy. A copy of the policy and a Statement of Assurance regarding the LEA's test security policy must be submitted annually to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. This statement must include the name of the individual designated by the district superintendent or institution to procure test material. The policy shall provide: a. for the security of the test materials during testing, including test booklets, answer documents, student log- in information, supplementary secure materials, videotapes, and completed observation sheets; b. for the storage of all tests materials, except district and school test coordinator manuals and test administration manuals, in a designated secure locked area before, during, and after testing; all secure materials, including any parallel forms of a test, must be kept in locked storage at both the district and school levels; secure materials must never be left in open areas or unattended; c. a description and record of professional development on test security, test administration, and security procedures for individual student test data provided for all individuals with access to test materials or individual student test data ( access to test materials by school personnel means any contact with or handling the materials but does not include reviewing tests or analyzing test items, which are prohibited); d. a list of personnel authorized to have access to the locked secure storage area; Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 5 dministrative Code April 2015 e. procedures for investigating any testing irregularities, including violations in test security, such as plagiarism and excessive wrong- to- right erasures identified through erasure analysis; f. procedures for the investigation of employees accused of irregularities or improprieties in the administration of standardized tests, as required by the amended R. S. 17: 81.6; g. procedures for the investigation of any missing test booklets, answer documents, student log- in information, or supplementary secure material; h. procedures for ensuring the security of individual student test data in electronic and paper formats– including encryption of student demographics in any email correspondence; i. to the extent practicable, procedures to assign a different test administrator for a class than the teacher of record for the class, except for teachers testing students with accommodations and younger students, grades 3 through 8; j. starting with the 2014– 2015 school year, procedures to code testing materials at no more than two secure central locations and to house the testing materials at the central locations until no more than three working days prior to test administration, to the extent practicable; k. procedures for monitoring of test sites to ensure that appropriate test security procedures are being followed and to observe test administration procedures. 5. Procedures for investigating missing secure materials, any testing irregularity ( including cheating), and any employees accused of improprieties must, at a minimum, include the following. a. The district test coordinator shall initiate the investigation upon the district's determination of an irregularity or breach of security or upon notification by the LDE. The investigation shall be conducted by the district test coordinator and other central office staff as designated by the district superintendent. b. The location of the designated secure locked area for storage of materials shall be examined, and the individuals with access to secure materials shall be identified. c. Interviews regarding testing administration and security procedures shall be conducted with the principal, school test coordinator( s), test administrator( s), and proctor( s) at the identified schools. All individuals who had access to the test materials at any time must be interviewed. d. Interviews shall be conducted with students in the identified classes regarding testing procedures, layout of the classroom, access to test materials before the test, and access to unauthorized materials during testing. 6. After completion of the investigation, the school district shall provide a report of the investigation and a written plan of action to the state superintendent within 30 calendar days of the initiation of the investigation. At a minimum, the report shall include the nature of the situation, the time and place of occurrence, and the names of the persons involved in or witness to the occurrence. Officials from the LDE are authorized to conduct additional investigations. 7. All test administrators and proctors must sign the Oath of Security and return it to the STC to keep on file for three years. The STC and principal must sign an oath of security and return it to the DTC to be kept on file at the district for three years. 8. Test materials, including all test booklets, answer documents, student log- in information, and supplementary secure materials containing secure test questions, shall be kept secure and accounted for in accordance with the procedures specified in the test administration manuals and other communications provided by the LDE. Secure test materials include test booklets, answer documents, student log- in information, and any supplementary secure materials. 9. Procedures described in the test manuals shall include, but are not limited to, the following. a. All test booklets, answer documents, student log- in information, and supplementary secure materials must be kept in a designated locked secure storage area prior to and after administration of any test. i. Test administrators are to be given access to the tests and any supplementary secure materials only on the day the test is to be administered, and these are to be retrieved immediately after testing is completed for the day and stored in the designated locked secure storage area each day of testing. b. All test booklets, answer documents, student log- in information, and supplementary secure materials must be accounted for and written documentation kept by test administrators and proctors for each point at which test materials are distributed and returned. c. Any discrepancies noted in the serial numbers of test booklets, answer documents, and any supplementary secure materials, or the quantity received from contractors must be reported to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, by the designated institutional or school district personnel prior to the administration of the test. d. In the event that test booklets, answer documents, or supplementary secure materials are determined to be missing while in the possession of the institution or school district or in the event of any other testing irregularities or breaches of security, the designated institutional or school district personnel must immediately notify by telephone the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, and follow the detailed procedures for investigating and reporting specified in this policy. e. Only personnel trained in test security and administration shall be allowed to have access to or administer any statewide assessments. f. Each district superintendent or institution must annually designate one individual in the district or institution EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 6 as district test coordinator, who is authorized to procure test materials that are utilized in testing programs administered by or through the SBESE of the LDE. The name of the individual designated must be provided in writing to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, and included on the Statement of Assurance. g. Testing shall be conducted in class- sized groups. Bulletin 741 ( 913A) states that K- 3 classroom enrollment should be no more than 26 students, and in grades 4- 12, no more than 33, except in certain activity types of classes in which the teaching approach and the material and equipment are appropriate for large groups. For grades K- 8, the maximum class size for Health and Physical Education classes may be no more than 40. Class size for exceptional students is generally smaller Bulletin 741, ( 915). Permission for testing in environments that differ from the usual classroom environment must be obtained in writing from the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, at least 30 days prior to testing. If testing outside the usual classroom environment is approved by the Division of Assessments and Accountability, the school district must provide at least one proctor for every 30 students. h. The state superintendent of education may disallow test results that may have been achieved in a manner that is in violation of test security. 10. The LDE shall establish procedures to identify: a. improbable achievement of test score gains; b. situations in which collaboration between or among individuals may occur during the testing process; c. a verification of the number of all tests distributed and the number of tests returned; d. excessive wrong- to- right erasures for multiple- choice tests; e. any violation to written composition or open- ended responses ( including electronic submissions) that involves plagiarism; f. any other situation that may result in invalidation of test results: 11. In cases in which test results are not accepted because of a breach of test security or action by the LDE, any programmatic, evaluative, or graduation criteria dependent upon the data shall be deemed not to have been met. 12. Individuals shall adhere to all procedures specified in all manuals that govern mandated testing programs. 13. Anyone known to be involved in the presentation of forged, counterfeit, or altered identification for the purposes of obtaining admission to a test administration site for any test administered by or through the SBESE or the LDE shall have breached test security. Any individual who knowingly causes or allows the presentation of forged, counterfeited, or altered identification for the purpose of obtaining admission to any test administration site must forfeit all test scores but will be allowed to retake the test at the next test administration. 14. School districts must ensure that individual student test data are protected from unauthorized access and disclosure. a. The LEAPdata Query system is designed for teachers and contains students’ private information, including state test scores and state identification numbers. The system is password protected and requires a user ID and an assigned password for access. The system is not for public use, and any student information from the system must not be disclosed to anyone other than a state, district, or school official as defined by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 ( FERPA). A state, district, or school official is a person employed by the state, district, or school as an administrator, supervisor, district test coordinator, school test coordinator, principal, teacher, or principal's designated office staff. Such a user must have a legitimate educational purpose to review an educational record in order to fulfill his/ her professional responsibility. Curiosity does not qualify as a right to know. State, district and school officials who are granted a password to these systems must abide by FERPA law. Disclosure of passwords to anyone other than those authorized is prohibited. Disclosure of a student’s data to their parent or guardian must be in accordance with FERPA. For more information on FERPA, see the U. S. Department of Education web page at http:// www. ed. gov / offices/ OM/ fpco/ ferpa/. i. LEAPdata Query System User Access. Principals should contact their DTC or backup DTC for assistance in training teachers. After training, all school users ( e. g., teachers, counselors, test coordinators) must read and sign the confidentiality agreement and return it to the principal. Signed confidentiality agreements are valid until the DTC receives notification that the confidentiality agreement available online has been revised. A new confidentiality agreement should be signed by all users each year after the new password letters for schools and districts are automatically generated in August. If a breach in security occurs, principals should immediately contact the DTC or the backup DTC for a replacement password. Principals should always contact their DTC or backup DTC for assistance and training. b. The LEAPweb Reporting System and the End- of- Course Tests Online Assessment System are designed for administrators only and contains students' private information, including state test scores and state identification numbers. The system is password protected and requires a user ID and an assigned password for access. The systems are not for public use and any student information from the system must not be disclosed to anyone other than a state, district, or school official as defined by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 ( FERPA). A state, district, or school official is a person employed by the state, district, or school as an administrator, supervisor, district test coordinator, school test coordinator, principal, and the principal's designated office staff. Such a user must have a legitimate educational purpose to review an Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 7 dministrative Code April 2015 educational record in order to fulfill his/ her professional responsibility. Curiosity does not qualify as a right to know. State, district, and school users who are granted a password to this system must read and abide by Family and Educational Rights Privacy Act ( FERPA). Disclosure of passwords to anyone other than those authorized is prohibited. Disclosure of a student's data to their parent or guardian must be in accordance with FERPA. For more information on FERPA, see the U. S. Department of Education web page at http:// www. ed. gov/ offices/ OM/ fpco/ ferpa/. i. LEAPweb Reporting System User Access. At the school level, only principals ( not teachers) and their designated school personnel ( test coordinators, counselors, or office staff with whom the principal shares his/ her PIN) should have access to the system and must sign a confidentiality agreement. Signed confidentiality agreements are valid until the DTC receives notification that the confidentiality agreement available online has been revised. A new confidentiality agreement should be signed by all users each year after the new password letters for schools and districts are automatically generated in August. If a breach in security occurs, principals should immediately contact the DTC or the backup DTC for a replacement password. Principals should always contact their DTC or backup DTC for assistance and training. ii. EOC Tests Online Assessment System User Access. At the school level, only school test coordinators, teachers, and test administrators participating in a given administration should have access to the system and must sign a confidentiality agreement. A new confidentiality agreement shall be signed by all users each year after the new password letters for schools and districts are automatically generated in August. If a breach in security involving access to secure test systems occurs, principals should immediately contact the DTC or the backup DTC for a replacement password. Principals should always contact their DTC or backup DTC for assistance and training. iii. Confidentiality agreements must also be signed by DTCs for the LEAPweb Reporting, EOC Tests Online Assessment System, and LEAPdata Query Systems and returned to the LDE. New signed agreements should be submitted to LDE when personnel changes are made within the district. Log- in information will not be issued until a signed agreement is on file with the LDE. c. The Louisiana Department of Education's Enhanced Assessment of Grade Level Expectations ( EAGLE) System contains students' private information, including test scores and state identification numbers. This system is password protected and requires a user ID and an assigned password for access. Any student information from the system must not be disclosed to anyone other than a state, district, or school official, or parent/ guardian as defined by The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 ( FERPA). For more information on FERPA, see the U. S. Department of Education web page at http:// www. ed. gov/ offices/ OM/ fpco/ ferpa/. A state, district, or school official is a person employed by the state, district, or school as an administrator, supervisor, district test coordinator, school test coordinator, principal, teacher, or support staff member. This user has a legitimate educational purpose to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Curiosity does not qualify as a right to know. All users who are granted a password to this system must abide by FERPA law. Disclosure of passwords to anyone other than those authorized is prohibited. i. EAGLE System User Access. Principals should contact their district designee, DTC, backup DTC, or district curriculum supervisor for assistance in training teachers. All users ( e. g., teachers, counselors, test coordinators) must read and sign the confidentiality agreement and return it to the principal. Signed confidentiality agreements are valid until the DTC receives notification that the confidentiality agreement available online has been revised. A new confidentiality agreement should be signed by all users each year after the new password letters for schools and districts are automatically generated in August. Keep copies signed by all school users on file at the school. If a breach in security occurs, principals should immediately contact the district designee, district test coordinator, or backup district designee for a replacement password. Principals should always contact their district designee, DTC, backup DTC, or district curriculum supervisor for assistance and training. d. All users who have access to these systems and leave their positions at a district or school site must not use or share the password. 15. District test coordinators are responsible for providing training regarding the security and confidentiality of individual student test data ( in paper and electronic formats) and of aggregated data of fewer than 10 students. 16. LDE staff will conduct site visits during testing to observe test administration procedures and to ensure that appropriate test security procedures are being followed. Schools with prior violations of test security or other testing irregularities will be identified for visits. Other schools will be randomly selected. 17. Any teachers or other school personnel who breach test security or allow breaches in test security shall be disciplined in accordance with the provisions of R. S. 17: 416 et seq., R. S. 17: 441 et seq., R. S. 17: 81 et seq., policy and regulations adopted by the SBESE, and any and all laws that may be enacted by the Louisiana Legislature. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.7( C)( G). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1528 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 233 ( February 2006), LR 33: 255 ( February 2007), LR 33: 424 ( March 2007), LR 33: 2033 ( October 2007), LR 34: 65 ( January 2008), LR 34: 431 ( March 2008), LR 34: 1351 ( July 2008), LR 35: 217 ( February 2009), LR 37: 858 ( March 2011), repromulgated LR 37: 1123 ( April 2011), amended LR 38: 747 ( March 2012), LR 39: 1018 ( April 2013), LR 40: 2510 ( December 2014). EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 8 § 307. Change of District Test Coordinator Notification A. If during the academic year the person appointed as district test coordinator changes, the district superintendent must notify the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. The notification must be in writing and must be submitted within 15 days of the change in appointment. 1. The former district test coordinator must inform the new district test coordinator of passwords for LEAPweb and LEAPdata, location of placement tests, and location of " Old" GEE testing materials. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1530 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 234 ( February 2006), LR 33: 257 ( February 2007), LR 34: 1351 ( July 2008), LR 35: 217 ( February 2009). § 309. Erasure Analysis A. To investigate erasures on student answer documents for the multiple- choice portions of the state criterion- referenced and norm- referenced testing programs, the SBESE and the LDE have developed the following procedures. 1. Scoring contractors scan every answer document for wrong- to- right erasures, and the state average and standard deviation are computed for each subject at each grade level. 2. Students whose wrong- to- right erasures exceed the state average by more than four standard deviations are identified for further investigation. For each student with excessive erasures, the proportion of wrong- to- right erasures to the total number of erasures is considered. 3. Based on the criteria for excessive wrong- to- right erasures, scoring contractors produce the following reports. a. District/ School Erasure Analysis Report. This report identifies districts and schools within the districts whose answer documents have excessive wrong- to- right erasures. b. Student Erasure Analysis Report. This report identifies individual students whose answer documents have excessive wrong- to- right erasures. The answer documents of students identified as having excessive wrong- to- right answers are available for review at the LDE upon request. 4. Once districts, schools, and individual students have been identified, the state superintendent of education sends letters to district superintendents stating that students in those districts have been identified as having excessive wrong- to- right erasures. Copies of the district/ school and student erasure analysis reports are enclosed with the letters. Copies of the correspondence are provided to the Deputy Superintendent of Education, the Assistant Superintendent of the Office of Student and School Performance, the Director of the Division of Assessments and Accountability, and the district test coordinator. 5. The local superintendent must investigate the case of the irregularity and provide a report of the investigation and a written plan of action to the state superintendent of education within 30 calendar days. 6. A summary report of erasure analysis irregularities will be presented to the SBESE after each test administration. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1530 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 234 ( February 2006), LR 33: 257 ( February 2007), LR 35: 217 ( February 2009), LR 35: 443 ( March 2009), LR 40: 2512 ( December 2014). § 311. Addressing Suspected Violations of Test Security and Troubling Content in Written Responses ( Constructed Responses, Short Answers, and Essays) A. The Test Security Policy approved by the SBESE requires that the LDE establish procedures to deal with breaches of test security. District authorities provide the LDE information about voiding student tests because of student violations observed during test administration or violations by school personnel or others that have been reported. In addition, the scoring process produces information regarding written responses that have common elements, which indicate a student brought unauthorized materials to testing and used them to assist in writing; that indicate that teacher interference might have been a significant factor, and in which troubling content was evident. Procedures for dealing with these issues follow. 1. Violation by Student as Observed by Test Administrator a. The test administrator must notify the school test coordinator about any suspected incident of cheating and provide a written account of the incident. Answer documents in such cases should be processed like all other answer documents. b. The school test coordinator must then convene a school- level test security committee consisting at a minimum of the principal, the school test coordinator, and the test administrator to determine whether a test should be voided. c. If it is deemed necessary to void the test, the school test coordinator must notify the district test coordinator of the void request in a letter written on school letterhead, signed by the school principal and the school test coordinator. The original account of the incident written by the test administrator must be enclosed. d. The district test coordinator must then fax a completed void form to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, as directed in the District and School Test Coordinators Manual. The original Void Verification form, along with a copy of the school test coordinator's request for the void, must also be mailed to the LDE, Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 9 dministrative Code April 2015 Division of Assessments and Accountability, as directed in the manual. 2. Reported Violations by School Personnel or Other Persons. All suspected instances of cheating should be reported directly to the school's district test coordinator for further investigation, and a report of the incident must be sent to LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. If it is deemed necessary to void tests, the DTC must fax a completed void form to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. The original Void Verification form along with a written report of the investigation carried out must be mailed to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. 3. Suspected Violations Discovered by Scoring Contractors a. In addition to erasure analysis for multiple- choice items, possible incidents of the following violations may be discovered during the scoring process: i. plagiarism. Responses contain exact or almost exact content, and/ or words or phrases, and/ or format; ii. use of unauthorized materials. Students brought unauthorized materials into the testing environment and used them to assist in written responses; iii. teacher interference. Teacher interference is evident in written responses. b. If possible incidents of violations are discovered in the scoring process, the scoring contractor notifies the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, of suspect documents with a summary of its findings. c. Professional assessment and related- content personnel from the Division of Assessments and Accountability review the suspect documents and determine whether the evidence supports voiding the responses. d. If voiding is recommended, LDE mails the district superintendent a letter of what was observed during the scoring process that caused the alert and identifies the particular document that was voided. Copies of the correspondence are provided to the deputy superintendent of education, the assistant superintendent of the Office of Student and School Performance, the director of the Division of Assessments and Accountability, and the local district test coordinator. i. Within 30 calendar days of the receipt of such a letter, the district must investigate the incident and provide a written plan of action to the state superintendent of education. If the district and/ or parent/ guardian( s) wish to discuss the situation further or to examine the student responses, a meeting may be scheduled at the LDE offices between staff members from the Division of Assessments and Accountability district representatives, and parent/ guardian( s). 4. Disturbing Content. If student responses with disturbing content are discovered during the scoring process, the scoring contractor will notify the appropriate staff member at the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. a. Professional assessment personnel review the responses. If it is determined that disturbing content causes a compelling need to break confidentiality, LDE will contact the district superintendent by telephone to summarize findings and inform him or her that materials are being mailed regarding the alert. b. Issues regarding troubling content are for the district's information to assist the student and do not require further communication with LDE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1531 ( July 2005), amended LR 33: 257 ( February 2007), LR 35: 217 ( February 2009). § 312. Administrative Error A. Administrative errors that result in questions regarding the security of the test or the accuracy of the test data are considered testing irregularities. If it is deemed necessary to void the test, the district test coordinator must fax a completed void form to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, as directed in the District and School Test Coordinators Manual. The original void verification form, along with a copy of the account of the incident, must also be mailed to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, as directed in the manual. B. If tests are voided by the district due to administrative error, the LEA superintendent, on behalf of individual students, may initiate a request to the state superintendent of education for an opportunity to retest prior to the next scheduled test administration on behalf of individual students. C. If administrative errors result in a question of the accuracy of the test data, the LEA superintendent or the parent, or legal guardian of an affected student may initiate a request for an opportunity to retest prior to the next scheduled test administration. The LEA superintendent or parent must provide the state superintendent of education with school- and student- level documentation describing the administrative error. D. If the LDE determines that an administrative error that allows for a retest did occur the tests will be voided. LDE will notify the LEA of the determination and of arrangements for the retest. The LEA must provide a corrective plan of action. E. To offset costs involved in retesting, the vendor will assess the LEA a fee for each test. F. The LDE will provide a report to the SBESE of retests due to administrative errors. G. Administrative errors that result from failure to transfer answers from a test booklet onto an answer document require the following steps: EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 10 1. the LEA superintendent will place a request on behalf of individual students, which request must include a description of the administrative error and a corrective plan of action, to the state superintendent of education to have the testing vendor send to the district the student’s test booklet and a new answer document; 2. the DTC and STC will transfer only the answers not initially transferred from the test booklet onto the new answer document; and 3. the DTC will return all testing materials to the vendor, who will assess the LEA a fee for the service. H. LEAs have the right to appeal to SBESE to replace the voided or invalid scores with the results from the administrative error retests for accountability purposes. The appeal must include a description of the testing irregularity; a summary of the LEA’s investigation including who conducted the investigation; the findings of the investigation; and a corrective action plan. After review of the submitted documentation by LDOE, the state superintendent will make a recommendation to SBESE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 32: 390 ( March 2006), amended LR 33: 257 ( February 2007), LR 34: 66 ( January 2008), LR 34: 1351 ( July 2008), LR 35: 218 ( February 2009), LR 36: 967 ( May 2010), LR 38: 33 ( January 2012), amended LR 38: 748 ( March 2012), LR 38: 2358 ( September 2012), LR 40: 2512 ( December 2014). § 313. Viewing Answer Documents A. A parent, guardian, student, school, or district must place a request to view an answer document through the district test coordinator. B. The district test coordinator must send a written request to view the answer document to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. The request must include: 1. the student's name; 2. the student's state identification number; 3. the student's enrolled grade; 4. the type of assessment and the content area of the answer document or documents requested; and 5. the district name and code and school name and code where the student tested. C. LDE will notify the testing contractor of the request; the testing contractor will send a copy of the requested answer document( s) to LDE. D. Upon receipt of the requested answer document( s), LDE will contact the district test coordinator who placed the request to schedule an appointment to review the answer document( s). E. The district test coordinator or his or her designee must accompany the school personnel, parent, guardian, and/ or student to the appointment. F. LDE will black out test items on answer documents prior to viewing. Only the student's responses may be observed. G. LDE staff will remain in the room during the viewing of the answer document( s). Answer documents may not be copied or removed from the room. Written notes of student responses may not be made. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1532 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 234 ( February 2006), LR 33: 258 ( February 2007), LR 33: 218 ( February 2007), LR 40: 2512 ( December 2014). § 315. Emergencies during Testing A. For emergencies ( e. g., fire alarms, bomb threats) that require evacuation of the classroom during administration of statewide assessments, the following procedures should be followed. 1. If the room can be locked, the test administrator should direct the students to place the answer document inside the test booklet and leave both on the desk. Before students are allowed back into the room, the test administrator should return to the room, pick up the test booklets, answer documents, and other secure materials, and then distribute them individually to the students when they have returned to their desks. 2. If the room cannot be locked and if at all possible, the test administrators should direct students to place the answer document on top of the test booklet and hand both along with any other secure materials to the test administrator as students file out of the room. Test administrators should carry the documents with them to their designated location outside the building. If return to the building is delayed, the school test coordinator should pick up and check in the materials from the test administrators. 3. If testing has not started prior to the emergency and the students have not yet opened their test booklets and answer documents, testing should start when students return to the room. 4. If students have opened their testing materials to begin testing and test security has been maintained, testing may continue after students return to the room. 5. If the test booklets have been opened and test security has been compromised, testing should not be continued. The answer documents should be sent to the testing company with the responses that were completed prior to the emergency. 6. As a precautionary measure, graduating seniors might be tested together in a single group or in several smaller groups so test security is easier to maintain if there is an emergency. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 11 dministrative Code April 2015 7. If test security has been compromised, the district test coordinator must notify the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, as soon as possible. B. End- of- Course ( EOC) Tests Emergency Plan 1. Each district shall develop and adopt an emergency plan that includes the steps to be followed in the event of an emergency that results in disruption of online testing. 2. If online testing is disrupted by emergencies, lost internet connections, lost power, or computer crashes and students are unable to continue testing on the same day, the school test coordinator should document what occurred as a testing irregularity and notify the district test coordinator. If the student will be unable to return to testing by the end of the day after the disruption, the district test coordinator must immediately notify the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1532 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 234 ( February 2006), LR 33: 258 ( February 2007), LR 34: 66 ( January 2008), LR 35: 218 ( February 2009), LR 37: 858 ( March 2011), LR 38: 33 ( January 2012). § 316. Cell Phones and Other Electronic Devices A. If district and school policy allows for students and personnel to carry cell phones or other similar technological devices with imaging or text- messaging capability, test administrators must make certain that the devices are in the off position while test booklets and answers documents are in the vicinity. 1. Except for devices required for approved accommodations or online assessments, if a student is in possession of and/ or uses a cell phone or electronic device in any manner during the administration of a statewide test, thephone or electronic device will be confiscated until assurance can be evidenced that all traces of information, in print, image, or verbal form, have been removed from all local and cloud storage and that no such traces remain on the device. 2. If evidence exists on the cell phone or other electronic device that indicates the device was used during the test administration and/ or test material was recorded and/ or transmitted, the student’s score is voided. 3. Violation of the no cell phone or electronic device Rule may result in discipline by the district in accordance with local policy. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 32: 391 ( March 2006), amended LR 40: 2512 ( December 2014). § 317. Virtual Charter Schools A. Virtual charter schools shall be responsible for testing their own students. 1. Virtual charter schools shall test their students with staff of the virtual school. Virtual charter schools shall administer all state assessments and are subject to the Louisiana School and District Accountability System. Virtual charter schools shall conduct all state assessments at secure, proctored locations within reasonable distance of students’ homes, as approved by the charter authorizer. 2. Parents and/ or family members of the students of the virtual school shall not test their own children and/ or family members. The local school district shall not test any students enrolled in virtual charter schools unless there is a written agreement between the local school district and the virtual charter school. No local school district shall ever be required to test students attending the virtual school. 3. The district will develop and submit to LDOE annually a test security policy approved by its board. 4. The virtual charter school’s assessment plan shall be part of its board approved test security policy. The plan must identify: a. the state assessments to be administered throughout the year; b. the cities/ towns where testing will occur; c. description of testing locations; d. qualifications of testing personnel; e. procedures for implementation of the requirement of a photo ID of all students to ensure the students reporting for testing are the actual students assigned to that testing site; and f. provisions for students’ transportation to the testing locations. 5. LDOE will monitor the assessment plan. 6. If the student population of the virtual school is spread across multiple parishes, the virtual school shall secure testing centers in those parishes ( e. g., public library meeting rooms; public meeting facility; private meeting facility; rooms at community colleges, technical colleges, colleges). Testing centers shall be physical locations and must be submitted to LDOE prior to testing. A plan for providing student transportation to the assessment location on an as needed basis. 7. Thirty days prior to testing, the virtual charter school shall provide LDOE a list of students with testing accommodations as specified in the IEP for students with disabilities according to IDEA, IAPs for students with disabilities according to section 504, and accommodation plans for limited English proficient ( LEP) students. 8. Within 30 days of testing, the virtual charter schools shall provide LDOE documentation of training in test administration and test security for each test administration. A copy of the following must be included: a. the agenda; b. all training materials; and EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 12 c. all sign- in- sheets. 9. Within 30 days of testing, the virtual charter school shall provide LDOE documentation of the test administration including the: a. testing locations; b. schedule; c. all sign- in sheets for the students assessed with the name of the assessment administered; d. days and times the student was assessed; and e. provided accommodations. 10. LDOE staff shall have the authority to: a. monitor the implementation of the testing plan; b. require changes to the testing plan as deemed necessary. 11. LDOE staff shall: a. notify virtual charter schools of any new requirements to their testing plan; b. annually evaluate the testing plan to ensure full compliance with policies and procedures. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 38: 33 ( January 2012). § 319. E- mail Addresses for Nonpublic and Public School Test Coordinators A. All designated school test coordinators for nonpublic and public schools are required to provide the department with a valid work email address. Personal email addresses ( Yahoo! Hotmail, Google, etc.) will not be accepted. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 74 ( January 2013), amended LR 40: 2512 ( December 2014). Chapter 5. Test Coordinator Responsibilities Subchapter A. District Test Coordinator § 501. District Test Coordinator Role A. 1. A district test coordinator's responsibilities fall into three categories: a. making arrangements for testing; b. handling and maintaining the security of test materials; and c. training school test coordinators, district special education directors/ supervisors, district Section 504 coordinators, district student information system coordinators, and principals. 2. Specific tasks include: a. submitting enrollment data by the yearly deadline; b. appointing a school test coordinator for every school involved in state testing; c. scheduling testing and makeup dates and times of state tests based on state- approved schedules; d. arranging for testing students enrolled in approved home study programs and nonpublic schools; e. coordinating with the district Section 504 coordinator the submission of student Section 504 data to the student information system ( SIS); f. conducting district training sessions for all principals, school test coordinators, district Section 504 coordinators, district student information system coordinators, district special education directors/ supervisors, and district LEP coordinators; g. answering questions about test security, administration, and return of materials; h. receiving and verifying the delivery and return of testing materials; i. designating an appropriate locked, secure area for storing testing materials; j. maintaining the security of test materials immediately upon receipt of testing materials from testing contractors and from schools; k. distributing testing materials to school test coordinators; l. collecting, assembling, and packaging all testing materials and completing and submitting or filing all forms as instructed in the manuals; m. arranging for pickup of testing materials for shipment to the scoring contractor as instructed in the manuals; n. reporting immediately to the LDE, Division of Standards, Assessments, and Accountability, any missing test booklets or answer documents and returning them to test contractors if they are found; o. investigating any testing irregularities and reporting them to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability; p. reporting to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, instances of students marking in a wrong section of the answer document; q. submitting all void and test irregularities forms and documentation as instructed in the manuals; Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 13 dministrative Code April 2015 r. returning any secure materials used for test accommodations, such as transparencies or computer disks, to the LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability; s. maintaining the district password and all school passwords within the district that are used with LEAPweb Reporting System and the LEAPdata Query System; t. training district and school users within a district to effectively use the systems; ensure they are familiar with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ( FERPA) law governing confidentiality of student records, and ensure they have signed a security agreement before receiving a password for access to the LEAPdata Query System; u. ensuring: i. that all district/ school users maintain the security of and access to all student information obtained via the LEAPweb Reporting and LEAPdata Query systems; ii. that all school users are aware that student test data shall not be disclosed to anyone other than another school official and only for a legitimate educational purpose. v. confirming that TA numbers have been assigned at each school for each scheduled test administration; w. distributing passwords annually to each school’s STC; x. distributing student reports and summary reports to school test coordinators and principals in a timely manner. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1533 ( July 2005), amended LR 33: 258 ( February 2007), LR 34: 1352 ( July 2008), LR 34: 2552 ( December 2008), repromulgated LR 35: 57 ( January 2009), amended LR 35: 218 ( February 2009), LR 38: 748 ( March 2012). Subchapter B. School Test Coordinator § 511. School Test Coordinator Role A. A school test coordinator's responsibilities include: 1. supervising testing procedures and materials control at the school level; 2. scheduling testing dates and times with the district test coordinator; 3. making arrangements for a location to test students with certain accommodations or in the case of untimed tests, students who need time beyond that scheduled to complete testing; 4. scheduling and monitoring makeup testing; 5. notifying the district test coordinator immediately of any missing secure materials; 6. verifying the count of all materials received and reporting any discrepancies to the district test coordinator; 7. ensuring the security of testing materials from the time they arrive at the school until the time they are returned to the district test coordinator; 8. noting any discrepancies in the count or numbering of test booklets or answer documents from that recorded on the security check off lists from the testing contractor; 9. notifying the district test coordinator of additional test booklets, answer documents, or manuals needed; 10. reviewing all manuals in their entirety; 11. conducting a training session in test security and administration for test administrators and all other individuals who have access to secure materials before, during, and after test administration; 12. submitting the Verification of Section 504 forms to the school district Section 504 coordinator by the date established in the district; 13. compiling a list of students approved for accommodations, with the accommodations they are to receive, and providing a list of such students in a testing group to individual test administrators; 14. verifying that classrooms have been prepared for testing ( test- related content material removed or covered, sufficient space for students, testing sign on door); 15. distributing materials to test administrators on the appropriate testing day and collecting, checking in and putting into the secure storage area all secure testing materials at the end of each day of testing and during any extended breaks; 16. monitoring testing sessions; 17. supervising test administrators who must transfer student answers from large- print, braille, or other accommodation formats to a scorable answer document; 18. collecting and returning any computer disks or other accommodation- format testing materials; 19. reporting any testing irregularities to the district test coordinator; and 20. packaging test materials as instructed in the manuals for return to the district test coordinator. 21. assigning TA numbers before scheduled test administrations; 22. distributing student reports and summary reports to teachers and parents in a timely manner. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1533 ( July 2005), amended LR 33: 258 ( February 2007), LR 34: 1352 ( July 2008), LR 34: 2552 ( December 2008), repromulgated LR 35: 57 ( January 2009). EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 14 Chapter 7. Assessment Program Overview § 701. Overview of Assessment Programs in Louisiana A. Norm- Referenced and Criterion- Referenced Testing Programs Since 1986 Name of Assessment Program Assessment Population Administered Kindergarten Screening Kindergarten Developmental Readiness Screening Program ( KDRSP) Kindergarten fall 1987- Norm- Referenced Tests ( NRTs) California Achievement Test ( CAT/ F) grades 4, 6, and 9 spring 1988- spring 1992 ( no longer administered) California Achievement Test ( CAT/ 5) grades 4 and 6 grade 8 spring 1993- spring 1997 spring 1997 only ( no longer administered) Iowa Tests of Basic Skills ( ITBS) ( form L) and Iowa Tests of Educational Development ( ITED) ( form M) grades 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 11 spring 1998 ( no longer administered) ITBS ITED ( form M) grades 3, 5, 6, and 7 grade 9 spring 1999- spring 2002 ( no longer administered) ITBS ITED ( form B) grades 3, 5, 6, and 7 grade 9 spring 2003- spring 2005 ( no longer administered) ITBS grade 2 spring 2012- spring 2013 ( no longer administered) Criterion- Referenced Tests ( CRTs) National Assessment of Educational Progress ( NAEP) grades 4, 8, and 12 spring 1990- Louisiana Educational Assessment Program ( LEAP) grades 3, 5, and 7 spring 1989- spring 1998 ( no longer administered) Graduation Exit Examination (“ old” GEE) grades 10 and 11 spring 1989- spring 2003 ( state administered) fall 2003- ( district administered) Louisiana Educational Assessment Program ( LEAP) ( ELA and Mathematics) grades 4 and 8 spring 1999- LEAP ( Science and Social Studies) grades 4 and 8 spring 2000– Graduation Exit Examination ( GEE) ( ELA and Mathematics) grade 10 spring 2001- fall 2014 ( district administered) Name of Assessment Program Assessment Population Administered GEE ( Science and Social Studies) grade 11 spring 2002- fall 2014 ( district administered) End- Of- Course Tests ( EOCT) Algebra I fall 2007- EOCT English II fall 2008- EOCT Geometry fall 2009- EOCT Biology fall 2010- EOCT Applied Algebra I form spring 2011- summer 2013 EOCT English III fall 2011- EOCT U. S. History fall 2012- EXPLORE grades 8 and 9 spring 2013 PLAN grade 10 spring 2013 ACT grade 11 spring 2013 Integrated NRT/ CRT Integrated Louisiana Educational Assessment Program ( iLEAP) grades 3, 5, 7, and 9 spring 2006- iLEAP grade 9 spring 2010 ( last administration of grade 9 iLEAP) Special Population Assessments Louisiana Alternate Assessment, Level 1 ( LAA 1) Students with Individualized Education Programs ( IEPs) who meet participation criteria in grades 3– 11 spring 2000- 2007 LAA 1 ELA and Mathematics ( grade spans 3- 4; 5- 6; 7- 8; 9- 10); Science ( grades 4, 8, and 11) Revised spring 2008- LAA 1 ELA and Mathematics grade 9 spring 2010 ( last administration of grade 9 LAA 1) Louisiana Alternate Assessment, Level 2 ( LAA 2) ELA and Mathematics ( Grades 4 and 8 grades 4, and 8 spring 2006- spring 2014 ( no longer administered) LAA 2 ELA and Mathematics ( Grade 10) Science and Social Studies ( Grade 11) grades 10 and 11 spring 2006- ( available for students who have entered a high school cohort in 13- 14 or prior) LAA 2 ELA and Mathematics grades 5, 6, and 7 spring 2007- spring 2014 ( no longer administered) LAA 2 ELA and Mathematics grade 9 spring 2010 ( last administration of grade 9 LAA 2) LAA 2 Science and Social Studies grades 4 and 8 spring 2008– spring 2014 ( no longer administered) Louisiana Alternate Assessment- B ( LAA- B) [" out- of- level" test] Students with Individualized Education Programs ( IEPs) who met eligibility criteria in grades 3- 11. spring 1999– spring 2003 ( no longer administered) English Language Development Assessment ( ELDA) Limited English Proficient ( LEP) students in grades K- 12 spring 2005- Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 15 dministrative Code April 2015 Name of Assessment Program Assessment Population Administered Academic Skills Assessment ( ASA) and ASA LAA 2 form Students pursuing a State- Approved Skills Certificate ( SASC) or GED spring 2012 ( one administration only, spring 2012) B. As a result of these initiatives, the SBESE in May, 1997 approved content standards in English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, foreign languages, and the arts. The LDE initiated new criterion- referenced tests to align with these standards. In the 1997 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature, the state law was changed to require that criterion- referenced tests be given in grades 4 and 8 rather than in grades 3, 5, and 7. In spring 2002, the new state criterion- referenced tests at grades 4, 8, 10, and 11 were completely phased in and previous criterion- referenced tests were phased out. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1534 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 235 ( February 2006), LR 34: 66 ( January 2008), LR 34: 1352 ( July 2008), LR 35: 218 ( February 2009), LR 36: 967 ( May 2010), LR 37: 858 ( March 2011), LR 38: 34 ( January 2012), LR 39: 74 ( January 2013), LR 39: 1019 ( April 2013), LR 40: 1319 ( July 2014), LR 40: 2512 ( December 2014). Chapter 9. Kindergarten Developmental Readiness Screening Program § 901. Statement of Purpose A. This Chapter provides for the implementation of local kindergarten developmental readiness screening programs as required by Act 146, Regular Session, 1986. Activities conducted under this Chapter shall be coordinated with other forms of screening conducted by the school district. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 1) ( b). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1535 ( July 2005). § 903. Definitions Developmental― the process of identifying appropriate behavior by age level in areas such as motor skills, oral language development, cognitive development, social- emotional development, auditory discrimination, visual discrimination, and self- help skills. Readiness Screening― the process of identifying the performance levels, skills, and abilities of young children through gathering of information concerning their physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.11, R. S. 17.24.4 ( F) ( 1) ( b), and R. S. 17: 151.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1535 ( July 2005). § 905. Target Population A. Every child entering public school kindergarten for the first time shall be screened with a nationally recognized developmental readiness instrument. If a student is identified as having a disability according to Bulletin 1508 and has a current multidisciplinary evaluation, he or she shall not be excluded from this screening. If appropriate developmental screening information from the current evaluation cannot be used, appropriate adaptations of the developmental screening instrument shall be made. The results of the screening shall not exclude any child who meets the age requirements from entering public school kindergarten. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 139.11, 20, R. S. 17: 151.3, R. S. 17: 1941, and USCS § 1400 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1535 ( July 2005). § 907. Agency Administrative Participation A. Screening Instruments. Each school district shall elect and administer one nationally recognized readiness screening instrument from among those recommended by the LDE and approved by the SBESE. The results of this screening shall be used in placing children within a regular kindergarten classroom setting and planning their instructional programs to meet identified needs. B. Administrative Timelines 1. Each school district shall submit to the LDE by the date established by the LDE and annually thereafter the name of the developmental readiness screening instrument selected for system- wide use by the local school board for the purpose of program implementation. 2. Beginning with the 1987- 1988 academic year and annually thereafter, screening shall occur within 30 days before or after the opening date of school. C. Parental Advisement. Beginning with the 1987- 1988 academic year and annually thereafter, school districts shall inform the parent or guardian of the results of the individual student's screening. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq., and R. S. 17: 139 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1535 ( July 2005). § 909. State BESE- Approved Instruments A. Instruments Approved for Use in 1990. School districts that elected to use these instruments at that time can continue to use them. School districts cannot, however, now elect to use these instruments. Name of Instrument Publisher Chicago EARLY Assessment Educational Teaching Aids Miller Assessment for Preschoolers The Psychological Corporation Developing Skills Checklist ( DSC) CTB McMillan/ McGraw- Hill Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning- Revised ( DIAL- R) American Guidance Service EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 16 B. Instruments Approved for Use in April 2001. School districts may use any of these instruments. Name of Instrument Publisher Developmental Indicator for the Assessment of Learning— Third Edition ( DIAL- 3) American Guidance Service Developing Skills Checklist ( DSC) CTB McMillan/ McGraw- Hill Brigance K & 1 Screen Curriculum and Associates Early Screening Inventory— Revised Rebus Screening Test for Education Prerequisite Skills ( STEPS) Western Psychological Services AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 and R. S. 17: 391.11. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1535 ( July 2005). Chapter 11. Louisiana Educational Assessment Program Subchapter A. General Provisions § 1101. Introduction A. The LEAP is a criterion- referenced testing program that is directly aligned with the state content standards, which by law are as rigorous as those of NAEP. The LEAP measures how well students in grades four and eight have mastered the state content standards. Test results are reported in terms of achievement levels. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 1) ( c). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1536 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 235 ( February 2006). Subchapter B. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards § 1113. Achievement Levels A. 1. The Louisiana achievement levels are: a. Advanced; b. Mastery ( Exceeding the Standard); c. Basic ( Meeting the Standard); d. Approaching Basic ( Approaching the Standard); and e. Unsatisfactory. 2. Though the names of the achievement levels differ slightly from those detailed in the NCLB Act, the definitions are similar. The definitions of the Louisiana achievement levels are also consistent with the definitions of basic, proficient, and advanced in English language arts and mathematics for NAEP. B. Achievement Level Definitions 1. Advanced― a student at this level has demonstrated superior performance beyond the mastery level. 2. Mastery ( formerly Proficient)― a student at this level has demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter and is well prepared for the next level of schooling. 3. Basic― a student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 4. Approaching Basic― a student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 5. Unsatisfactory― a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.24.4 ( F) ( 1) and ( C). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1536 ( July 2005). § 1115. Performance Standards A. Performance standards for LEAP English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies tests are finalized in scaled- score form. The scaled scores range between 100 and 500 for all grades and content areas. B. LEAP Achievement Levels and Scaled Score Ranges  Grade 4 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Advanced 408- 500 419- 500 405- 500 399- 500 Mastery 354- 407 370- 418 360- 404 353- 398 Basic 301- 353 315- 369 306- 359 301- 352 Approaching Basic 263- 300 282- 314 263- 305 272- 300 Unsatisfactory 100- 262 100- 281 100- 262 100- 271 C. LEAP Achievement Levels and Scaled Score Ranges  Grade 8 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Advanced 402- 500 398- 500 400- 500 404- 500 Mastery 356- 401 376- 397 345- 399 350- 403 Basic 315- 355 321- 375 305- 344 297- 349 Approaching Basic 269- 314 296- 320 267- 304 263- 296 Unsatisfactory 100- 268 100- 295 100- 266 100- 262 Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 17 dministrative Code April 2015 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4 ( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1536 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 235 ( February 2006). Subchapter C. LEAP Achievement Level Descriptors § 1125. Introduction A. Achievement level descriptors for Louisiana assessments were developed by committees composed of Louisiana educators who represented the subjects and grades assessed. The descriptors define what a student should know and be able to do at each achievement level for each subject assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4 ( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1536 ( July 2005). § 1127. Grade 4 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 4 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate a thorough understanding of what they read; 2. extend ideas in texts by making generalizations supported by textual evidence; 3. explain how authors use different literary elements; and 4. research topics by evaluating information in a variety of sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with sharply focused central ideas, thorough elaboration, and well- chosen evidence from texts; 2 create compositions with effective transitions and a sense of wholeness; 3. demonstrate thorough understanding of the writing task through the use of effective word choice, sentence variety, and engaging voice; and 4. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. extend ideas in texts by making inferences and drawing conclusions based on textual evidence; 3. identify an author’s intent and purpose; and 4. research topics by selecting relevant information in a variety of sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with clear central ideas, sufficient elaboration, and appropriate evidence from texts; 2. create compositions with a clear organizational structure and logical order; 3. demonstrate understanding of the writing task, through the use of interesting language, varied sentence structure and clear voice; and 4. demonstrate reasonable command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate a general understanding of what they read; 2. extend ideas in texts by making simple inferences; and 3. research topics by locating information in a variety of sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with central ideas, some elaboration and evidence from text, and observable organization; 2. demonstrate awareness of the writing task through the use of generic vocabulary, some sentence variety, and voice; and 3. demonstrate some control of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate a partial understanding of what they read; 2. identify obvious meanings in texts and make limited inferences; and 3. research topics by locating information in commonly used resources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with vague central ideas, little elaboration or evidence from texts, and weak organization; 2. demonstrate limited understanding of the writing task through use of simple vocabulary, simple sentences, and little voice; and 3. demonstrate little control of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level generally have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students at this level have not exhibited the ability to: 1. demonstrate an overall understanding of what they read; 2. extend ideas in texts and draw conclusions; or 3. locate appropriate information in commonly used resources. In the area of writing, students at this level have not exhibited the ability to: 1. develop responses with central ideas, elaboration, relevant evidence from texts, and observable organization; 2. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of appropriate vocabulary, some variety in sentence structure and voice; and 3. demonstrate acceptable control of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. B. Grade 4 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. apply whole numbers, fractions, and decimals to solve complex and non- routine real- life problems; 2. solve word problems leading to one- step equations; 3. demonstrate fluency by selecting and using appropriate units and tools of measurement; 4. construct angles having a specific measure and identify acute, right, and obtuse angles that are part of a larger diagram or picture; 5. create, analyze, and interpret various representations of data; 6. identify missing, non- consecutive elements in a number pattern; and 7. draw logical conclusions and justify answers and solution processes by clearly and concisely explaining the procedures and the rationale for using them. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 18 Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use place- value representations, perform computations, and order whole numbers; 2. conceptually understand and model fractions and decimals and their relationships; 3. solve one- step equations with whole numbers; 4. use number sentences to represent and solve real- life problems; 5. select and use appropriate units of measure for lengths and shapes, including volume, and apply basic unit conversions; 6. draw, identify, and classify angles that are acute, right, and obtuse; 7. create, use, and interpret various representations of data including graphs and charts; 8. identify missing elements in a number pattern; 9. employ problem- solving strategies such as identifying appropriate information and modeling; and 10. organize and present solutions with supporting information and explanations of how they were achieved. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. read, write, compare, and perform simple computations with whole numbers; 2. show a working understanding of fractions and decimals and their relationships; 3. solve one- step equations with no context and some simple real- life problems; 4. demonstrate a working knowledge of unit conversions related to length, area, and volume; 5. identify and classify angles that are acute, right, and obtuse; 6. use and interpret some representations of data; 7. identify missing internal elements of a number pattern; and 8. provide explanatory responses with limited supporting information. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. read, write, and perform simple computations with whole numbers; 2. recognize fractions and decimals; 3. solve simple one- step equations with no context; 4. perform basic measurements and some common conversions; 5. recognize acute, right, and obtuse angles; 6. identify missing internal elements of a simple number pattern; and 7. provide written responses with minimal or no support. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to: 1. read, write, and perform simple computations with whole numbers; 2. recognize fractions and decimals; 3, solve simple one- step equations; 4, perform basic measurements and some common conversions; 5, recognize acute, right, and obtuse angles; 6, identify missing internal elements of a simple number pattern; and 7. provide written responses. C. Grade 4 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. design and carry out scientific investigations by selecting and using appropriate tools, technology, and techniques/ methods; 2. formulate appropriate questions that demonstrate critical thinking and a broad base of scientific knowledge; 3. interpret relationships and make inferences based on data and apply to new situations; 4. organize data in graphic form, evaluate validity of data, and draw/ justify conclusions based on data; 5. develop, elaborate, and modify predictions, models, and explanations; 6. use/ apply concepts about properties of objects/ materials, position/ motion of objects, and forms of energy to new ideas/ situations; 7. use/ apply concepts about characteristics, life cycles, and environments of organisms to recognize, and analyze observed phenomena; 8. use/ apply concepts about properties of Earth materials, weather, and objects in the night sky to predict/ justify patterns and relationships; and 9. use/ apply concepts about interrelationships among the human, biological, chemical, and physical aspects of the environment. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. design and carry out scientific investigations using appropriate methods, tools, technology, and techniques; 2. formulate appropriate questions demonstrating broad base of scientific knowledge; 3. identify relationships based on data and apply to new situations; 4. organize data in a graphic form, draw conclusions, justify conclusions, and make predictions based on data; 5. explain and connect concepts about properties of objects/ materials, position/ motion of objects, and formation of energy; 6. explain and connect concepts about characteristics, life cycles, and environments of organisms; 7. explain and connect concepts about properties of Earth materials, weather, and objects in the night sky; and 8. explain and connect concepts about the interrelationships among the human, biological, chemical, and physical aspects of the environment. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. perform simple scientific tasks when given clear, sequential directions; 2. recognize questions that are appropriate to investigation; 3. organize and present data in a graphic form and draw conclusions based on data; 4. demonstrate basic knowledge/ understanding of properties of objects, motion of objects, and forms of energy as they apply to their everyday life; 5. demonstrate basic knowledge/ understanding of characteristics, life cycles, and environments of organisms and relationships; 6. demonstrate knowledge/ understanding of basic concepts of properties of Earth materials, weather, and objects in the night sky; and 7. demonstrate knowledge/ understanding of basic components of an ecosystem and recognize how change impacts the system. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. perform portions of simple scientific tasks when given clear, sequential directions; 2. read/ interpret some data in a graphic form; 3. respond to simple directed questions; 4. exhibit partial understanding of properties of objects, motion of objects, and forms of energy as they apply to their everyday life; 5. exhibit partial understanding of characteristics, life cycles, and environments of organisms and relationships; 6. exhibit partial understanding of basic concepts of properties of Earth materials, weather, and objects in the night sky; and 7. exhibit partial understanding of basic components of ecosystems and recognize how change impacts systems. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 19 dministrative Code April 2015 Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to: 1. perform portions of simple scientific tasks when given clear, sequential directions; 2. read/ interpret some data in a graphic form; 3. respond to simple directed questions; 4. exhibit partial understanding of properties of objects, motion of objects, and forms of energy as they apply to their everyday life; 5. exhibit partial understanding of characteristics, life cycles, and environments of organisms and relationships; 6. exhibit partial understanding of basic concepts of properties of Earth materials, weather, and objects in the night sky; and 7. exhibit partial understanding of basic components of ecosystems and recognize how change impacts systems. D. Grade 4 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: Geography: 1. interpret major geographic features on maps and globes; 2. classify geographic vocabulary; 3. analyze the connection between people; 4. compare geographical data; 5. compare the world in spatial terms; and 6. compare processes that shape Earth. Civics: 1. evaluate the structure and purpose of government; and 2. interpret rights as stated in the U. S. Constitution. Economics: 1. evaluate the economic factors involved in a choice or a decision; and 2. analyze decisions made by individuals, households, businesses, and governments and their economic outcomes. History: 1. express the significance of key historical people, events, and documents; 2. use an understanding of historical perspective, time, and chronology to analyze past and current events; 3. interpret both primary and secondary sources; and 4. evaluate the social and economic impact of major scientific and technological advancements. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to Geography: 1. analyze and compare major geographic features on maps and globes; 2. compare the connection between people and the environment; 3. classify geographical data; 4. describe the world in spatial terms; and 5. describe processes that shape Earth. Civics: 1. explain the branches and responsibilities of government; and 2. explain rights and responsibilities of citizens as stated in the U. S. Constitution. Economics: 1. apply economic concepts; 2. explain how individuals, households, businesses, and governments are dependent on each other; and 3. demonstrate an understanding of the economic outcomes of decisions made by individuals, households, businesses, and governments. History: 1. identify and describe key historical people, events, and documents; 2. apply an understanding of historical perspective, time, and chronology; 3. interpret primary and secondary sources; and 4. explain the importance of major scientific and technological advancements. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: Geography: 1. recognize major geographic features on maps and globes; 2. define geographic vocabulary; 3. describe the connection between people and the environment; 4. interpret geographical data; 1. define the world in spatial terms; and 2. define processes that shape Earth. Civics: 1. identify branches and major responsibilities of government; and 2. list the rights and responsibilities of citizens as stated in the Bill of Rights. Economics: 1. identify fundamental economic concepts and terms; and 2. recognize that the decisions made by individuals, households, businesses, and governments result in economic outcomes. History: 1. identify and describe some important people, events, and documents in American history; 2. demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of historical perspective and time; 3. distinguish between primary and secondary historical sources; and 4. describe some scientific and technological advancements. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: Geography: 1. identify major geographic features on maps and globes; 2. select words that define geographic vocabulary; 3. explain the connection between people, places, man, and the environment; 4. identify geographical data; 2. identify the world in spatial terms; and 3. identify processes that shape Earth. Civics: 1. recognize that the United States has a government that is divided into branches; and 2. state that citizens have rights and responsibilities. Economics: 1. identify some fundamental economic concepts and terms. History: 1. recognize a few of the most important people, events, and documents in American history; 2. demonstrate a limited understanding of the concepts of historical perspective and time; and 3. identify some important scientific and technological advancements. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to: Geography: 1. identify major geographic features on maps and globes; 2. select words that define geographic vocabulary; 3. explain the connection between people, places, man, and the environment; 4. identify geographical data; 5. identify the world in spatial terms; and 6. identify processes that shape Earth. Civics: 1. recognize that the United States has a government that is divided into branches; and 2. state that citizens have rights and responsibilities. Economics: 1. identify some fundamental economic concepts and terms. History: 1. recognize a few of the most important people, events, and documents in American history; 2. demonstrate a limited understanding of the concepts of historical perspective and time; and 3. identify some important scientific and technological advancements. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 20 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1536 ( July 2005), amended LR 36: 968 ( May 2010), LR 39: 1423 ( June 2013). § 1129. Grade 8 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 8 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills: In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate a thorough understanding of what they read; 2. analyze more complex literary elements, such as the development of theme; 3. examine an author’s viewpoint supported by relevant examples from texts; and 4. evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of information from multiple sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with sharply focused central ideas, thorough elaboration, and well- chosen evidence from texts; 2. create compositions that show evidence of planning and a sense of wholeness; 3. demonstrate thorough understanding of the writing task through the use of effective word choice, varied sentence structures, and compelling voice that employs a wide range of strategies ( e. g., analogies, anecdotes, figurative language); and 4. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read, including inferential information; 2. interpret implied main ideas; 3. analyze author’s purpose and the devices used when composing texts; and 4. research topics by selecting and analyzing information from various sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with focused central ideas, sufficient elaboration, and relevant evidence from texts; 2. create compositions that are well- organized; 3. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of varied word choice and sentence structure and voice that incorporates some strategies ( e. g., examples, descriptive language); and 4. demonstrate reasonable command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate a general understanding of what they read; 2. extend the ideas in texts by making inferences and drawing conclusions; 3. identify an author’s purpose for composing a text; and 4. research topics by selecting and using information from various sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with central ideas, some supporting details and evidence from texts, and appropriate organization; 2. demonstrate awareness of the writing task through the use of appropriate but general language, some sentence variety, and voice; and 3. demonstrate some control of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate a partial understanding of what they read; 2. extend ideas in texts by making simple inferences; and 3. research topics by locating some information from commonly used sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. develop responses with vague central ideas, few or irrelevant supporting details, little evidence from texts, and weak organization; 2. demonstrate limited understanding of the writing task through the use of simple or inappropriate vocabulary, simple sentences, and little voice; and 3. demonstrate little control of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level generally have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students at this level have not exhibited the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. make interpretations and extensions of ideas in texts; or 3. locate information in commonly used resources. In the area of writing, students at this level have not exhibited the ability to: 1. develop written responses with central ideas, appropriate elaboration and evidence from texts, and observable organization; 2. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of appropriate grade- level vocabulary, varied sentences, and voice; or 3. demonstrate acceptable control of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. B. Grade 8 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use and manipulate positive and negative rational numbers in various forms including numbers with whole number exponents and scientific notation, in abstract and application problems; 2. express linear functions using all representations including tables, graphs, equations, and word forms; 3. apply proportional reasoning and unit rates to model, and solve complex and real- life problems; 4. probe examples and counterexamples in order to shape generalizations from which they can develop models; 5. use number sense and geometric awareness to consider the reasonableness of an answer; and 6. explain the reasoning processes underlying their conclusions. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare positive and negative rational numbers in various forms including whole number exponents, and scientific notation, and use rational numbers in multi- step problems; 2. express linear functions using multiple representations including tables, graphs, equations, and word forms; 3. apply proportional reasoning and unit rates to solve real- life problems; 4. use quantities such as volume and surface area and spatial relationships in problem solving and reasoning; 5. analyze patterns of change in various representations, and label as linear/ arithmetic or exponential/ geometric; 6. apply properties of informal geometry; 7. sketch and interpret trend lines; 8. accurately use the tools of technology; and 9. logically create and defend their ideas as well as give supporting examples. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 21 dministrative Code April 2015 Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare some rational numbers, and use them to solve basic problems; 2. understand connections to one or two other forms of linear functions; 3. apply proportional reasoning and unit rates to solve basic problems; 4. use quantities such as volume and surface areas and spatial relationships in simple or no- context problems; 5. use fundamental algebraic and informal geometric concepts in problem solving; 6. solve routine real- life problems through the appropriate selection and use of strategies and technological tools; and 7. defend mathematical ideas and provide limited supporting examples. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare some forms of rational numbers, and use them to solve basic problems; 2. interpret and represent simple linear functions; 3. calculate basic unit rates; 4. complete problems correctly with the help of prompts such as diagrams, charts, and graphs; 5. solve one- step problems involving basic computation; 6. recognize basic geometric figures; 7. recognize simple, obvious patterns; 8. use the tools of technology; 9. apply conceptual knowledge on a limited basis; and 10. provide written responses with minimal or no support. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level generally have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to: 1. compare some forms of rational numbers, and use them to solve basic problems; 2. interpret and represent simple linear functions; 3. calculate basic unit rates; 4. complete problems correctly with the help of prompts such as diagrams, charts, and graphs; 5. solve one- step problems involving basic computation; 6. recognize basic geometric figures; 7. recognize simple, obvious patterns; 8. use the tools of technology; 9. apply conceptual knowledge on a limited basis; and 10. provide written responses. C. Grade 8 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use abstract concepts/ theories to explain everyday situations, 2. describe many elements of a system and explain the limits of a particular example, 3. design complex models, and 4. demonstrate an understanding of the nature and limits of science and understand that science is subject to change. When given a problem, students at this level can design a simple investigation by: 1. asking appropriate questions and identifying those questions that are testable and not testable; 2. manipulating variables; 3. using mathematics and appropriate tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data; 4. relating several variables to explain phenomena; and 5. developing descriptions, explanations, and appropriate displays to communicate and defend data. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. understand complex concepts/ theories and communicate them, 2. demonstrate an understanding of elements of the system, 3. demonstrate understanding of models and diagrams, and 4. recognize various limits of science and its changes. When given a problem, students at this level can: 1. use a simple investigation, design an experiment, and link ideas while collecting data; 2. use mathematics and appropriate tools to design methods of display for data; and 3. draw conclusions from data. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. possess a fundamental knowledge of some theories and concepts; 2. identify elements of a system and state one limiting factor when given a particular example; 3. identify a simple model; 4. begin to understand the nature of science; and 5. show an awareness that science is subject to change. When given a problem, students at this level can: 1. design a simple investigation by asking appropriate questions; 2. identify the important variables and select appropriate tools to gather data; and 3. interpret basic data and communicate a conclusion. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify related elements of a system; 2. identify elements of a simple model; and 3. show some awareness that science is developing and changing. When given an investigation, students at this level can: 1. answer specific scientific questions; 2. identify at least one variable in an experiment; and 3. seek and identify basic scientific data and communicate it. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to: 1. identify related elements of a system; 2. identify elements of a simple model; and 3. show some awareness that science is developing and changing. When given an investigation, students at this level did not exhibit the ability to 1. answer specific scientific questions; 2. identify at least one variable in an experiment; and 3. seek and identify basic scientific data and communicate it. D. Grade 8 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to Geography: 1. apply extensive geographic knowledge, analytical concepts, and vocabulary; 2. analyze a variety of maps with a variety of scales and show the relationship between them; 3. use case studies for spatial analysis to develop maps and other graphics; 4. differentiate between patterns of climate, vegetation, and population across Earth’s surface and explain how regions change over time; and 5. profile regions by using geographical concepts, tools, and skills. Civics: 1. evaluate the importance of rules and laws, political parties, campaigns, and elections in the American political systems; 2. weigh the impact of American ideas and actions on the world; and 3. compare and contrast positions relating to the rights of citizens. Economics: 1. apply fundamental economic concepts, 2. analyze the role of governmental policies in competitive markets, and 3. examine the reasons for worldwide interdependence based on EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 22 historical and economic factors. History: 1. evaluate historical patterns as they relate to specific events, 2. make generalizations about historical topics using a variety of sources, and 3. develop an awareness of the political, social, and economic themes in history. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: Geography: 1. analyze a wide variety of physical and cultural features; 2. apply a fundamental geographic vocabulary; 3. compare information presented in different scales; 4. use geographic tools to translate information into patterns; 5. evaluate how human activity affects the environment; 6. interpret various patterns of trade and migration; and 7. solve location questions by integrating two or more sources. Civics: 1. compare and contrast the relationship between state and federal constitutions; 2. analyze the ways in which political and social conflict can be peacefully resolved; 3. interpret the impact of U. S. foreign policy on the world; and 4. analyze ways in which citizens help to shape politics and government at various levels. Economics: 1. apply fundamental economic concepts; 2. apply the meaning of economic indicators and their role in economics; 3. analyze various economic systems and their historical impact; and 4. evaluate the opportunity cost of economic decisions. History: 1. recognize historical connections between people and events; 2. distinguish between primary and secondary sources; 3. incorporate geographic, technological, and other reference material; and 4. communicate ideas about historical themes with supporting evidence. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: Geography: 1. utilize vocabulary of geographic concepts relating to patterns, relationships, distance, direction, and location; 2. use latitude and longitude to locate places; 3. identify continents, oceans, or selected countries and cities; 4. explain the differences between maps/ globes, read map scales and use an atlas/ almanac; 5. illustrate relationships that exist between the physical environment and human activity; 6. identify the distinguishing characteristics of a region; and 7. describe the movement of people, goods, services, and ideas. Civics: 1. explain the major purposes of government; 2. identify and explain the importance of basic principles of American constitutional democracy; 3. describe major foreign policy of the U. S.; and 4. describe the requirements of citizenship and naturalization in the U. S. Economics: 1. compare basic concepts related to economics; 2. explain the causes and consequences of economic decision making; 3. distinguish how specialization, skills, and knowledge affect the economic process; 4. compare various economic systems and their historical impacts; and 5. explain the role of supply and demand on production and distribution of goods and services. History: 1. identify and categorize people, places, events, and documents in historical context; 2. understand the impact of diverse cultures on American life; 3. explain the significance of major historical events; and 4. explain the fundamental political ideas and institutions of American life. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to Geography: 1. obtain information from geographic models; 2. draw a variety of maps; 3. memorize various geographic data; and 4. recognize that human activity is affected by the environment. Civics: 1. recognize types of government; 2. identify the basic principles of American constitutional democracy; 3. recognize a foreign policy issue; and 4. list the rights and responsibilities of American citizens. Economics: 1. identify basic concepts and vocabulary terms related to economics; and 2. discuss how supply and demand affects the price of goods and services. History: 1. identify historical people and places; 2. develop an awareness of diverse cultures in America; 3. name a variety of historical events; 4. recognize the fundamental political ideas and institutions of American life. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to Geography: 1. obtain information from geographic models; 2. draw a variety of maps; 3. memorize various geographic data; and 4. recognize that human activity is affected by the environment. Civics: 1. recognize types of government; 2. identify the basic principles of American constitutional democracy; 3. recognize a foreign policy issue; and 4. list the rights and responsibilities of American citizens. Economics: 1. identify basic concepts and vocabulary terms related to economics; and 2. discuss how supply and demand affects the price of goods and services. History: 1. identify historical people and places; 2. develop an awareness of diverse cultures in America; 3. name a variety of historical events; and 4. recognize the fundamental political ideas and institutions of American life. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1540 ( July 2005), amended LR 36: 974 ( May 2010), LR 39: 1424 ( June 2013). Subchapter D. LEAPAssessment Structure § 1141. Content Standards A. The LEAP tests measure knowledge and skills deemed necessary for students to become good scholars and productive citizens. This knowledge and these skills are reflected in the content standards that were approved in May 1997 by the SBESE. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 23 dministrative Code April 2015 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1545 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 236 ( February 2006). § 1143. English Language Arts Tests Structure A. The English Language Arts tests have four sessions. 1. Writing. The Writing session requires students to produce a composition about an assigned topic. Students are allowed to consult a dictionary and thesaurus during this session. The mode of writing assessed at a given grade ( grade 4, narrative and descriptive; grade 8, narrative and expository) may change between assessment administrations. The writing session measures key aspects of English Language Arts standards 2 and 3. a. Standard 2. Students write competently for a variety of purposes and audiences. b. Standard 3. Students communicate using: i. standard English grammar; ii. usage; iii. sentence structure; iv. punctuation; v. capitalization; vi. spelling; and vii. handwriting. 2. Using Information Resources. The Using Information Resources session requires students to complete a specified task designed to measure standard 5. a. Standard 5. Students locate, select, and synthesize information from a variety of texts, media, references, and technological sources to acquire and communicate knowledge. This session includes excerpts from four to seven reference sources, such as articles from encyclopedias, newspapers, and magazines; parts of books; visual aids ( maps, graphs, tables, illustrations); and electronic resources, such as a Web page. Students are instructed to skim through the reference materials to become familiar with the information available and then to locate the parts they need to answer multiple- choice and short- answer questions. 3. Reading and Responding. The Reading and Responding session includes four reading passages ( fiction, nonfiction, poetry) and multiple- choice and short- answer items. At grade 8, an essay question requires students to comprehend and respond to the content of at least two of the reading passages. Questions in this session measure key aspects of English Language Arts standards 1, 6, and 7. a. Standard 1. Students read, comprehend, and respond to a range of materials, using a variety of strategies for different purposes. b. Standard 6. Students read, analyze, and respond to literature as a record of life experiences. c. Standard 7. Students apply reasoning and problem- solving skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. Reading passages are grade- appropriate. Selections include the full text of shorter published works, fully developed excerpts from longer published works, or text written specifically for the test. The length of the reading passages falls within the range specified in the assessment framework for each grade. Selections for a given grade level reflect a balance among passage length, readability level, and interest level of the topic. Moreover, readability and passage length are balanced across the passages in each test. 4. Proofreading. The Proofreading session requires students to read a text that includes mistakes in grammar, usage, and mechanics and to answer multiple- choice questions that require choosing the best way to correct each mistake. Questions in this session measure key aspects of English Language Arts standard 3. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1545 ( July 2005). § 1145. Mathematics Tests Structure A. The Mathematics tests consist of two parts, divided into three sessions. 1. Part A uses a multiple- choice format to assess concepts and skills for all six strands of mathematics. Whenever possible, concepts and skills are assessed in real- life contexts. Part A is divided into two sessions: a. one to be completed without the aid of a calculator; and b. one for which calculator use is permitted. 2. Part B, which constitutes the third session, consists of four relatively complex mathematical tasks for grade 8 and three tasks for grade 4, all of which involve a number of separate steps and require application of multiple skills. These tasks may be ones for which there is more than one possible solution or more than one path to the solution. Ability to accomplish the mathematical tasks on part B of the test represents a higher level of mathematical literacy and performance. Each task in part B is scored on a 0 to 4 point scale. Question format for part B is open- ended, requiring numerical answers, short written answers, and other types of constructed response ( e. g., drawing a graph or geometrical pattern). Students may be required to explain how they arrived at their answers or justify their answers. Students' responses are scored analytically for such traits as accuracy of the answer, proper operations used, and appropriate problem- solving approach or strategy. Partial credit is given and calculators are permitted on part B at all grades. B. In the Louisiana Mathematics framework, each of six mathematics strands is associated with a single standard. 1. Strand N: Number and Number Relations EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 24 a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the real number system and communicate the relationships within that system using a variety of techniques and tools. 2. Strand A: Algebra a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of concepts and processes that allow them to analyze, represent, and describe relationships among variable quantities and to apply algebraic methods to real- world situations. 3. Strand M: Measurement a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, processes, and real- life applications of measurement. 4. Strand G: Geometry a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of geometric concepts and applications involving one-, two-, and three- dimensional geometry, and justify their findings. 5. Strand D: Data Analysis, Probability, and Discrete Math a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students discover trends, formulate conjectures regarding cause- and- effect relationships, and demonstrate critical- thinking skills in order to make informed decisions. 6. Strand P: Patterns, Relations, and Functions a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of patterns, relations, and functions that represent and explain real- world situations. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1545 ( July 2005). § 1147. Science Tests Structure A. The Science tests consist of three sessions. 1. Session 1 uses a multiple- choice format to assess concepts and skills in all five strands of science. 2. Session 2 consists of four short- answer questions that assess the four content strands: Physical Science, Life Science, Earth and Space Science, and Science and the Environment. These questions allow students to reflect on an idea, demonstrate their understanding of concepts and processes of science, make meaning of a given set of data, or critique the information. The wording of the questions is direct and specific, and the questions focus on the quality of the students' knowledge. 3. Session 3 consists of a comprehensive science task. At grade 4, students are required to observe, utilize, and react to materials in an investigation and to draw conclusions based on their experiences. At grade 8, students respond to a written scenario that requires scientific investigation. The task/ scenario integrates the Science as Inquiry strand with at least one other content strand. Questions in a variety of formats ( constructed response, data tables, short answer) throughout the activity set the stage and focus students on the topics and ideas to be covered, provide opportunities for students to record data and observations, and provide additional data about students' understanding of concepts and processes related to the task/ scenario. This structure creates a timely check for understanding and ensures that students who are unable to succeed at the beginning are not prevented from succeeding with latter portions of the activity. The activity includes three Science as Inquiry short- answer questions that allow students to interpret their results, react to their findings, and make decisions based on the information worked with throughout the activity. This activity also includes one essay question related to the content of the task/ scenario. B. According to the Louisiana science framework, five strands are measured throughout all three sessions of the test. Each of the five science strands is associated with a single standard. 1. Strand: Science as Inquiry a. Standard. Students will do science by engaging in partial and full inquiries that are within their developmental capabilities. 2. Strand: Physical Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the characteristics and interrelationships of matter and energy in the physical world. 3. Strand: Life Science a. Standard. Students will become aware of the characteristics and life cycles of organisms and understand their relationships to each other and to their environment. 4. Strand: Earth and Space Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the properties of earth materials, the structure of Earth's system, Earth's history, and Earth's place in the universe. 5. Strand: Science and the Environment a. Standard. In learning environmental science, students will develop an appreciation of the natural environment, learn the importance of environmental quality, and acquire a sense of stewardship. As consumers and citizens, they will be able to recognize how our personal, professional, and political actions affect the natural world. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1546 ( July 2005). § 1149. Social Studies Tests Structure A. The Social Studies tests consist of two parts, or sessions. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 25 dministrative Code April 2015 1. Part A, Session 1, consists of 50 multiple- choice test items for grade 4 and 60 multiple- choice items for grade 8 that assess knowledge, conceptual understanding, and application of skills in all four social studies strands ( i. e., Geography, Civics, Economics, and History). Items in part A are intermingled across strands. 2. Part B, Session 2, consists of four open- ended questions calling for a constructed response and requiring higher- order thinking in a social studies context ( e. g., grasping a concept, analyzing information, evaluating a principle, or applying a skill). Students may be required to construct or interpret a chart, graph, map, timeline, or other graphic representation; to supply a short written answer; or to produce a longer piece of writing in response to a social studies issue or problem. Each of the four constructed- response items represents one of the four social studies strands. Each task in part B is scored on a 0 to 4 point scale. B. Each of the four social studies strands is associated with a single standard. 1. Strand G― Geography: Physical and Cultural Systems a. Standard. Students develop a spatial understanding of Earth's surface and the processes that shape it, the connections between people and places, and the relationship between man and his environment. 2. Strand C― Civics: Citizenship and Government a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of the structure and purposes of government, the foundations of the American democratic system, and the role of the United States in the world while learning about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 3. Strand E― Economics: Interdependence and Decision Making a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of fundamental economic concepts as they apply to the interdependence and decision making of individuals, households, businesses, and governments in the United States and the world. 4. Strand H― History: Time, Continuity, and Change a. Standard. Students develop a sense of historical time and historical perspective as they study the history of their community, state, nation, and world. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1546 ( July 2005). § 1151. Retests and Rescores A. Double Jeopardy Rule. If a student scores at the required passing achievement level in LEAP English Language Arts or Mathematics during an administration and then retakes the test and scores below the required level on the retest administration, the passing score will be used to determine promotion. B. Rescores 1. The district test coordinator must file a request with the scoring contractor within 20 working days from the date the district receives the individual student scores. All requests must be made on or before the deadline date identified by the testing contractor and the LDE. Requests received after the deadline will not be honored. 2. Only rescores of tests from the most recent administration may be requested. 3. All requests for rescoring require a fee, which is established by and paid to the scoring contractor. 4. Students may request a rescore at specified achievement levels scaled score ranges and subject area of LEAP tests if the following criterion are met, the rescore will be expedited. a. English Language Arts and Mathematics― grades 4 and 8. The test has a scaled score five points below the Basic or Approaching Basic achievement level. C. Summer Retest. The summer retest is for students enrolled in grades 4 and 8 who need to be tested with LEAP for promotion to grades 5 and 9 the following fall. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1547 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 236 ( February 2006), LR 36: 974 ( May 2010). § 1153. Transfer Students A. The following rules apply for transfer students who are Louisiana residents transferring into Louisiana public schools from out- of- state schools, nonpublic schools, or approved home study programs. 1. Requirements for transfer students in grade 4 or 8 or those who are seeking to enroll in grade 5 or 9 who have never been in membership in a public school in Louisiana or who were in membership in Louisiana public schools and transferred out- of- state or who transferred from Louisiana nonpublic schools or from an approved home study program are as follows. a. A fourth or eighth grade student who transfers to a Louisiana public school before the spring administration of LEAP must take and pass the spring administration of LEAP English Language Arts and Mathematics ( ELA/ Math) tests. b. A fourth or eighth grade student who transfers to a Louisiana public school after the spring administration of the LEAP but before the end of the school year must take and pass the summer administration of the LEAP ( ELA/ Math) to be eligible for promotion to grade 5 or 9. c. A student who seeks to enroll in a Louisiana public school in grade 5 or grade 9 after the LEAP summer administration and before school starts must take and pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics portions of the placement test. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 26 d. A student who seeks to enroll in a Louisiana public school in grade 5 or grade 9 after school starts and before February 15 must take and pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics portions of the placement test. B. The following rules apply for transfer students who were out- of- state residents but have become Louisiana residents. 1. Requirements for transfer students in grade 4 or 8 who have never been in membership in a public school in Louisiana or who were in membership in a Louisiana public school( s) and transferred out- of- state are as follows. a. A fourth or eighth grade student who transfers to a Louisiana public school before the spring administration of LEAP must take and pass the spring administration of LEAP ( ELA/ Math). b. A fourth or eighth grade student who transfers to a Louisiana public school after the spring administration of the LEAP but before the end of the school year must take and pass the summer administration of the LEAP ( ELA/ Math) to be eligible for promotion to grade 5 or 9. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1547 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 236 ( February 2006). § 1155. Student Membership Determination A. Student membership is determined when a student in school is identified with the following minimum required identification elements: 1. state identification number; 2. full legal name; 3. date of birth; 4. sex; 5. race; 6. school district and school code; 7. entry date; and 8. grade placement. ( Adapted from Section 10, page 10.1, Student Information System User's Guide, LDE.) AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1547 ( July 2005). Chapter 13. Graduation Exit Examination Subchapter A. General Provisions § 1301. Introduction A. The GEE is a criterion- referenced testing program that is directly aligned with the state content standards, which by law are as rigorous as those of NAEP. This test measures how well a student has mastered the state content standards. The GEE initially is administered at grades 10 and 11. Initial testers generally take the English Language Arts test and the Mathematics test at grade 10 and the Science test and Social Studies test at grade 11. B. The last statewide administration was in the summer of 2014. The testing program then became the responsibility of the school districts, with the tests to be administered by the district. C. The GEE tests are to be administered by the district test coordinators each year in October and April, as indicated on the statewide testing schedule, to former high school students who have earned Carnegie units but still need to pass the GEE to earn a high school diploma. Students are required to take only those parts of the GEE in which they did not attain the required performance standards. D. All students who were enrolled in tenth grade for the first time in 2001- 2002 through the 2010- 2011 may be administered the test twice a year. There is no age limit for students who request a retest with GEE, nor is there a limit on the number of times the student may retake the test. E. If the student was issued a GED or HISET and later passes the GEE, the student may surrender the GED or HISET diploma and be issued a standard high school diploma. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 1)( c). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1548 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 236 ( February 2006), LR 40: 2513 ( December 2014). Subchapter B. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards § 1311. Achievement Levels A. 1. The Louisiana achievement levels are: a. Advanced; b. Mastery ( Exceeding the Standard); c. Basic ( Meeting the Standard); d. Approaching Basic ( Approaching the Standard); and e. Unsatisfactory. 2. Though the names of the achievement levels differ slightly from those detailed in the NCLB Act, the definitions are similar. The definitions of the Louisiana achievement levels are also consistent with the definitions of basic, proficient, and advanced in English language arts and mathematics for NAEP. B. Achievement Level Definitions 1. Advanced― a student at this level has demonstrated superior performance beyond the mastery level. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 27 dministrative Code April 2015 2. Mastery ( formerly Proficient)― a student at this level has demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter and is well prepared for the next level of schooling. 3. Basic― a student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 4. Approaching Basic― a student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 5. Unsatisfactory― a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 1) and ( C). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1548 ( July 2005). § 1313. Performance Standards A. Performance standards for GEE English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies tests are finalized in scaled- score form. The scaled scores range between 100 and 500 for all grades and content areas. B. GEE Achievement Levels and Scaled Score Ranges Achievement Level Grade 10 Grade 11 English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Advanced 398- 500 377- 500 396- 500 386- 500 Mastery 347- 397 346- 376 349- 395 344- 385 Basic 299- 346 305- 345 301- 348 297- 343 Approaching Basic 270- 298 286- 304 267- 300 275- 296 Unsatisfactory 100- 269 100- 285 100- 266 100- 274 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4 ( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1548 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 237 ( February 2006). Subchapter C. GEE Achievement Level Descriptors § 1323. Introduction A. Achievement level descriptors for Louisiana assessments were developed by committees composed of Louisiana educators who represented the subjects and grades assessed. They define what a student should know and be able to do at each achievement level for each subject assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4 ( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1548 ( July 2005). § 1325. Grade 10 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 10 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills: In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate thorough understanding of what they read and describe abstract themes and ideas; 2. analyze texts for meaning and form and support their analyses with specific examples; 3. extend ideas in texts by relating their experiences and to the world; and 4. research topics by selecting and evaluating information from various sources. In the area of writing, students 1. express analytical, critical, and/ or creative thinking in response to a writing task; 2. develop effective responses that demonstrate sharply focused central ideas, cohesive organization, and elaboration with illustrative, supporting details; 3. demonstrate audience awareness through the use of rich vocabulary and a clear personal style or voice; and 4. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills: In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate overall understanding of what they read including inferential and literal information; 2. analyze an author’s use of literary devices; 3. extend ideas in texts by making inferences, drawing conclusions, and making clear connections to personal experiences and other readings; and 4. research topics by selecting and analyzing information from various sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. express critical, analytical, and/ or creative thinking in response to a writing task; 2. develop effective responses with focused central ideas, logical organization, and convincing elaboration; 3. demonstrate awareness of the intended audience through use of varied word choice ( vocabulary) and sentence structure; and 4. demonstrate reasonable command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills: In the areas of reading and use of resources, students: 1. demonstrate overall understanding of what they read and make some interpretations; 2. identify elements of texts and an author’s style; 3. extend ideas in texts by making simple inferences and some, connections to personal experiences; and 4. research topics by selecting and using information in various sources. In the area of writing, students: 1. demonstrate some evidence of critical, analytical, and/ or creative thinking in response to a writing task; 2. develop responses with central ideas, evidence of conscious organization, and some supporting details; 3. demonstrate audience awareness through a sense of personal style or voice and some variety in vocabulary and sentence structure; and 4. make some errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization that interfere with communication to the reader. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 28 Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the following skills: In the areas of reading and use of resources, students 1. demonstrate a partial understanding of what they read; 2. identify some elements of an author’s style; 3. make simple or broad connections between texts and their personal experiences; and 4. research topics by locating information in commonly used sources. In the area of writing, students 1. demonstrate a limited responses to a writing task; 2. develop responses with unfocused central ideas, and minimal elaboration or supporting details; 3. demonstrate limited audience awareness through use of weak personal style or voice, simple or inappropriate vocabulary, and simple sentences; and 4. demonstrate inconsistent or little command of spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level generally have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. In the areas of reading and use of resources, students at this level have not exhibited the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. identify simple elements of an author’s style; 3. make connections between ideas in texts and personal experiences; or 4. research topics by locating information in commonly used sources. In the area of writing, students at this level have not exhibited the ability to: 1. express ideas in response to a writing task; 2. develop a central idea with focus, observable organization, or sufficient elaboration; 3. show audience awareness through the use of appropriate vocabulary and varied sentence structure; or 4. demonstrate acceptable command of spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. B. Grade 10 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. understand the function concept and are able to communicate and apply the numeric, algebraic, and graphical properties of functions; 2. apply their knowledge of algebra, geometry, and statistics to solve problems in more advanced areas of continuous and discrete mathematics; 3. formulate generalizations and create models through probing examples and counter examples; and 4. communicate their mathematical reasoning through the clear, concise, and correct use of mathematical symbolism and logical thinking. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of algebraic, statistical, geometric, and spatial reasoning; 2. simplify algebraic expressions; justify geometric relationships; and judge and defend the reasonableness of answers as applied to real- world situations; 3. analyze and interpret data in various forms; 4. understand and use elements of the linear function concept in symbolic, graphical, and tabular form; and 5. make conjectures, defend ideas, and give supporting examples. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use estimation to verify solutions and determine the reasonableness of results as applied to routine real- world problems; 2. use algebraic and geometric reasoning strategies to solve problems; 3. recognize relationships presented in verbal, algebraic, tabular, and graphical forms; 4. demonstrate knowledge of geometric relationships and corresponding measurement skills; 5. apply statistical reasoning in the organization and display of data and in reading tables and graphs; 6. use correct mathematical language and symbols to communicate mathematical relationships and reasoning processes; and 7 use calculators appropriately to solve problems. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use estimation and measurement to verify solutions and determine the reasonableness of results as applied to routine real- world problems; 2. show limited use of fundamental algebraic, geometric, and statistical reasoning in problem solving; 3. interpret data presented in various forms; 4. show limited skills in communicating mathematically; and 5. demonstrate limited application of conceptual knowledge. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level have generally have not exhibited the ability to: 1. use estimation and measurement to verify solutions and determine the reasonableness of results as applied to routine real- world problems; 2. use fundamental algebraic, geometric, and statistical reasoning in problem solving; 3. interpret data presented in various forms; 4. communicate mathematically; and 5. apply conceptual knowledge. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 4 ( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1548 ( July 2005), amended LR 36: 974 ( May 2010). § 1327. Grade 11 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 11 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. have a qualitative and quantitative grasp of scientific principles, relating them to one another and to other phenomena, and being aware of their development and limitations; 2. formulate scientific questions, compare experimental designs, and devise valid experiments to answer their questions; 3. collect the relevant quantitative and qualitative data using appropriate instrumentation; 4. provide a scientifically valid interpretation of the data they collect; 5. engage in self assessment, discard unnecessary data, and recognize gaps in information; 6. locate needed information in primary or secondary sources; and 7. communicate their ideas by interpolating, extrapolating, and interpreting patterns of change in graphic and symbolic representations. With inquiry as the core, students at the Advanced level demonstrate an understanding that unifying concepts and processes can be applied throughout the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 29 dministrative Code April 2015 Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. grasp scientific principles on both a qualitative and quantitative basis, 2. understand that scientific knowledge is tentative and subject to change, 3. identify more than one way to solve a given problem and select the method with the most promise, 4. manipulate data through various mathematical models, 5. integrate several abstract facts in order to understand overarching scientific principles, and 6. apply those principles to human activities. With inquiry as the core, students at the Mastery level will identify unifying concepts and processes among the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. formulate valid hypotheses; 2. design a simple experiment; 3. draw appropriate conclusions; 4. develop inferences from experimentation and apply that information to new situations; 5. distinguish scientific principles from pseudoscience; and 6. apply scientific principles to their everyday lives. With inquiry as the core, students at the Basic level begin to identify unifying concepts and processes among the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. know and understand fundamental science facts and concepts concerning the world; and 2. conduct a simple experiment that includes making observations; forming a reasonable hypothesis; identifying variables; collecting, displaying, and interpreting data; and drawing conclusions. These skills should be demonstrated through the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to: 1. know and understand fundamental science facts and concepts concerning the world; and 2. conduct a simple experiment that includes making observations; forming a reasonable hypothesis; identifying variables; collecting, displaying, and interpreting data; and drawing conclusions. These skills should be demonstrated through the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. B. Grade 11 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to Geography: 1. organize geographical data; 2. analyze the physical structure of the planet; and 3. evaluate the spatial relationship between humans and their environment. Civics: 1. compare and contrast structure and purpose of government; 2. interpret and evaluate foundations of the American political system; 3. analyze international relationships; and 4. evaluate the roles of citizens. Economics: 1. apply fundamental economic concepts; 2. evaluate decisions made by consumers; and 3. evaluate U. S. fiscal and monetary policies. History: 1. analyze continuity and change; 2. analyze people, places, events, ideas, and documents; 3. evaluate relevant experiences from the past to critique understanding of contemporary issues; and 4. evaluate the role of evidence in making an historical argument. Mastery Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to Geography: 1. classify geographical data; 2. examine the physical structure of the planet; and 3. compare spatial relationships between humans and their environment. Civics: 1. examine the structure and purpose of government; 2. discuss the foundation of the American political system; 3. interpret international relationships; and 4. examine the roles of citizens. Economics: 1. analyze fundamental economic concepts; 2. discuss decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government; and 3. analyze U. S. fiscal and monetary policies. History: 1. examine the role of continuity and of change in history; 2. examine the significance of people, places, events, ideas, and documents in history; 3. analyze relevant experience from the past to understanding of contemporary issues; and 4. analyze the role of evidence in making an historical argument. Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to Geography: 1. interpret geographical data; 2. describe the basic physical structure of the planet; and 3. explain the spatial relationships between humans and their environment. Civics: 1. explain structure and purposes of government; 2. describe the foundations of the American political system; 3. explain international relationships; and 4. discuss the roles of citizens. Economics: 1. discuss fundamental economic concepts; 2. explain decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government; and 3. explain U. S. fiscal policy. History: 1. describe continuity and change; 2. describe the significance of people, places, events, ideas, and documents; 3. examine relevant experiences from the past to contemporary issues; and 4. explain the role of evidence in making an historical argument. Approaching Basic Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to Geography: 1. identify geographical data; 2. recognize the physical structure of the planet; and 3. state the spatial relationships between humans and their environment. Civics: 1. identify the structure and purposes of government; 2. recognize the foundations of the American political system; 3. identify international relationships; and 4. identify the roles of citizens. Economics: 1. identify fundamental economic concepts; 2. identify decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government; and 3. identify U. S. fiscal and monetary policies. History: 1. recognize continuity and change; 2. recognize the significance of people, places, events, ideas, and documents; 3. identify relevant experiences from the past to describe contemporary issues; and EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 30 4. recognize the role of evidence in making an historical argument. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at this level have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally have not exhibited the ability to Geography: 1. identify geographical data; 2. recognize the physical structure of the planet; and 3. state the spatial relationships between humans and their environment. Civics: 1. identify the structure and purposes of government; 2. recognize the foundations of the American political system; 3. identify international relationships; and 4. identify the roles of citizens. Economics: 1. identify fundamental economic concepts; 2. identify decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government; and 3. identify U. S. fiscal and monetary policies. History: 1. recognize continuity and change; 2. recognize the significance of people, places, events, ideas, and documents; 3. identify relevant experiences from the past to describe contemporary issues; and 4. recognize the role of evidence in making an historical argument. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 and R. S. 17: 391.4 ( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1550 ( July 2005), amended LR 36: 975 ( May 2010). Subchapter D. GEE Assessment Structure § 1335. Content Standards A. The GEE tests measure knowledge and skills deemed necessary for students to become good scholars and productive citizens. This knowledge and these skills are reflected in the content standards that were approved in May 1997 by the SBESE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1552 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 237 ( February 2006). § 1337. English Language Arts Tests Structure A. The English Language Arts tests have four sessions. 1. Writing. The Writing session requires students to produce a composition about an assigned topic. Students are allowed to consult a dictionary and thesaurus during this session. The particular mode of writing assessed at a given grade ( grade 10, persuasive and expository) may change between assessment administrations. The Writing session measures key aspects of English Language Arts standards 2 and 3. a. Standard 2. Students write competently for a variety of purposes and audiences. b. Standard 3. Students communicate using: i. standard English grammar; ii. usage; iii. sentence structure; iv. punctuation; v. capitalization; vi. spelling; and vii. handwriting. 2. Using Information Resources. The Using Information Resources session requires students to complete a specified task designed to measure standard 5. a. Standard 5. Students locate, select, and synthesize information from a variety of texts, media, references, and technological sources to acquire and communicate knowledge. This session includes excerpts from four to seven reference sources, such as articles from encyclopedias, newspapers, and magazines; parts of books; visual aids ( maps, graphs, tables, illustrations); and electronic resources, such as a Web page. Students are instructed to skim through the reference materials to become familiar with the information available and then to locate the parts they need to answer multiple- choice and short- answer questions. 3. Reading and Responding. The Reading and Responding session includes four reading passages ( fiction, nonfiction, poetry) and multiple- choice and short- answer items. At grade 10, an essay question requires students to comprehend and respond to the content of at least two of the reading passages. Questions in this session measure key aspects of standards 1, 6, and 7. a. Standard 1. Students read, comprehend, and respond to a range of materials, using a variety of strategies for different purposes. b. Standard 6. Students read, analyze, and respond to literature as a record of life experiences. c. Standard 7. Students apply reasoning and problem- solving skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. Reading passages are grade- appropriate. Selections include the full text of shorter published works, fully developed excerpts from longer published works, or text written specifically for the test. The length of the reading passages falls within the range specified in the assessment framework for each grade. i. Selections for a given grade level reflect a balance among passage length, readability level, and interest level of the topic. Moreover, readability and passage length are balanced across the passages in each test. 4. Proofreading. The Proofreading session requires students to read a text that includes mistakes in grammar, usage, and mechanics and to answer multiple- choice questions that require choosing the best way to correct each mistake. Questions in this session measure key aspects of standard 3. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 31 dministrative Code April 2015 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1552 ( July 2005). § 1339. Mathematics Tests Structure A. The Mathematics tests consist of two parts, divided into three sessions. 1. Part A uses a multiple- choice format to assess concepts and skills for all six strands of mathematics. Whenever possible, concepts and skills are assessed in real- life contexts. Part A is divided into two sessions: a. one to be completed without the aid of a calculator; and b. one for which calculator use is permitted. 2. Part B, which constitutes the third session, consists of four relatively complex mathematical tasks for grade 10, all of which involve a number of separate steps and require application of multiple skills. These tasks may be ones for which there is more than one possible solution or more than one path to the solution. Ability to accomplish the mathematical tasks on part B of the test represents a higher level of mathematical literacy and performance. Each task in part B is scored on a 0 to 4 point scale. Question format for part B is open- ended, requiring numerical answers, short written answers, and other types of constructed response ( e. g., drawing a graph or geometrical pattern). Students may be required to explain how they arrived at their answers or justify their answers. Students' responses are scored analytically for such traits as accuracy of the answer, proper operations used, and appropriate problem- solving approach or strategy. Partial credit is given and calculators are permitted on part B at all grades. B. In the Louisiana Mathematics framework, each of six mathematics strands is associated with a single standard. 1. Strand N: Number and Number Relations a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the real number system and communicate the relationships within that system using a variety of techniques and tools. 2. Strand A: Algebra a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of concepts and processes that allow them to analyze, represent, and describe relationships among variable quantities and to apply algebraic methods to real- world situations. 3. Strand M: Measurement a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, processes, and real- life applications of measurement. 4. Strand G: Geometry a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of geometric concepts and applications involving one-, two-, and three- dimensional geometry, and justify their findings. 5. Strand D: Data Analysis, Probability, and Discrete Math a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students discover trends, formulate conjectures regarding cause- and- effect relationships, and demonstrate critical- thinking skills in order to make informed decisions. 6. Strand P: Patterns, Relations, and Functions a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of patterns, relations, and functions that represent and explain real- world situations. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1552 ( July 2005). § 1341. Science Test Structure A. The Science test consists of three sessions. 1. Session 1 uses a multiple- choice format to assess concepts and skills in all five strands of science. 2. Session 2 consists of four short- answer questions that assess the four content strands: Physical Science, Life Science, Earth and Space Science, and Science and the Environment. These questions allow students to reflect on an idea, demonstrate their understanding of concepts and processes of science, make meaning of a given set of data, or critique the information. The wording of the questions is direct and specific, and the questions focus on the quality of the students' knowledge. 3. Session 3 consists of a comprehensive science task. At grade 11, students respond to a written scenario that requires scientific investigation. The task/ scenario integrates the Science as Inquiry strand with at least one other content strand, at grade 11, Physical Science and Life Science only. Questions in a variety of formats ( constructed response, data tables, short answer) throughout the activity set the stage and focus students on the topics and ideas to be covered, provide opportunities for students to record data and observations, and provide additional data about students' understanding of concepts and processes related to the task/ scenario. This structure creates a timely check for understanding and ensures that students who are unable to succeed at the beginning are not prevented from succeeding with latter portions of the activity. The activity includes three Science as Inquiry short- answer questions that allow students to interpret their results, react to their findings, and make decisions based on the information worked with throughout the activity. This activity also includes one essay question related to the content of the task/ scenario. B. According to the Louisiana science framework, five strands are measured throughout all three sessions of the test. Each of the five science strands is associated with a single standard. 1. Strand: Science as Inquiry EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 32 a. Standard. Students will do science by engaging in partial and full inquiries that are within their developmental capabilities. 2. Strand: Physical Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the characteristics and interrelationships of matter and energy in the physical world. 3. Strand: Life Science a. Standard. Students will become aware of the characteristics and life cycles of organisms and understand their relationships to each other and to their environment. 4. Strand: Earth and Space Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the properties of earth materials, the structure of Earth's system, Earth's history, and Earth's place in the universe. 5. Strand: Science and the Environment a. Standard. In learning environmental science, students will develop an appreciation of the natural environment, learn the importance of environmental quality, and acquire a sense of stewardship. As consumers and citizens, they will be able to recognize how our personal, professional, and political actions affect the natural world. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1553 ( July 2005). § 1343. Social Studies Tests Structure A. The Social Studies tests consist of two parts, or sessions. 1. Part A consists of 60 multiple- choice items for grade 11 that assess knowledge, conceptual understanding, and application of skills in all four social studies strands ( Geography, Civics, Economics, and History). Items in part A are intermingled across strands. 2. Part B, Session 2, consists of four open- ended questions calling for a constructed response and requiring higher- order thinking in a social studies context ( grasping a concept, analyzing information, evaluating a principle, or applying a skill). Students may be required to construct or interpret a chart, graph, map, timeline, or other graphic representation; to supply a short written answer; or to produce a longer piece of writing in response to a social studies issue or problem. Each of the four constructed- response items represents one of the four social studies strands. Each task in part B is scored on a 0 to 4 point scale. B. Each of the four social studies strands is associated with a single standard. 1. Strand G― Geography: Physical and Cultural Systems a. Standard. Students develop a spatial understanding of Earth's surface and the processes that shape it, the connections between people and places, and the relationship between man and his environment. 2. Strand C― Civics: Citizenship and Government a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of the structure and purposes of government, the foundations of the American democratic system, and the role of the United States in the world while learning about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 3. Strand E― Economics: Interdependence and Decision Making a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of fundamental economic concepts as they apply to the interdependence and decision making of individuals, households, businesses, and governments in the United States and the world. 4. Strand H― History: Time, Continuity, and Change a. Standard. Students develop a sense of historical time and historical perspective as they study the history of their community, state, nation, and world. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1553 ( July 2005). § 1345. Double Jeopardy Rule A. If a school administers a GEE test that the student has already passed and the student scores unsatisfactory on the retest, the passing score will be used to determine the student's eligibility for a standard high school diploma. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1554 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 237 ( February 2006). § 1347. First and Second Cohorts A. The first cohort comprises students who were first- time tenth graders in 2000- 2001. First cohort students are required to score approaching basic or above on the GEE English Language Arts test and the GEE Mathematics test to be eligible for a standard high school diploma. B. The second cohort comprises students who were first- time tenth graders in 2001- 2002 and all first- time tenth graders thereafter. Second cohort students are required to score approaching basic or above on the GEE English Language Arts test and the GEE Mathematics test and to score approaching basic or above on either the GEE Science or Social Studies test to be eligible for a standard high school diploma. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1554 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 237 ( February 2006). Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 33 dministrative Code April 2015 § 1348. Last Cohorts A. First- time freshmen in 2009– 2010 comprise the last cohort of GEE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 38: 35 ( January 2012). § 1349. Rescores A. The district test coordinator must file a request with the scoring contractor within 20 working days from the date the school district receives the individual student scores. All requests must be made on or before the deadline date identified by the testing contractor and the LDE. Requests received after the deadline will not be honored. B. Only rescores of tests from the most recent administration may be requested. C. All requests for rescoring require a fee, which is established by and paid to the scoring contractor. D. Students may request a rescore of their GEE tests at specified achievement levels and scaled score ranges. If the following criterions are met, the rescore will be expedited. 1. English Language Arts and Mathematics. The test has a scaled score five points below the Approaching Basic achievement level. 2. Science and Social Studies. The test has a scaled score five points below the Approaching Basic achievement level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1554 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 237 ( February 2006), LR 36: 977 ( May 2010). § 1351. GEE Administration Rules A. Students enrolled in grade 10 for the first time must take GEE English Language Arts and Mathematics tests during the spring administration. B. Students repeating grade 10 shall take the GEE Science and Social Studies tests during the spring administration. C. Students enrolled in grade 11 for the first time must take GEE Science and Social Studies tests during the spring administration. D. Students enrolled in grade 11 shall take Science and Social Studies tests unless the student was enrolled in grade 11 for two years. E. Students promoted from grade 9 to grade 11 may take English Language Arts and Mathematics tests during the fall retest administration and then take the Science and Social Studies tests during the subsequent spring administration. F. Students in block schedules who are classified as tenth graders in the fall of their second year and as eleventh graders by the subsequent spring test administration are permitted to take all GEE content- area tests, English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies, for the first time during that spring test administration. G. If students enrolled in grade 12 have not yet met the GEE requirements to be eligible for a standard high school diploma, they may take all content- area tests, English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies, during both the fall and the February Seniors Only retest administrations. H. If students enrolled in grade 11 in the fall are promoted to grade 12 by January, they may take all content- area tests, English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies, during the February Seniors Only retest administration. I. If students enrolled in grade 12 are unable to retest during the February Seniors Only retest administration, they should retest during the spring administration. J. If a district holds " graduation" prior to the release of spring test scores, the LEA must have in place a policy for graduation without the test scores. K. There is no ending age limit for students to retest in GEE, nor is there a limit on the number of times the student may retake the test. Students who no longer reside in the school district where he/ she completed Carnegie units may test in the current school district of residence. The DTC shall forward the passing test scores to the high school where the Carnegie units reside. L. If a student was issued a GED diploma and subsequently meets the requirements of the GEE, the student may surrender the GED diploma and be issued a standard high school diploma. M. If students are transferring to a public high school from a nonpublic high school that administers the GEE, the rules for nonpublic transfer students apply. N. When administrative errors are made in testing, the state superintendent of education may determine how to remedy the error. O. Seniors who have completed all GEE tests required for a standard high school diploma and who wish to retest for the Louisiana high school diploma endorsements may retest during the fall retest administration. If the student is unable to test during the fall retest administration, the student may retest in the February seniors only retest. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1554 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 237 ( February 2006), LR 32: 391 ( March 2006), LR 34: 67 ( January 2008). § 1353. Summer Retest Administration A. Students who were enrolled in grades 10 and 11 for the first time during the spring test administration and did EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 34 not score approaching basic in the required GEE 21 tests are eligible for the summer retest administration. B. Students who were enrolled in grades 10 and 11 in public schools for the first time during the spring test administration but who were absent during testing are eligible for the summer retest administration. C. Students who enrolled in and attended grades 10 and 11 after the spring test administration and before the close of the regular academic year are eligible for the summer retest administration. D. Students who enroll in grades 10 and 11 after the close of the regular academic year but did not attend public schools during the academic year are not eligible for the summer retest administration. They must test during the fall retest administration. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1555 ( July 2005). § 1355. GEE Transfer Students A. The following rules apply for transfer students who are Louisiana residents transferring into the Louisiana public school district from out- of- state schools, nonpublic schools, or approved home study programs. 1. Requirements for students who have never been in membership in a Louisiana public school and are transferring from out- of- state schools, from Louisiana nonpublic schools, or from an approved home study program are as follows. a. A student who entered the ninth grade during the 1999- 2000 school year and thereafter and who transferred to a Louisiana public school at or below the ninth grade shall take and pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics sections and either the Science or the Social Studies test of GEE. b. A student who entered the ninth grade in 1999- 2000 and thereafter and who is classified by the local school district as a tenth grade student shall take and pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics tests and either the Science or the Social Studies test of GEE. c. A student who entered the ninth grade in 1999- 2000 and thereafter and who is classified by the local school district as an eleventh grade student shall take and pass either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. d. A student who entered the ninth grade in 1999- 2000 and thereafter and who is classified by the local school district as a twelfth grade student shall not be required to take any part of the GEE. 2. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a student in grades K through 6 shall adhere to the following policy. a. A student who returns in the seventh and/ or eighth grade for a period in membership of 160 days total shall take and pass both the English Language Arts and Mathematics tests and either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. b. A student who returns in the ninth grade shall take and pass both the English Language Arts and Mathematics tests and either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. c. A student who returns and is classified as a tenth grade student shall take and pass both the English Language Arts and Mathematics tests and either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. d. A student who returns and is classified as an eleventh grade student shall take and pass either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. e. A student who returns and is classified as a twelfth grade student shall not be required to take any part of the GEE. 3. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools in the seventh and/ or eighth grade for a period of 160 days total, transferred out, and subsequently returned at any grade level shall take and pass both the English Language Arts and Mathematics tests and either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. 4. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a ninth grade student, transferred out, and subsequently returned at any grade level shall be required to take and pass both the English Language Arts and Mathematics tests and either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. 5. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a tenth grade student, transferred out, and subsequently returned at any grade level shall take and pass both the English Language Arts and Mathematics tests and either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. 6. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as an eleventh grade student, transferred out, and subsequently returned at the eleventh- or twelfth- grade level shall take and pass either the Science or the Social Studies test of the GEE. 7. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a twelfth grade student, transferred out, and subsequently returned as a twelfth grader shall not be required to take any part of the GEE. 8. All membership in grades 7 through 11 must be considered when determining which test to administer to a student. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1555 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 238 ( February 2006), LR 34: 68 ( January 2008). Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 35 dministrative Code April 2015 § 1357. Student Membership Determination A. Student membership is determined when a student in school is identified with the following minimum required identification elements: 1. state identification number; 2. full legal name; 3. date of birth; 4. sex; 5. race; 6. district and school code; 7. entry date; and 8. grade placement. ( Adapted from Section 10, page 10.1, Student Information System User's Guide, LDE). B. A student must be in membership in a Louisiana public school( s) for 160 days per year or 80 days per semester in order to be eligible to receive grades ( 1103G, Bulletin 741, LDE). AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1556 ( July 2005). Chapter 15. Norm- Referenced Tests § 1501. Description A. The Louisiana Statewide Norm- Referenced Testing Program ( LSNRTP) was established in 1986 as a component of LEAP. The primary goal of the program is to provide parents, students, educators, and policymakers with normative data that may be used for evaluating student, school, and district performance. Test results are used by teachers and administrators to plan instructional programs that enhance educational opportunities for Louisiana students. The LSNRTP ended in 2005 with the last administration of The Iowa Tests. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1556 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 238 ( February 2006). Chapter 17. Integrated LEAP Subchapter A. General Provisions § 1700. Sunset Provision A. Beginning academic year 2010- 2011, grade 9 iLEAP tests will no longer be administered. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 37: 859 ( March 2011). § 1701. Introduction A. The NCLB Act requires the development of grade- level expectations ( GLEs) or grade- level content standards at grades 3- 8 for reading and mathematics. Louisiana has supplemented its existing content standards with grade- level expectations. To create a comprehensive system, Louisiana has developed GLEs in four content areas: English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies, for grade levels prekindergarten- 12. NCLB further requires standards- based tests ( or augmented norm- referenced tests) that measure the content standards. LEAP ( grades 4 and 8) and GEE ( grades 10 and 11) measure the content standards, and these tests will continue. To measure the standards and GLEs at grades 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9, however, the Integrated LEAP ( iLEAP) tests were used, beginning in spring 2006. The iLEAP tests replaced The Iowa Tests, which were used to evaluate student performance in grades 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 from spring 1998 to spring 2005. ( Spring 2010 was the last administration of grade 9 iLEAP). In accordance with NCLB timelines, the iLEAP tests were implemented spring 2006. Beginning in 2007- 2008, NCLB also requires tests in science: once in grades 3- 5, once in grades 6- 9, and once in grades 10- 12. The term integrated refers to the integration of standards- based tests ( CRTs) and norm- referenced tests ( NRTs) into one program. 1. Tests and Grade Levels for iLEAP Grade English Language Arts ( ELA) Math Science Social Studies 3 Augmented NRT Augmented NRT CRT CRT 5 Augmented NRT Augmented NRT CRT CRT 6 Augmented NRT Augmented NRT CRT CRT 7 Augmented NRT Augmented NRT CRT CRT 9 Augmented NRT Augmented NRT Not Assessed Not Assessed AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1556 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 238 ( February 2006), LR 33: 265 ( February 2007), LR 39: 75 ( January 2013). Subchapter B. iLEAP Test Design § 1703. Format A. All iLEAP tests are aligned to the GLEs, and student performance on the content standards is the primary reporting scheme. The iLEAP replaces the current NRTs with a survey battery ( short form) of the ITBS in English language arts and mathematics at grades 3, 5, 6, and 7. At grade 9, the NRT component of iLEAP includes the core battery of the ITED, with the exception of Math Computation. The NRT is augmented with a CRT component that measures state standards not measured on the ITBS and the ITED. Most of the items on the NRT form for a given grade align with the GLEs for that grade. The EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 36 iLEAP also includes Science and Social Studies tests at grades 3, 5, 6, and 7. The iLEAP Science and Social Studies tests are entirely criterion- referenced, aligned with state content standards and GLEs. The LDE elected to use CRTs for science and social studies to have the best measure of what students are learning in classrooms in these content areas. B. Overall Design of iLEAP 1. The NRT components for the Math and English Language Arts tests shall be administered as timed assessments using national standardized procedures. The CRT components for all four content areas are untimed; however, suggested times are provided. The abbreviations MC and CR in the chart refer to the types of items on the iLEAP; i. e., multiple- choice and constructed- response items. English Language Arts Math Science Social Studies Grades Assessed 3, 5, 6, 7, 9 3, 5, 6, 7, 9 3, 5, 6, 7 3, 5, 6, 7 Test Components and Item Types NRT: Survey Battery ( MC) grades 3, 5, 6, 7 Core Battery ( MC) grade 9 CRT: Using Information Resources ( MC) Writing Prompt ( CR) NRT: Survey Battery ( MC) grades 3, 5, 6, 7 Core Battery ( MC) grade 9 CRT: ( MC and CR) CRT: MC CRT: MC Number of Items NRT: varies by grade from approx. 70 to 140 CRT: 8 MC and 1 CR NRT: varies by grade from approx. 25 to 40 CRT: varies by grade from approx. 20 to 30 MC and 2 CR Varies by grade from approx. 40 to 48 MC Varies by grade from approx. 30 to 40 MC AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 265 ( February 2007). Subchapter C. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards § 1705. Introduction A. 1. Student performance on the CRT components of the iLEAP is reported in terms of achievement level: Advanced, Mastery, Basic, Approaching Basic, or Unsatisfactory. In addition, norm- referenced scores are reported for Math and English Language Arts. Grade- level committees of educators, mostly teachers, convened to review draft Achievement Level Descriptors ( ALDs) that were developed for iLEAP. They used a group- consensus procedure to review the draft descriptors and GLEs to make recommendations for wording that would most appropriately describe expectations for each achievement level and grade. B. On each test— English Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies— student performance will be reported in terms of achievement level. The Louisiana achievement levels are: 1. advanced; 2. mastery ( exceeding the standard); 3. basic ( meeting the standard); 4. approaching basic ( approaching the standard); and 5. unsatisfactory. C. Achievement Levels Definitions 1. Advanced— a student at this level has demonstrated superior performance beyond the mastery level. 2. Mastery ( formerly Proficient)— a student at this level has demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter and is well prepared for the next level of schooling. 3. Basic— a student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 4. Approaching Basic— a student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 5. Unsatisfactory— a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 266 ( February 2007). § 1707. Performance Standards A. Reporting of Scores 1. NRT score: a. percentile rank; b. national curve equivalent ( nce); c. standard score; d. stanine; e. includes all items on the NRT form. 2. CRT score: a. achievement level; b. includes CRT items and only those items on the NRT survey battery or on the NRT core battery that align with GLEs at or below the grade level assessed. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 37 dministrative Code April 2015 B. iLEAP Achievement Levels and Scaled Score Ranges― Grades 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Ranges Grade 3 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 9 Advanced 383– 500 386– 500 387– 500 383– 500 436– 500 Mastery 338– 382 341– 385 341– 386 344– 382 374– 435 Basic 282– 337 286– 340 280– 340 286– 343 291– 373 Approaching Basic 239– 281 247– 285 239– 279 236– 285 219– 290 Unsatisfactory 100– 238 100– 246 100– 238 100– 235 100– 218 Achievement Level Mathematics Scaled Score Ranges Grade 3 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 9 Advanced 386– 500 405– 500 394– 500 421– 500 393– 500 Mastery 343– 385 355– 404 358– 393 376– 420 360– 392 Basic 283– 342 282– 354 281– 357 292– 375 293– 359 Approaching Basic 245– 282 250– 281 248– 280 255– 291 263– 292 Unsatisfactory 100– 244 100– 249 100– 247 100– 254 100– 262 Achievement Level Science Scaled Score Ranges Grade 3 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 9 Advanced 382– 500 378– 500 380– 500 388– 500 Not Assessed Mastery 342– 381 341– 377 343– 379 348– 387 Basic 292– 341 292– 340 295– 342 302– 347 Approaching Basic 249– 291 248– 291 251– 294 259– 301 Unsatisfactory 100– 248 100– 247 100– 250 100– 258 Achievement Level Social Studies Scaled Score Ranges Grade 3 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 9 Advanced 396– 500 365– 500 364– 500 372– 500 Not Assessed Mastery 341– 395 339– 364 338– 363 339– 371 Basic 287– 340 289– 338 292– 337 293– 338 Approaching Basic 255– 286 257– 288 261– 291 262– 292 Unsatisfactory 100– 254 100– 256 100– 260 100– 261 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 266 ( February 2007). Subchapter D. iLEAP Achievement Level Descriptors § 1709. Introduction A. Achievement level descriptors for Louisiana assessments were developed by committees composed of Louisiana educators who represented the subjects and grades assessed. They define what a student should know and be able to do at each achievement level for each subject assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 990 ( June 2007). § 1711. Grade 3 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 3 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. determine meanings of unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies; 2. demonstrate inferential understanding of what they read by making generalizations and predictions, drawing conclusions, and extending ideas; 3. identify story elements, including theme, in a text; 4. research topics by locating, selecting, and evaluating appropriate information from multiple print and electronic resources for a specified purpose; 5. construct responses with focused central ideas, purposeful organization, thorough elaboration, well- chosen information from texts, and effective linking words; 6. demonstrate thorough understanding of the writing task through the use of effective vocabulary, varied sentences, and engaging voice; and 7. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 38 Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify words with multiple meanings using various strategies; 2. demonstrate an understanding of what they read by making inferences, summarizing information, and identifying cause/ effect relationships; 3. identify story elements, including conflict, in a text; 4. research topics by locating information from a variety of print and electronic resources for a specified purpose; 5. construct responses with clear central ideas, logical order, sufficient elaboration, appropriate information from texts, and some linking words; 6. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of interesting words and phrases, sentence variety, and clear voice; and 7. demonstrate reasonable command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify word meaning using knowledge of basic decoding skills; 2. demonstrate a general understanding of what they read by locating specific details and information, identifying main ideas, making simple inferences, and drawing simple conclusions; 3. identify simple story elements, including character motivations, in a text; 4. research topics by locating information from multiple commonly used print and electronic resources; 5. construct responses with central ideas, observable organization, some elaboration, and information from texts; 6. demonstrate awareness of the writing task through the use of grade- appropriate vocabulary and sentence structures, and voice; and 7. demonstrate some control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of some grade- appropriate vocabulary; 2. demonstrate a partial understanding of what they read by identifying main details, making simple predictions, and sequencing events; 3. identify basic literary elements, such as simple character traits, in a text; 4. research topics by locating information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 5. construct responses with vague central ideas, weak organization, and minimal detail and information from texts; 6. demonstrate limited understanding of the writing task through use of below grade- level vocabulary, simple sentences, and little voice; and 7. demonstrate little control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English Language Arts have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. locate information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 3. construct responses with focused central ideas, observable organization, and sufficient elaboration with supporting details and information from texts; 4. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of appropriate vocabulary, varied sentence structure, and voice; and 5. demonstrate acceptable control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. B. Grade 3 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. conceptually understand common fractions and the four basic operations, and use them to represent and solve real- life problems; 2. communicate thoughts, procedures, and solutions using mathematical language and symbols in complex problems; 3. select and use appropriate strategies and units of measurement to solve various real- life problems; 4. apply concepts of geometry to solve real- life problems; 5. represent and interpret data in multiple formats; 6. identify, extend, and explain complex patterns and relationships including growing patterns; and 7. use mathematical reasoning to connect procedures and concepts among different math topics. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. read, write, and model whole numbers and fractions, compare whole numbers, determine the value of bills and coins, and make change; 2. understand, model, and apply procedures of the four basic operations, and use commutative and associative properties; 3. select and use appropriate mathematical models, strategies, operations, words, and symbols to estimate and solve real- life problems; 4. use common strategies and units of measure to determine length, perimeter, area, capacity, and elapsed time; 5. classify basic geometric shapes and construct rectangles from given measurements; 6. draw logical conclusions and make predictions based on data in tables, graphs, maps, advertisements, etc.; and 7. identify and extend patterns and relations. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. read, write, and compare small whole numbers and determine the value of a small set of bills and coins; 2. use models to compare whole numbers, represent fractions, and conceptualize the four basic operations; 3. read mathematical words and symbols, and use the four basic operations to solve real- life problems; 4. measure objects using specified tools and units; 5. express working knowledge and vocabulary of two- and three- dimensional geometric objects; 6. make basic interpretations of data represented in tables, graphs, maps, advertisements, etc.; and 7. identify and extend patterns. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. read and write whole numbers and determine the value of a group of bills or a group of coins; 2. use common strategies and some basic operations to solve single- step problems; 3. recognize mathematical words and symbols; 4. identify measurement tools and units; 5. recognize basic two- dimensional shapes; 6. match data sets to representations as tables and charts; and 7. identify and extend simple patterns. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in Mathematics have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. read and write whole numbers and determine the value of a group of bills or a group of coins; 2. use common strategies and basic operations to solve problems; 3. recognize mathematical words and symbols; 4. identify measurement tools and units; 5. recognize basic two- dimensional shapes; 6. match data sets to representations as tables and charts; and 7. identify and extend simple patterns. C. Grade 3 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in science generally exhibit the ability to: Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 39 dministrative Code April 2015 1. generate, conduct, and compare simple investigations based on testable questions; make accurate observations using appropriate tools and resources; draw and evaluate conclusions; and communicate ideas, procedures, and data appropriately; 2. explain what is known and what is unknown in scientific investigations and compare the effects of scientific discoveries on society; 3. compare, classify, and relate objects and substances to their appropriate uses based on their properties and physical states; 4. explain how forces are pushes or pulls and analyze the relationships between motion, forces, and the masses of objects; 5. compare common forms of energy and describe the connections between different forms of energy as they are used; 6. describe how similar structures and functions meet the needs of different organisms and classify organisms in multiple ways; 7. explain how organs of the digestive system function and describe how the components of the skeletal function; 8. explain patterns affected by the apparent movement of the Sun and Earth and differentiate the planets of the solar system; 9. describe climate patterns; explain the water cycle, erosion, and weathering, differentiate types of rocks, soil components, and fossils; explain how fossils are used to determine the age of rocks; and compare the living and nonliving components in ecosystems; 10. classify manufactured goods; identify sources of resources; and explain how resources can be replenished, depleted, and conserved. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. describe simple investigations based on questions; make observations using appropriate tools and resources; draw conclusions; and communicate ideas, procedures, and data in a variety of ways; 2. identify what is known and what is unknown in scientific investigations and explain the effects of scientific discoveries on society; 3. compare, classify, and relate objects and substances to their properties and explain how matter changes physical states; 4. describe how forces are pushes or pulls and explain the relationships between the motion of objects and forces; 5. describe the characteristics of sound, light, and electricity and compare common forms of energy and their uses; 6. compare plant and animal structures and functions and classify organisms based on common characteristics; 7. describe the function of an organ in the digestive system and describe how the components of the skeletal system function; 8. describe patterns affected by the apparent movement of the Sun and Earth and identify, in order, the planets of the solar system; 9. describe climate patterns from recorded weather conditions, the water cycle, erosion, and weathering; 10. organize rocks by major types; compare soil components; identify fossil characteristics; and explain how fossils illustrate the past; 11. describe interrelationships of components of ecosystems and describe the effects of humans on organisms and the environment; and 12. classify manufactured goods by resource type and explain how resources can be replenished or depleted. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify testable questions and conduct simple investigations using directions; 2. use simple tools and resources to make and describe observations; draw conclusions based on data; and communicate results; 3. identify testable questions and recognize what is known and what is unknown in scientific investigations; 4. measure and describe properties of objects and substances and identify changes between the physical states of matter; 5. identify forces as pushes or pulls and describe motion; 6. identify the characteristics of sound, light, and electricity and common forms of energy and their uses; 7. identify plant and animal structures and functions and compare organisms based on common characteristics; 8. describe the roles of the digestive and skeletal systems; 9. describe patterns of change in position of the Sun and identify planets of the solar system; 10. describe precipitation, runoff, erosion, weathering, climate, and weather and give examples of each; 11. describe characteristics of rocks, identify major soil components; identify fossils; and give examples of how fossils illustrate the past; 12. identify living and nonliving components of an ecosystem and give examples of how humans affect the environment; and 13. identify examples of manufactured products and explain the differences between renewable and nonrenewable resources. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. recognize some testable questions and conduct steps of an investigation, given explicit directions; 2. identify tools or resources needed to make and describe observations and describe the results of an experiment; 3. recognize that some questions are testable and some are not; 4. describe properties of objects and substances and identify freezing, melting, and boiling; 5. identify forces as pushes or pulls; 6. identify characteristics of sound, light, or electricity and common forms of energy or their uses; 7. identify plant and animal structures and describe common characteristics of organisms; 8. identify organs in the digestive system and/ or components of the skeletal system; 9. identify simple patterns of change in day and night and shadows and identify examples of planets of the solar system; 10. recognize and identify examples of precipitation, runoff, and erosion and describe climate and weather or give examples of each; 11. identify differences in some rocks, recognize and describe soil; and define fossil and recognize one when it is presented; 12. identify basic components of an ecosystem and recognize how human activities affect the environment; and 13. identify examples of manufactured products and renewable and nonrenewable resources. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in science have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. recognize some testable questions and conduct steps of an investigation, given explicit directions; 2. identify tools or resources needed to make and describe observations and describe the results of an experiment; 3. recognize that some questions are testable and some are not; 4. describe properties of objects and substances and identify freezing, melting, and boiling; 5. identify forces as pushes and pulls; 6. identify characteristics of sound, light, or electricity and common forms of energy or their uses; 7. identify plant and animal structures and describe common characteristics of organisms; 8. identify organs in the digestive system and/ or components of the skeletal system; 9. identify simple patterns of change in day and night and shadows and identify examples of planets of the solar system; 10. recognize and identify examples of precipitation, runoff, and erosion and describe climate and weather or give examples of each; 11. identify differences in some rocks; recognize and describe soil; and define fossil and recognize one when it is presented; 12. identify basic components of an ecosystem and recognize how human activities affect the environment; and 13. identify examples of manufactured products and renewable and nonrenewable resources. D. Grade 3 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. analyze geographical data, physical characteristics, patterns of settlement, and the changing environment of Louisiana; 2. analyze spatial and cultural relationships between humans and the environment; 3. analyze charts, graphs, diagrams, and maps; 4. analyze governmental responsibilities at various levels, including EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 40 state government; 5. analyze the differences between rules and laws, citizen involvement in government, and the qualities of a good citizen; 6. analyze fundamental economic concepts; 7. compare various components of the economy, including the local and regional trade of goods and services produced in Louisiana; 8. differentiate among types of historical sources; 9. describe and analyze information presented in various graphic forms; 10. describe family life and analyze changes within society; and 11. describe and analyze historical figures, symbols, and events in Louisiana history. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. organize and interpret geographical data about Louisiana; 2. explain the physical characteristics, patterns of settlement, and changing environment of Louisiana; 3. compare spatial and cultural relationships between humans and the environment; 4. evaluate charts, graphs, diagrams, and maps; 5. describe governmental responsibilities at various levels, including state government; 6. describe the differences between rules and laws, citizen involvement in government, and the qualities of a good citizen; 7. describe fundamental economic concepts; 8. explain various components of the economy, including the local and regional trade of goods and services produced in Louisiana; 9. categorize various types of historical sources and interpret information presented in various graphic forms; 10. explain family life and how it changes; and 11. describe historical figures, symbols, and events in Louisiana history. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use geographical data to explain events related to Louisiana; 2. describe the physical characteristics, patterns of settlement, and changing environment of Louisiana; 3. describe spatial and cultural relationships between humans and the environment; 4. describe how charts, graphs, diagrams, and maps are used; 5. identify governmental responsibilities at various levels, including state government; 6. identify differences between rules and laws, citizen involvement in government, and the qualities of a good citizen; 7. identify some fundamental economic concepts and terms and recognize and describe various components of the economy, including the local and regional trade of goods and services produced in Louisiana; 8. identify types of historical sources and recognize information presented in various graphic forms; 9. describe family life and how it changes; and 10. identify the importance of historical figures, symbols, and events in Louisiana history. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify geographical data related to events in Louisiana; 2. recognize the physical characteristics, patterns of settlement, and changing environment of Louisiana; 3. recognize spatial relationships between humans and the environment; 4. identify features of charts, graphs, diagrams, and maps; 5. recognize governmental responsibilities at various levels, including state government; 6. identify differences between rules and laws, citizen involvement in government, and the qualities of a good citizen; 7. identify some fundamental economic concepts and terms and recognize components of the economy, including the local and regional trade of goods and services produced in Louisiana; 8. recognize that there are several types of historical sources and that historical information may be presented in various graphic forms; 9. recognize family life and how it changes; and 10. identify historical figures, symbols, and events in Louisiana history. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in social studies have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. identify geographical data related to events in Louisiana; 2. identify features of charts, graphs, diagrams, and maps; 3. recognize the physical characteristics, patterns of settlement, and changing environment of Louisiana; 4. recognize spatial relationships between humans and the environment; 5. recognize governmental responsibilities at various levels, including state government; 6. identify differences between rules and laws, citizen involvement in government, and the qualities of a good citizen; 7. identify some fundamental economic concepts and terms and recognize various components of the economy, including the local and regional trade of goods and services produced in Louisiana; 8. recognize that there are several types of historical sources and that historical information may be presented in various graphic forms; 9. recognize family life and how it changes; and 10. identify historical figures, symbols, and events in Louisiana history. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 991 ( June 2007), amended LR 39: 1425 ( June 2013). § 1713. Grade 5 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 5 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. determine meanings of a wide variety of words using a range of strategies; 2. demonstrate a thorough understanding of what they read by making connections between ideas and information in a variety of texts; 3. interpret meanings of various story elements, such as tone, and literary devices; 4. research topics by integrating information from multiple print and electronic resources; 5. identify accurate documentation of sources following a model; 6. construct responses with sharply focused central ideas; logical organization; thorough elaboration; ample, well- chosen evidence from texts; and effective transitional words and phrases; 7. demonstrate thorough understanding of the writing task through the use of effective vocabulary and complex sentence structures that enhance meaning and create compelling voice; and 8. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify word meanings using a variety of strategies; 2. demonstrate an understanding of what they read by using a variety of reasoning skills, including identifying implied main ideas, making inferences, and drawing conclusions; 3. interpret the meaning of various story elements and literary devices, such as imagery; 4. research topics by selecting appropriate information from multiple print and electronic resources; 5. identify all parts of bibliographic entries following a model; 6. construct responses with clear central ideas, logical organizational patterns, sufficient elaboration, appropriate evidence from texts, and transitions that unify; 7. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of interesting vocabulary and a variety of sentence structures that clarify meaning and create clear voice; and Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 41 dministrative Code April 2015 8. demonstrate reasonable command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of grade- level words using various strategies; 2. demonstrate a general understanding of what they read by using reasoning skills, including identifying stated main ideas, making simple inferences, and drawing simple conclusions; 3. identify story elements and literary devices, such as foreshadowing; 4. research topics by locating appropriate information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 5. give credit for borrowed information following a model; 6. construct responses with central ideas, observable organizational patterns, some elaboration and evidence from texts, and simple transitions; 7. demonstrate awareness of the writing task through the use of appropriate vocabulary and sentence variety that create voice; and 8. demonstrate some control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of commonly used words; 2. demonstrate a partial understanding of what they read by identifying simple cause/ effect relationships and paraphrasing information; 3. identify some literary devices and literary elements, such as characterization and simpler themes; 4. research topics by locating some information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 5. identify some parts of a bibliographic entry following a model; 6. construct responses with weak central ideas, weak organization, little elaboration and evidence from texts, and few transitions; 7. demonstrate limited understanding of the writing task through the use of simple and/ or inappropriate vocabulary, basic sentence structures, and weak voice; and 8. demonstrate little control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English Language Arts have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. locate appropriate information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 3. construct responses with focused central ideas, observable organization, sufficient supporting details and appropriate evidence from texts, and transitions; 4. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of appropriate vocabulary and varied sentence structures that create voice; and 5. demonstrate acceptable control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. B. Grade 5 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. effectively communicate an understanding of fractions, and use them to perform arithmetic in word problems; 2. solve complex multi- step and real- life problems by analyzing, evaluating, and employing the most efficient strategies and appropriate procedures; 3. find, graph, and discuss the solutions to one- step inequalities; 4. use models and drawings to describe and interpret basic two- dimensional geometric shapes; and 5. draw conclusions from data represented in various forms. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. conceptually understand, discuss, and use positive fractions to compare values, determine equivalence, and perform simple arithmetic; 2. identify and apply multiple strategies, including estimation and mental math, to solve multi- step and real- life problems using whole numbers; 3. find and graph the solutions to one- step inequalities; 4. choose appropriate strategies to determine elapsed time, angle measures, and convert between units of measurement; 5. classify and describe the properties of basic two- dimensional geometric shapes; 6. identify and plot points on a coordinate grid; and 7. organize and display data using a variety of tables and graphs. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. recognize and compare common and equivalent fractions; 2. determine operations necessary to solve multi- step problems and real- life problems using whole numbers; 3. use estimation strategies and mental math to determine reasonable values and solutions; 4. find and graph solutions to one- step inequalities involving only whole numbers; 5. choose appropriate strategies to determine elapsed time and angle measures; 6. identify basic two- dimensional geometric shapes and their characteristics; 7. identify points on a coordinate grid; and 8. organize and display data using simple tables and graphs. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. recognize and compare common fractions; 2. solve whole number problems; 3. identify positive solutions to inequalities on a number line; 4. recognize and classify common two- dimensional shapes; 5. identify points in the first quadrant of a coordinate grid; and 6. read tables and graphs. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in Mathematics have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. recognize and compare common fractions; 2. solve whole number problems; 3. graph inequalities on a number line; 4. recognize and classify common two- dimensional shapes; 5. identify points in the first quadrant of a coordinate grid; and 6. read tables and graphs. C. Grade 5 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare and contrast investigations by generating testable questions, identifying variables, and describing experimental designs; 2. select appropriate tools and resources for data collection; analyze data; identify patterns; make inferences; and predict trends; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses in a variety of appropriate methods; 4. explain how science is advanced through mathematics, technology, communication, and the work of others; 5. compare/ describe properties and phases of matter, the formation of substances, the structure of atoms, and types and sources of energy; 6. compare motion and predict future positions of objects and explain how changes in a light source and an object alter shadows; 7. describe the structural organization of organisms; classify common organisms; and relate cell components to their functions; 8. compare adaptations, metamorphosis, photosynthesis, and respiration in organisms and describe different types of disease transmission; 9. explain why it takes different amounts of time for natural events to EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 42 occur and compare objects in the solar system; 10. compare the atmosphere, hydrosphere, climate, and weather and explain the water cycle; 11. distinguish between common soils, rocks, and minerals and the processes that prevent or cause erosion; 12. describe different naturally occurring cycles and how changes affect organisms and compare communities within ecosystems; and 13. identify and describe the impact of human activities and common pollutants on local and global ecosystems. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. explain investigations by generating testable questions and identifying variables; 2. select tools and resources for data collection; analyze data; identify patterns; and make inferences; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses; 4. describe how science is advanced through mathematics, technology, communication, and the work of others; 5. identify/ describe properties and phases of matter, the formation of substances, the structure of atoms, and types and sources of energy; 6. compare, calculate, and graph motion and describe how changes in a light source and an object alter shadows; 7. describe the structural organization of organisms, classify common organisms, and describe cell components and their functions; 8. describe adaptations, metamorphosis, photosynthesis, and respiration in organisms and identify different types of disease transmission; 9. estimate the range of time in which natural events occur and describe the characteristics and movements of objects in the solar system; 10. describe the atmosphere, hydrosphere, climate, weather, and the water cycle; 11. identify rocks, minerals, and components of common soils and the processes that affect erosion; 12. describe different naturally occurring cycles and where they are found in ecosystems and compare communities within ecosystems; and 13. identify and describe the impact of human activities on local ecosystems and identify common pollutants found in water, air, and soil. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. describe an investigation and identify its variables; 2. select tools and resources correctly to collect data; analyze data; and recognize patterns; 3. communicate experimental data and analyses; 4. know and describe how science is continually tested and advanced and that it begins with a review of the work of others; 5. identify/ describe properties and phases of matter, the formation of substances, the parts of atoms, and types and sources of energy; 6. calculate and graph motion and identify how changes in a light source and an object alter shadows; 7. identify organizational levels of living things, classify common organisms, and describe cell components and their functions; 8. identify stages of metamorphosis of amphibians, photosynthesis, respiration in plants, and that diseases are transmitted in different ways; 9. identify short- and long- term natural events and identify objects in the solar systems based on their characteristics and movements; 10. identify components of the atmosphere and hydrosphere, examples of climate and weather patterns, and processes of the water cycle; 11. identify common rocks and minerals and components of various soils and recognize processes that affect erosion; 12. identify or describe different naturally occurring cycles, the needs of an organism, and organisms in different ecosystems; and 13. identify and describe the impact of human activities on parts of an ecosystem and identify examples of water and air pollution. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. describe an investigation; 2. recognize tools and resources to collect data and know that patterns in data are affected by natural events; 3. communicate experimental data and recognize statements that are not supported by evidence; 4. describe that science is continually advancing and know that investigations generally include the work of others; 5. identify properties and phases of matter, the formation of new substances, protons and electrons, and types of energy; 6. calculate or graph motion and know that changes in a light source and an object alter the size and shape of shadows; 7. recognize the structural organization of living things; use a simple dichotomous key; and describe cell components; 8. recognize that metamorphosis occurs in amphibians; identify photosynthesis or respiration; and recognize that diseases are transmitted; 9. identify objects in the solar system based on their characteristics and movements; 10. identify the atmosphere and hydrosphere, examples of climate and weather patterns, and processes of the water cycle; 11. identify common rocks and minerals; recognize that soil is comprised of different things; and 12. recognize a process that affects erosion; 13. identify different naturally occurring cycles; recognize the characteristics of an organism; and compare organisms in ecosystems; and 14. identify human activities that impact the environment and list examples of various kinds of water and pollution. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in science have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. describe an investigation; 2. recognize tools and resources to collect data and know that patterns in data are affected by natural events; 3. communicate experimental data and recognize statements that are not supported by evidence; 4. describe that science is continually advancing and know that investigations generally include the work of others; 5. identify properties and phases of matter, the formation of new substances, protons and electrons, and types of energy; 6. calculate or graph motion and know that changes in a light source and an object alter the size and shape of shadows; 7. recognize the structural organization of living things; use a simple dichotomous key; and describe cell components; 8. recognize that metamorphosis occurs in amphibians; identify photosynthesis or respiration; and recognize that diseases are transmitted; 9. identify objects in the solar system based on their characteristics and movements; 10. identify the atmosphere and hydrosphere, examples of climate and weather patterns, and processes of the water cycle; 11. identify common rocks and minerals; recognize that soil is comprised of different things; and recognize a process that affects erosion; 12. identify different naturally occurring cycles; recognize the characteristics of an organism; and compare organisms in ecosystems; and 13. identify human activities that impact the environment and list examples of various kinds of water and pollution. D. Grade 5 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. analyze, describe, interpret, and use geographical data and tools to explain early American history; 2. analyze the physical structure and natural resources of the United States in terms of regions; 3. locate major landforms and geographic features on a map of the United States; 4. describe and analyze the governmental, economic, and social forces that contribute to migration; 5. describe and compare the impact of the natural environment on human activity; 6. analyze economic activities of American Indian cultures; 7. analyze the economic interdependence of the thirteen original colonies and how economic concepts motivated early explorations; 8. interpret information from varied historical sources and analyze issues and viewpoints presented in graphic or narrative form; 9. analyze the impact of European and African settlements in the Americas through the colonial era and explain how cultures change; 10. analyze the political, social, and economic organization and Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 43 dministrative Code April 2015 structure of the thirteen original colonies that became the United States; and 11. describe and differentiate among ancient American empires. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. interpret and use information from geographical data and tools to explain early American history; 2. explain the impact of the physical structure and natural resources of the United States in terms of regions; 3. locate major landforms and geographic features on a map of the United States; 4. explain the governmental, economic, and social forces that contribute to migration; 5. explain the impact of the natural environment on human activity; 6. describe economic activities of American Indian cultures; 7. describe the economic interdependence of the thirteen original colonies and how economic concepts motivated early explorations; 8. describe varied historical sources and issues and viewpoints presented in graphic or narrative form; 9. describe the impact of Europeans and African settlements in the Americas through the colonial era and explain how cultures change; 10. describe the political, social, and economic organization and structure of the thirteen original colonies that became the United States; and 11. describe ancient American empires. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use geographical data and tools to explain early American history; 2. describe the physical structure and natural resources of the United States in terms of regions; 3. locate major landforms and geographic features on a map of the United States; 4. describe the governmental, economic, and social forces that contribute to migration; 5. describe the impact of the natural environment on human activity; 6. identify examples of economic activities of American Indian cultures; 7. identify the economic interdependence of the thirteen original colonies and how economic concepts motivated early explorations; 8. identify varied historical sources and issues and viewpoints presented in graphic or narrative form; 9. identify European and African settlements in the Americas through the colonial era and explain how cultures change; 10. identify the political, social, and economic organization and structure of the thirteen original colonies that became the United States; and 11. identify various aspects of ancient American empires. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify geographical data and tools relating to early American history: 2. recognize the physical structure and natural resources of the United States in terms of regions; 3. locate major landforms and geographic features on a map of the United States; 4. identify governmental economic and social forces that contribute to migration; 5. recognize the impact of the natural environment on human activity; 6. recognize the economic activities of American Indian cultures; 7. recognize the economic interdependence of the thirteen original colonies and the economic motivations for early explorations; 8. recognize types of historical sources and issues and viewpoints presented in graphic or narrative form; 9. recognize some European and African settlements in the Americas through the colonial era and explain how cultures change; 10. recognize examples of the political, social, and economic organization and structure of the thirteen original colonies; and 11. recognize ancient American empires. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in social studies have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. identify geographical data and tools relating to early American history; 2. recognize the physical structure and natural resources of the United States in terms of regions; 3. locate major landforms and geographic features on a map of the United States; 4. identify governmental, economic, and social forces that contribute to migration; 5. recognize the impact of the natural environment on human activity; 6. recognize the economic activities of American Indian cultures; 7. recognize the economic interdependence of the thirteen original colonies and the economic motivations for the early explorations; 8. recognize types of historical sources and issues and viewpoints presented in graphic or narrative form; 9. recognize some European and African settlements in the Americas through the colonial era and explain how cultures change; 10. recognize examples of the political, social, and economic organization and structure of the thirteen original colonies; and 11. recognize ancient American empires. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 994 ( June 2007), amended LR 39: 1427 ( June 2013). § 1715. Grade 6 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 6 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. determine meanings of a wide variety of words using a range of strategies; 2. demonstrate a thorough understanding of what they read by using a variety of complex strategies, including inductive reasoning and identifying implied main ideas and supporting details; 3. analyze complex story elements and literary devices and interpret an author's purpose for writing; 4. research topics by locating and integrating appropriate information from print and electronic resources; 5. accurately credit cited information in a bibliographic entry following a model; 6. construct responses with sharply focused central ideas; coherent and logical organization; thorough elaboration; ample, well- chosen evidence from texts; and a variety of effective transitions; 7. demonstrate thorough understanding of the writing task through the use of vivid words, effective language techniques, and complex sentence structure that enhance meaning and create compelling voice; and 8. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. determine meanings of a wide variety of words using a range of strategies; 2. demonstrate a thorough understanding of what they read by using a variety of complex strategies, including inductive reasoning and identifying implied main ideas and supporting details; 3. analyze complex story elements and literary devices and interpret an author's purpose for writing; 4. research topics by locating and integrating appropriate information from print and electronic resources; 5. accurately credit cited information in a bibliographic entry following a model; 6. construct responses with sharply focused central ideas; coherent and logical organization; thorough elaboration; ample, well- chosen evidence from texts; and a variety of effective transitions; 7. demonstrate thorough understanding of the writing task through the use of vivid words, effective language techniques, and complex sentence structure that enhance meaning and create compelling voice; and 8. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 44 Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify word meanings using a variety of strategies; 2. demonstrate an understanding of what they read by using a variety of strategies, including making inferences, drawing conclusions, determining main ideas, comparing and contrasting, and predicting; 3. interpret story elements and literary devices and identify an author’s implied purpose for writing; 4. research topics by locating and selecting appropriate information from print and electronic resources; 5. identify all parts of a bibliographic entry following a model; 6. construct responses with clearly stated central ideas, logical organization with a progression of ideas, sufficient elaboration, relevant evidence from texts, and transitions that unify; 7. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of interesting vocabulary, appropriate language techniques, and varied sentence structures that create clear voice; and 8. demonstrate reasonable command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of grade- level words using a variety of strategies, including context clues; 2. demonstrate a general understanding of what they read by using basic strategies and simple reasoning skills, including identifying stated main ideas and supporting details; 3. identify story elements; literary devices, including imagery; and an author’s stated purpose for writing; 4. research topics by locating information in a variety of commonly used print and electronic reference resources such as newspapers, magazines, brochures, maps, and legends; 5. identify some parts of different kinds of bibliographic entries following a model; 6. construct responses with central ideas, observable organization, some supporting details and evidence from texts, and simple transitions; 7. demonstrate awareness of the writing task through the use of appropriate wording and some sentence variety that creates voice; and 8. demonstrate some control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of commonly used words; 2. demonstrate partial understanding of what they read by identifying literal information and drawing simple conclusions; 3. identify simple story elements and basic literary devices; 4. research topics by locating information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 5. identify some parts of a bibliographic entry for commonly used print and electronic resources; 6. construct responses with unclear central ideas, incomplete organizational patterns, little elaboration, and evidence from texts, and few transitions; 7. demonstrate limited understanding of the writing task through the use of generic vocabulary, little variety in sentence structure, and weak voice; and 8. demonstrate little control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English Language Arts have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. locate appropriate information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 3. construct responses with focused central ideas, observable organization, sufficient supporting details, relevant evidence from texts, and logical transitions; 4. demonstrate understanding of the writing task through the use of appropriate vocabulary and varied sentence structures that create voice; and 5. demonstrate acceptable control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. B. Grade 6 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare and solve problems involving multiple forms of numbers: fraction, decimal, percent, ratio, and proportions; 2. translate complex verbal phrases into algebraic expressions and vice versa, and evaluate complex expressions; 3. explain procedures involved in solving multi- step problems; 4. apply concepts, properties, and relationships of basic two- dimensional figures in real- life situations; 5. describe polyhedral using their basic properties; 6. use appropriate statistical measures and patterns in data to describe trends, extend patterns, and make predictions in real- life problems; and 7. use basic number and number theory concepts to determine and describe the relationship between numbers in problem settings. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use models to compare, explain, or solve problems involving fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, and proportions; 2. translate verbal phrases into algebraic expressions, and evaluate using substitution; 3. solve two - step equations with positive integer solutions; 4. apply concepts and properties of basic two- dimensional figures in real- life situations; 5. use and illustrate basic concepts of data analysis including frequency tables, stem- and- leaf plots, scatter plots, mean, median, mode, and range; and 6. construct, extend, and describe patterns of change in input/ output tables. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions and decimals; 2. use models to solve simple problems involving percents, ratios, and proportions; 3. translate common verbal phrases into algebraic expressions and use substitution to evaluate simple algebraic expressions; 4. solve two- step equations involving only integers; 5. find the perimeter and area of simple geometric figures graphed on a coordinate grid; 6. name and describe basic two- dimensional geometric shapes; 7. recognize basic concepts of data analysis including frequency tables, stem- and- leaf plots, scatter plots, mean, median, mode, and range; and 8. extend or describe patterns of change in input/ output tables. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use models to solve fraction, decimal, and percent problems, and recognize and identify ratios and percents from a model; 2. solve one- step equations; 3. recognize and name basic geometric shapes; Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 45 dministrative Code April 2015 4. recognize common units of length and area; 5. interpret data from a graph; and 6. complete a simple input/ output table. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in Mathematics have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. use models to solve fraction, decimal, and percent problems, and recognize and identify ratios and percents from a model; 2. solve one- step equations; 3. recognize and name basic geometric shapes; 4. recognize common units of length and area; 5. interpret data from a graph; and 6. complete a simple input/ output table. C. Grade 6 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare and contrast investigations by generating testable questions, identifying variables, and evaluating experimental designs; 2. select a variety of appropriate tools and resources for data collection; analyze data; make inferences; and predict trends; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses in a variety of appropriate methods; 4. describe and explain how science is advanced through mathematics, technology, communication, and the work of others; Advanced 5. identify faulty reasoning, information, communications, or statements that misinterpret or are not supported by evidence; 6. determine mass, volume, and density and recognize that density does not change with the amount of a substance; 7. identify the average atomic masses of given elements, using the periodic table; 8. compare physical and chemical properties and changes and relate the structure and movement of matter to temperature; 9. identify, describe, and compare substances in common materials and chemical reaction and predict the mass of their products; 10. analyze graphs of motion; infer how motion is related to applied forces; and predict future positions and speed of objects; 11. describe, compare, and give examples of different forms of energy, energy changes and interactions, and production and use risks; 12. categorize energy types and evaluate the risks and benefits of their use and production on the environment and economy; and 13. explain how people can conserve and sustain resources and evaluate both the short- and long- term effects of these actions. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. explain investigations by generating testable questions, identifying variables, and comparing experimental designs; 2. select appropriate tools and resources for data collection and analyze data to make inferences and predict trends; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses through appropriate methods; 4. describe how science is improved through mathematics, technology, communication, testing, and the work of others; 5. identify faulty reasoning and statements that misinterpret or are not supported by evidence; 6. determine the mass, volume, and density of different amounts of a variety of substances; 7. identify the average atomic masses of given elements, using the periodic table; 8. compare physical and chemical changes and differentiate between physical and chemical properties of a substance; 9. identify and describe substances in materials and chemical reactions and relate phase changes of water to changes in water temperature; 10. compare motion and predict future positions and speed of objects and describe forces acting on objects and predict their effects; 11. describe and give examples of different energy forms, energy changes and interactions, and energy production and use risks; 12. identify and categorize energy types and determine their uses and effects on the environment and economy; and 13. identify, describe, and categorize ways people can conserve and sustain resources. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. describe investigations by generating testable questions and identifying variables; 2. select appropriate tools and resources to collect and analyze data to evaluate explanations and models and to make inferences; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses; 4. recognize that science is improved by mathematics, technology, and the work of others and is continually tested, revised, and advanced; 5. identify faulty reasoning and statements that misinterpret or are not supported by evidence; 6. determine mass and volume and compare the masses of the same volumes of different substances; 7. identify the average atomic masses of given elements, using the periodic table; 8. identify physical and chemical properties and changes and describe the temperatures at which changes of the phase of water occurs; 9. identify substances in common materials and chemical reactions; 10. compare and construct graphs of motion and identify and describe forces acting on objects; 11. describe different forms of energy, transformations, and interactions with matter and identify risks associated with energy use; and 12. identify and categorize energy types and identify and describe ways people can conserve and sustain resources. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. describe an investigation and identify its variables; 2. select tools and resources to collect and use data to evaluate explanations and models; 3. communicate experimental data and explanations; 4. describe that science is continually tested, advanced, and improved by the work of others; 5. recognize statements that are not supported by evidence; 6. determine the masses and volumes of different substances and identify the atomic masses of given elements, using the periodic table; 7. identify physical and chemical properties or changes and identify substances in common materials; 8. recognize that phase changes of water occur at different temperatures; 9. identify and compare graphs of motion and identify forces acting on objects; 10. give examples of different energy forms, transformations, and interactions with matter and risks associated with energy use; and 11. identify categories of energy types and examples of how people can reuse, recycle, and reduce resources. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in science have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. describe an investigation and identify its variables; 2. select tools and resources to collect and use data to evaluate explanations and models; 3. communicate experimental data and explanations; 4. describe that science is continually tested, advanced, and improved by the work of others; 5. recognize statements that are not supported by evidence; 6. determine the masses and volumes of different substances and identify the atomic masses of given elements, using the periodic table; 7. identify physical and chemical properties or changes and identify substances in common materials; 8. recognize that phase changes of water occur at different temperatures; 9 identify and compare graphs of motion and identify forces acting on objects; 10. give examples of different energy forms, transformations, and interactions with matter and risks associated with energy use; and 11. identify categories of energy types and examples of how people can reuse, recycle, and reduce resources. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 46 D. Grade 6 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. apply geographical data and tools, including latitude and longitude, to real- world scenarios; 2. analyze how the world's physical environment affected human settlement and how political boundaries were established and maintained; 3. analyze the cultural impact of migration on world history; 4. analyze the impact of the natural environment on humans in ancient societies; 5. explain how aspects of Greek and Roman governments have influenced the U. S. government; 6. analyze historical examples of fundamental economic concepts and how they motivated human interaction; 7. analyze information on timelines and synthesize information taken from multiple historical source documents; 8. analyze causes and effects, characteristics, and motivations of historical events as presented in narrative form; 9. analyze the origins, spread, and effects of major world religions and their empires on European, Asian, and African civilizations; and 10. analyze human continuity and change from the time of river valley civilizations through the early Middle Ages. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. manipulate geographical data and tools, including latitude and longitude, to explain real- world scenarios; 2. explain how the world's physical environment affected human settlement and how political boundaries were established and maintained; 3. explain the cultural impact of migration on world history; 4. explain the impact of the natural environment on humans in ancient societies; 5. describe aspects of Greek and Roman governments that influenced the U. S. government; 6. explain historical examples of fundamental economic concepts and how they motivated human interaction; 7. evaluate and manipulate timelines and interpret the differences among multiple historical source documents; 8. interpret causes and effects, characteristics, and motivations of historical events as presented in narrative form; 9. interpret the origins, spread, and effects of major world religions and their empires on European, Asian, and African civilizations; and 10. interpret human continuity and change from the time of river valley civilizations through the early Middle Ages. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use geographical data and tools, including latitude and longitude, to describe real- world scenarios; 2. describe how the world's physical environment affected human settlement and how political boundaries were established and maintained; 3. describe the cultural impact of migration on world history; 4. describe the impact of the natural environment on humans in ancient societies; 5. identify aspects of Greek and Roman governments that influenced the U. S. government; 6. describe historical examples of fundamental economic concepts and how they motivated human interaction; 7. relate information on timelines to historical events and describe information available from multiple historical source documents; 8. describe causes and effects, characteristics, and motivations of historical events as presented in narrative form; 9. describe the origins, spread, and effects of major world religions and their empires on Europeans, Asian, and African civilizations; and 10. describe human continuity and change from the time of river valley civilizations through the early Middle Ages. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify geographical data and tools, including latitude and longitude, used to identify real- world scenarios; 2. recognize how the world's physical environment affected human settlement and how political boundaries were established and maintained; 3. identify the cultural impact of migration on world history; 4. recognize the impact of the natural environment on humans in ancient societies; 5. recognize some aspects of Greek and Roman governments that influenced the U. S. government; 6. recognize historic examples of fundamental economic concepts and how they motivated human interaction; 7. identify historical timelines and multiple historical source documents; 8. identify causes and effects, characteristics, and motivations of historical events as presented in narrative form; 9. identify the origins, spread, and effects of major world religions and their empires on European, Asian, and African civilizations; and 10. identify human continuity and change from the time of river valley civilizations through the early Middle Ages. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in social studies have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. identify geographical data and tools, including latitude and longitude, used to identify real- world scenarios; 2. recognize how the world's physical environment affected human settlement and how political boundaries were established and maintained; 3. identify the cultural impact of migration on world history; 4. recognize the impact of the natural environment on humans in ancient societies; 5. recognize some aspects of Greek and Roman governments that influenced the U. S. government; 6. recognize historic examples of fundamental economic concepts and how they motivated human interaction; 7. identify historical timelines and multiple historical source documents; 8. identify causes and effects, characteristics, and motivations of historical events in narrative form; 9. identify the origins, spread, and effects of major world religions and their empires on European, Asian, and African civilizations; and 10. identify human continuity and change from the time of river valley civilizations through the early Middle Ages. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 999 ( June 2007), amended LR 39: 1428 ( June 2013). § 1717. Grade 7 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 7 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 47 dministrative Code April 2015 Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. determine meanings of words using a variety of strategies, including knowledge of base words and roots; 2. demonstrate a thorough understanding of what they read using a variety of complex strategies, including inductive reasoning, identifying implied main ideas and supporting details, and comparing and contrasting literary elements; 3. analyze and interpret complex story elements, literary devices, elements of various genres, and author's purpose; 4. research topics by evaluating and integrating information from multiple print and electronic resources; 5. accurately credit cited information in a bibliographic entry following a model; 6. construct responses with sharply focused central ideas; strategic organization; thorough elaboration with ample, well- chosen evidence from texts; and effective transitions; 7. demonstrate thorough understanding of the writing task by using effective vocabulary and language techniques and varied sentence structures that enhance meaning and create engaging voice; and 8. demonstrate consistent command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify word meanings using a variety of strategies; 2. demonstrate an understanding of what they read by using a variety of reasoning skills, including deductive reasoning; 3. identify complex story elements, literary devices, distinctive characteristics of various genres, and the effect of an author's bias or perspective; 4. research topics by locating and selecting useful information from multiple print and electronic resources; 5. identify all parts of different bibliographic entries following a model; 6. construct responses with clear central ideas, coherent organization, sufficient elaboration, relevant evidence from texts, and transitions that unify; 7. demonstrate understanding of the writing task by using interesting vocabulary, appropriate language techniques, and a variety of sentence structures that create clear voice; and 8. demonstrate reasonable command of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of grade- level words using a variety of strategies; 2. demonstrate a general understanding of what they read by identifying cause- effect relationships, sequencing events, and predicting the outcome of a story or situation; 3. identify story elements, including character motivation and plot sequence; some literary devices; elements of various genres, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; and author’s purpose; 4. research topics by locating appropriate information in commonly used print and electronic reference resources; 5. identify parts of a bibliographic entry for commonly used sources following a model; 6. construct responses with central ideas, observable organization, necessary details and evidence from texts, and simple transitions; 7. demonstrate awareness of the writing task by using some appropriate vocabulary and sentence variety that create voice; and 8. demonstrate some control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of commonly used words using a variety of strategies, including context clues; 2. demonstrate some understanding of what they read in grade- appropriate texts by using simple strategies such as making simple inferences and drawing simple conclusions; 3. identify basic story elements; some elements of various genres, including fiction, nonfiction, or poetry; and some literary devices; 4. research topics by locating information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 5. identify some parts of a bibliographic entry following a model; 6. construct responses with vague central ideas, weak organizational patterns, and minimal supporting details and evidence from texts; 7. demonstrate a limited awareness of the writing task by using repetitive or generic vocabulary, little or no sentence variety, and weak voice; and 8. demonstrate little control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English Language Arts have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. select appropriate information in commonly used print and electronic resources; 3. construct responses with focused central ideas, observable organization, sufficient supporting details and relevant evidence from texts; 4. demonstrate understanding of writing task by using appropriate vocabulary and varied sentence structure that create voice; and 5. demonstrate acceptable control of spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. B. Grade 7 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. apply correct order of operations, and solve multi- step real- life problems; 2. evaluate complex algebraic expressions containing exponents and square roots of perfect squares; 3. apply proportional reasoning to solve complex problems including applications and comparisons involving positive rational numbers; 4. solve multi- step equations and inequalities; 5. draw, find, and use lengths and angles of two- dimensional figures including circles to solve real- life problems; 6. calculate area and perimeter of composite geometric shapes, and locate the missing vertex of a shape on a coordinate grid; 7. discuss, determine, and compare theoretical and experimental probabilities; and 8. algebraically describe and create linear, multiplicative, and other patterns of change. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. recognize and apply order of operations and solve single- and multi- step problems including multiplying and dividing fractions and decimals; 2. evaluate algebraic expressions using substitution involving square roots and exponents; 3. use proportions involving whole numbers, rates, and ratios to solve real- life problems; 4. solve multi- step equations and inequalities involving non- negative rational numbers and negative integers; 5. identify, draw, and find lengths and angles of two- dimensional figures including circles; 6. calculate area and perimeter of simple composite geometric shapes and locate the missing vertex of a shape on a coordinate grid; 7. determine and compare theoretical and experimental probabilities; and 8. verbally and algebraically describe linear, multiplicative, and other patterns of change. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare using symbols, and compute equivalent fractions, decimals, and percents; 2. evaluate simple order of operation problems; 3. use proportions involving whole numbers, rates, and ratios to solve problems; 4. solve simple one- and two- step equations and inequalities; EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 48 5. calculate the circumference and area of circles; 6. draw and identify angles and measurements in simple polygons and circles; 7. compute simple probabilities and use basic mathematical terms associated with probability, such as event and favorable outcomes; and 8. verbally and algebraically describe linear patterns of change. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. recognize and compute equivalent fractions and decimals; 2. evaluate squares and square roots; 3. solve single- step problems involving positive rational numbers; 4. identify points in all four quadrants of a coordinate grid; 5. identify angles in simple polygons; 6. determine basic probabilities; and 7. verbally describe and extend linear patterns of change. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in Mathematics have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. recognize and compute equivalent fractions and decimals; 2. evaluate squares and square roots; 3. solve single- step problems involving positive rational numbers; 4. identify points in all four quadrants of a coordinate grid; 5. identify angles in simple polygons; 6. determine basic probabilities; and 7. verbally describe and extend linear patterns of change. C. Grade 7 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. analyze investigations by researching and evaluating testable questions, dependent and independent variables, and experimental designs; 2. select appropriate tools and resources for data collection and analyze data to evaluate explanations, make inferences, and predict trends; 3. communicate related research, experimental procedures, data, and analyses in a variety of appropriate methods; 4. explain how science is tested, revised, and advanced through problem solving, mathematics, technology, and communications; 5. compare functions of plant and animal cell structures ( i. e., organelles) and explain why the life cycles of plants and animals differ; 6. analyze how the cell processes of osmosis, diffusion, respiration, and photosynthesis are necessary for an organism's survival; 7. describe the growth and development of humans from infancy to old age and various factors affecting this development; 8. analyze how the failure of organs or systems affects health and how methods of transferring genetic information impact an organism; 9. analyze factors that affect relationships between organisms in ecosystems and describe how adaptation help species survive; 10. analyze the roles of components in ecosystems, the resources humans derive from ecosystems, and the impact of human activities; 11. compare, describe, or analyze ecosystems by using the movement of energy and the effects of limiting factors and carrying capacity; and 12. compare and contrast the nitrogen and carbon cycles and explain why they are important for the survival of organisms. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. compare investigations by identifying and evaluating testable questions, variables, and experimental designs; 2. select appropriate tools and resources for data collection and analyze data to evaluate explanations, make inferences, and predict trends; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses in a variety of appropriate methods; 4. describe how science is tested, revised, and advanced through problem solving, mathematics, technology, and communication; 5. describe functions of plant and animal cell structures ( i. e., organelles) and compare the life cycles of plants and animals; 6. compare the cell processes of osmosis and diffusion and respiration and photosynthesis; 7. classify organisms using a dichotomous key and describe the growth and development of humans from infancy to old age; 8. relate the functions of organs, systems, and overall health in sustaining life and describe methods of transferring genetic information; 9. describe and compare relationships between organisms in ecosystems and explain how adaptations help species survive; 10. compare the roles of components in ecosystems, the resources humans derive from ecosystems, and impact of human activities; 11. identify, describe, or explain ecosystems by using the movement of energy and the effects of limiting factors and carrying capacity; and 12. compare and contrast the nitrogen and carbon cycles and explain why they are important for the survival of organisms. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. describe investigations by comparing or recognizing testable questions, variables, and experimental designs; 2. select appropriate tools and resources for data collection and analyze data to develop explanations, make inferences, and predict trends; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses through appropriate methods; 4. describe how science is tested, revised, and advanced through problem solving, mathematics, technology, and communication; 5. differentiate between plants and animals by their cell structures ( i. e., organelles) and describe the life cycles of plants and animals; 6. describe the cell processes of osmosis, diffusion, respiration, and photosynthesis; 7. classify organisms using a dichotomous key and describe human growth and development; 8. describe the functions of organs and organ systems and identify methods of transferring genetic information; 9. describe relationships between organisms in ecosystems and how adaptations help species survive; 10. identify the roles of components in ecosystems, the resources humans derive from ecosystems, and the impact of human activities; 11. identify and describe ecosystems by using the movement of energy and the effects of limiting factors carrying capacity; and 12. describe and explain the nitrogen and carbon cycles. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in science generally exhibit the ability to: 1. describe an investigation by identifying testable questions and variables; 2. select tools and resources correctly to collect and analyze data to evaluate explanations and make inferences; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses; 4. describe how science is tested, revised, and advanced, and identify that mathematics and technology improve science; 5. identify functions of plant and animal cell structures ( i. e., organelles) and describe parts of the life cycles of plants and animals; 6. identify the cell processes of osmosis, diffusion, respiration, and photosynthesis; 7. classify organisms using a dichotomous key and know that different factors affect human growth or development over time; 8. identify functions of organs and identify the role of genetic information in an organism; 9. identify relationships between organisms in ecosystems and recognize adaptations; 10. identify the components of ecosystems as living or nonliving and know that humans' use of ecosystem resources can have impact; 11. identify the roles of organisms in a food chain and factors that limit the carrying capacity and restrict the growth of populations; and 12. identify parts of the nitrogen and carbon cycles. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in science have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. describe an investigation by identifying testable questions and Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 49 dministrative Code April 2015 variables; 2. select tools and resources correctly to collect and analyze data to evaluate explanations and make inferences; 3. communicate experimental procedures, data, and analyses; 4. describe how science is tested, revised, and advanced, and identify that mathematics and technology improve science; 5. identify functions of plant and animal cell structures ( i. e., organelles) and describe parts of the life cycles of plants and animals; 6. identify the cell processes of osmosis, diffusion, respiration, and photosynthesis; 7. classify organisms using a dichotomous key and know that different factors affect human growth or development over time; 8. identify functions of organs and identify the role of genetic information in an organism; 9. identify relationships between organisms in ecosystems and recognize adaptations; 10. identify the components of ecosystems as living or nonliving and know that humans' use of ecosystem resources can have impact; 11. identify the roles of organisms in a food chain and factors that limit the carrying capacity and restrict the growth of populations; and 12. identify parts of the nitrogen and carbon cycles. D. Grade 7 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. apply geographical data and tools and analyze the impact of the United States' physical structure on historical events; 2. analyze cultural aspects of the development of the United States and the effects of natural resources on regional differences; 3. analyze the structure and purposes of government in the world and in the United States; 4. analyze how ancient governments influenced American democracy and culture; 5. analyze the U. S. political system from 1781 to 1860 and factors contributing to conflict and cooperation among nations; 6. analyze the nature of U. S. citizen rights and responsibilities in society; 7. analyze ideas found in the Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence; 8. analyze Mercantilism's role in colonization and conflict and U. S. economic activity contributing to international interdependence; 9. interpret graphic and narrative sources of information; 10. analyze and interpret the contributions of significant figures and events in U. S. history from 1763 to 1860; and 11. analyze national continuity and change from the pre- Revolutionary Era through the beginning of the American Civil War. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. interpret and manipulate geographical data and tools and explain the impact of the United States' physical structure on historic events; 2. explain the cultural aspects of the development of the United States and the impact of natural resources on regional differences; 3. explain the structure and purposes of government in the world and in the United States; 4. explain how ancient governments influenced American democracy and culture; 5. explain changes in the American political system from 1781 to 1860 and factors contributing to conflict and cooperation among nations; 6. explain aspects of U. S. citizen rights and responsibilities in society; 7. explain ideas found in the Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence; 8. explain Mercantilism's role in colonization and conflict and how U. S. economic activity contributed to international interdependence; 9. interpret graphic and narrative sources of information; 10. explain the contributions of significant figures and events in U. S. history from 1763 to 1860; and 11. explain aspects of national continuity and change from the pre- Revolutionary Era through the beginning of the American Civil War. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use geographical data and tools to explain and describe the impact of the United States' physical structure on historical events; 2. describe cultural aspects of the development of the United States and the impact of natural resources on regional differences; 3. describe the structure and purposes of government in the world and in the United States; 4. explain how ancient governments influenced American democracy and culture; 5. describe changes in the U. S. political system from 1781 to 1860 and factors contributing to conflict and cooperation among nations; 6. describe aspects of U. S. citizen rights and responsibilities in society; 7. explain ideas found in the Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence; 8. describe Mercantilism's role in colonization and conflict and U. S. economic activity contributing to international interdependence; 9. explain graphic sources of information and describe the importance of information obtained from narrative sources of information; 10. describe contributions of significant figures and events in U. S. history from 1763 to 1860; and 11. describe national continuity and change from the pre- Revolutionary Era through the beginning of the American Civil War. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in social studies generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify geographical data and tools and describe the impact of the United States' physical structure on historical events; 2. recognize cultural aspects of the development of the United States and the impact of natural resources on regional differences; 3. identify the structure and purposes of government in the world and in the United States; 4. identify how ancient governments influenced American democracy and culture; 5. recognize elements of the U. S. political system from 1781 to 1860 and factors contributing to conflict and cooperation among nations; 6. describe aspects of U. S. citizen rights and responsibilities in society; 7. describe ideas found in the Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence; 8. define Mercantilism's role in colonization and conflict and U. S. economic activity contributing to international interdependence; 9. identify historical information in graphic form and identify various narrative sources of information; 10. identify significant personalities and events from 1763 to 1860; and 11. identify national continuity and change from the Early National Period through the beginning of the American Civil War. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in social studies have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. identify geographical data and tools and describe the impact of the United States' physical structure on historical events; 2. recognize cultural aspects of the development of the United States and the impact of natural resources on regional differences; 3. identify the structure and purposes of government in the world and in the United States; 4. identify how ancient governments influenced American democracy and culture; 5. recognize elements of the U. S. political system from 1781 to 1860 and factors contributing to conflict and cooperation among nations; 6. describe U. S. citizen rights and responsibilities in society; 7. describe ideas found in the Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence; 8. define Mercantilism's role in colonization and conflict and U. S. economic activity contributing to international interdependence; 9. identify historical information in graphic form and identify various narrative sources of information; 10. identify significant personalities and events from 1763 to 1860; EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 50 and 11. identify national continuity and change from the Early National Period through the beginning of the American Civil War. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 1002 ( June 2007), amended LR 39: 1429 ( June 2013). § 1719. Grade 9 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 9 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of a wide variety of general and technical words using a full range of strategies; 2. demonstrate literal and inferential understanding of what they read by making inferences, predictions, and generalizations; interpreting cause/ effect relationships; reasoning inductively and deductively; and making connections of ideas to real- life experiences; 3. analyze, including comparing and contrasting, complex story elements, literary devices, ideas, and an author's purpose and viewpoint; 4. research a topic by selecting and evaluating relevant information from a variety of print and electronic sources; 5. identify accurate parenthetical citations and bibliographic entries using a model; 6. use analytical, critical, and/ or creative thinking in response to a writing task; 7. construct a response with a clear central idea, logical and cohesive organization, thorough elaboration with a variety of supporting details; and a variety of varied, effective transitions; 8. demonstrate an awareness of audience through rich creative vocabulary and sentence structure that reflects voice or personality; and 9. maintain consistent command of sentence formation, usage, mechanics, and spelling. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of a variety of words using a variety of strategies; 2. demonstrate understanding of what they read using a variety of strategies, such as making inferences, predictions, and generalizations; drawing conclusions; determining cause/ effect relationships; and reasoning inductively and deductively; 3. interpret and compare/ contrast complex story elements, literary devices, ideas, and an author's purpose and viewpoint; 4. use knowledge of the distinctive characteristics of various genres to interpret elements; 5. research a topic by selecting and analyzing information from multiple print and electronic sources; 6. identify accurate parenthetical citations and bibliographic entries using a model; 7. use analytical, critical, and/ or creative thinking in response to a writing task; 8. construct a response with a central idea, logical organization, relevant elaboration, and varied, effective transitions; 9. demonstrate an awareness of audience through varied vocabulary and sentence structure; and 10. demonstrate reasonable command of sentence formation, usage, mechanics, and spelling. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of grade- level words using various strategies; 2. demonstrate understanding of what they read by identifying ideas and information from texts using various strategies such as sequencing; making simple inferences, predictions, and generalizations; drawing conclusions; and identify stated cause/ effect relationships; 3. identify and compare story elements, literary devices, main ideas, and an author's purpose and viewpoint; 4. identify the distinctive characteristics of various genres; 5. research a topic by selecting relevant information from a variety of print and electronic sources; 6. identify accurate bibliographic entries using a model; 7. demonstrate some evidence of critical and/ or creative thinking in response to a writing task; 8. construct a response with a central idea, some conscious organization, some supporting information, and simple transitions; 9. demonstrate audience awareness through some variety in vocabulary and sentence structure; and 10. demonstrate partial command of sentence formation, usage, mechanics, and spelling. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 51 dministrative Code April 2015 Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in English Language Arts generally exhibit the ability to: 1. identify meanings of commonly used words; 2. demonstrate partial understanding of what they read using strategies such as identifying simple sequences, drawing simple conclusions, making predictions and simple generalizations, and identifying stated cause/ effect relationships; 3. identify simple literary elements, devices, main ideas, and an author's stated purpose; 4. research a topic by locating and selecting some information from print and electronic sources; 5. identify accurate bibliographic entries for commonly used sources using a model; 6. demonstrate a limited response to a writing task; 7. construct a response with a weak central idea, some evidence of organization, minimal details, and few transitions; 8. demonstrate a limited awareness of audience through selection of simple or inappropriate vocabulary, and lack of sentence variety; and 9. demonstrate little or no command of sentence formation, usage, mechanics, and spelling. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English Language Arts have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of what they read; 2. identify simple story or literary elements, and elements of an author's style; 3. make simple or broad connections between texts and personal experiences; 4. locate information in commonly used sources; 5. develop an appropriate response to a writing task; 6. construct a response with a focused central idea, an observable organizational pattern, and sufficient supporting details; 7. show audience awareness through use of appropriate vocabulary, varied sentence structure, and personal style; and 8. demonstrate acceptable command of sentence formation usage, mechanics, and spelling. B. Grade 9 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Advanced Students scoring at the Advanced level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. evaluate, simplify, and solve problems involving scientific notations; 2. apply proportional reasoning to model and solve real- life problems involving direct and inverse variation; 3. use a variety of methods to solve problems involving 2 X 2 systems of linear equations; 4. graphically represent the solution of a 2 X 2 system of linear inequalities; 5. determine appropriate units and scales to use when solving measurement problems; 6. perform translations and line reflections in the coordinate plane; 7. translate fluently between tabular, graphical, and algebraic representations of functions; 8. compare, contrast, and describe characteristics of linear functions and basic families of functions; and 9. solve problems involving indirect measurement and express results in terms of the degrees of accuracy and precision. Mastery Students scoring at the Mastery level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. evaluate and simplify algebraic expressions involving order of operations with rational numbers; 2. apply proportional reasoning to model and solve real- life problems involving direct variation; 3. represent real- life situations as linear equations or inequalities and find solutions; 4. graphically represent 2 X 2 systems of equations and identify the solution; 5. make measurements based on the degree of precision or accuracy needed; 6. use points to describe translations and line reflections; 7. understand the relationship of the constants and coefficients in a linear function to the graph of the function; and 8. identify and describe the characteristics of families of linear functions. Basic Students scoring at the Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. represent numbers as exponential expressions with positive, integral exponents; 2. recognize and graph linear equations and use appropriate terminology to describe and interpret slope, intercept, point, intersection, etc.; 3. understand the language of algebra and make appropriate translations between verbal and symbolic representations; 4. choose appropriate common units ( U. S. and metric) to make measurements; 5. draw translations and line reflections in a coordinate system; 6. solve multi- step equations and inequalities in one variable; and 7. read, organize, construct, and interpret data presented in a variety of formats and make generalizations using these representations. Approaching Basic Students scoring at the Approaching Basic level in Mathematics generally exhibit the ability to: 1. perform basic operations with positive rational numbers; 2. locate points on a coordinate grid; 3. use calculators to evaluate polynomials for given values of the variables; 4. make measurements using common ( U. S. and metric) measurement units; and 5. follow and interpret processes expressed in flow charts. Unsatisfactory Students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in Mathematics have not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. perform basic operations with positive rational numbers; 2. locate points on a coordinate grid; 3. use calculators to evaluate polynomials for given values of the variables; 4. make measurements using common ( U. S. and metric) measurement units; and 5. follow and interpret processes expressed in flow charts. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 1006 ( June 2007). Subchapter E. iLEAP Assessment Structure § 1721. Content Standards A. The iLEAP tests are aligned to Louisiana content standards, benchmarks, and GLEs. They measure student's EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 52 knowledge of standards by grade spans through norm- referenced tests ( NRTs) and criterion- referenced tests ( CRTs). The test's format consists of: 1. Survey/ Core Battery: a. obtains information that can support instructional decisions made by teachers in the classroom; b. provides information to students and their parents for monitoring student growth from grade to grade; c. examines the yearly progress of grade groups as they pass through the school's curriculum; 2. GLEs/ Benchmarks: a. define the knowledge and skills students are expected to master by the end of each grade or high school course; 3. Standards: a. broad goals for what all students in Louisiana should know and be able to do at any grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 267 ( February 2007), repromulgated LR 33: 1007 ( June 2007). § 1723. English Language Arts Tests Structure A. The English Language Arts test includes NRT items from the Survey Battery of the ITBS for grades 3, 5, 6, and 7 and a CRT component. The tests are administered over two days. 1. The ( NRT) ITBS Survey Battery component and standards measured at grades 3, 5, 6, and 7 include the following. a. Reading: i. vocabulary; and ii. reading comprehension. b. Language: i. spelling; ii. capitalization; iii. punctuation; and iv. usage and expression. c. Louisiana English language arts standards measured by the NRT components include the following. i. Standard 1. Students read, comprehend, and respond to a range of materials, using a variety of strategies for different purposes. ii. Standard 6. Students read, analyze, and respond to literature as a record of life experiences. This standard is not tested at grade 3. iii. Standard 7. Students apply reasoning and problem- solving skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. iv. Standard 2. Students write competently for a variety of purposes and audiences. v. Standard 3. Students communicate using standard English grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and handwriting. 2. The ( CRT) Components and standards measured at grades 3, 5, 6, and 7 include the following: a. writing; and b. using information resources; c. Louisiana English language arts standards measured by the CRT components include the following: i. Standard 2. Students write competently for a variety of purposes and audiences; ii. Standard 5. Students locate, select, and synthesize information from a variety of texts, media, references, and technological sources to acquire and communicate knowledge. B. At grade 9, the English language arts test includes a NRT component from the Core Battery of the ITED and a CRT component. The tests are administered over two days. 1. The ( NRT) ITED Core Battery components and standards measured include the following: a. vocabulary; b. reading comprehension; and c. language: revising written materials. d. Louisiana English language arts standards measured include the following: i. Standard 1. Students read, comprehend, and respond to a range of materials, using a variety of strategies for different purposes; ii. Standard 2. Students write competently for a variety of purposes and audiences; iii. Standard 3. Students communicate using standard English grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and handwriting; iv. Standard 6. Students read, analyze, and respond to literature as a record of life experiences; and v. Standard 7. Students apply reasoning and problem- solving skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. 2. The Criterion- Referenced ( CRT) Components and standards measured include the following: a. writing; and b. using information resources; Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 53 dministrative Code April 2015 c. Louisiana English language arts standards measured by the CRT components include the following: i. Standard 2. Students write competently for a variety of purposes and audiences; ii. Standard 5. Students locate, select, and synthesize information from a variety of texts, media, references, and technological sources to acquire and communicate knowledge. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 267 ( February 2007), repromulgated LR 33: 1007 ( June 2007). § 1725. Math Tests Structure A. At grades 3, 5, 6, and 7 the Math tests include NRT items from the Survey Battery of the ITBS. The tests are administered over one day. 1. The NRT Component includes the following: a. multiple- choice items that assess Concepts and Estimation; and b. multiple- choice items that assess Problem Solving and Data Interpretation. 2. The CRT Component includes the following: a. multiple- choice items that assess Louisiana's standards, benchmarks, and GLEs. The items include NRT items that align to the Louisiana content standards and GLEs; b. constructed- response items that assess one or more strands, benchmarks, and/ or GLEs that require students to demonstrate the connection of the strand to the other strands and to real- life situations. B. At grade 9, the Math test includes NRT items from the Core Battery of the ITED with the exception of computation. The test is administered over one day. 1. The NRT Component includes the following: a. multiple- choice items that assess Math Concepts and Problem- Solving. 2. The CRT Component includes the following. a. Multiple- choice items that assess Louisiana standards, benchmarks, and GLEs. This part includes NRT items that align to the Louisiana content standards and GLEs. b. Constructed- response items that involve a number of separate steps and require application of multiple skills. The items are designed to assess one or more of the strands, benchmarks, and/ or GLEs that require students to demonstrate the connection of the strand to the other strands and to real- life situations. C. The NRT and CRT standards measured are: 1. Strand N: Number and Number Relations a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the real number system and communicate the relationships within that system using a variety of techniques and tools; 2. Strand A: Algebra a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of concepts and processes that allow them to analyze, represent, and describe relationships among variable quantities and to apply algebraic methods to real- world situations; 3. Strand M: Measurement a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of concepts, processes, and real- life applications of measurement; 4. Strand G: Geometry a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of geometric concepts and applications involving one-, two-, and three- dimensional geometry, and justify their findings; 5. Strand D: Data Analysis, Probability, and Discrete Math a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students discover trends, formulate conjectures regarding cause- and- effect relationships, and demonstrate critical- thinking skills in order to make informed decisions; 6. Strand P: Patterns, Relations, and Functions a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of patterns, relations, and functions that represent and explain real- world situations. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 268 ( February 2007), repromulgated LR 33: 1008 ( June 2007). § 1727. Science Tests Structure A. The Science test includes CRT items and has one session. 1. The Science tests use multiple- choice items to assess concepts and skills in all or part of the five strands of science. 2. The Science test is entirely criterion- referenced. All items are based on Louisiana's content standards and aligned with Louisiana's GLEs. B. Science is assessed in grades 3, 5, 6, and 7. 1. Grades 3 and 5 tests assess all five science strands. 2. Grade 6 test assesses three of the five science strands. They are as follows: a. Science as Inquiry; b. Physical Science; and EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 54 c. Science and the Environment. 3. Grade 7 test assesses three of the five science strands. They are as follows: a. Science as Inquiry; b. Life Science; and c. Science and the Environment. C. Each of the five science strands is associated with a single standard. 1. Strand: Science as Inquiry a. Standard. Students will do science by engaging in partial and full inquiries that are within their developmental capabilities. 2. Strand: Physical Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the characteristics and interrelationships of matter and energy in the physical world. 3. Strand: Life Science a. Standard. Students will become aware of the characteristics and life cycles of organisms and understand their relationships to each other and their environment. 4. Strand: Earth and Space Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the properties of earth materials, the structure of Earth's system, Earth's history, and Earth's place in the universe. 5. Strand: Science and the Environment a. Standard. In learning environmental science, students will develop an appreciation of the natural environment, learn the importance of environmental quality, and acquire a sense of stewardship. As consumers and citizens, they will be able to recognize how our personal, professional, and political actions affect the natural world. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 269 ( February 2007), repromulgated LR 33: 1009 ( June 2007). § 1729. Social Studies Tests Structure A. The Social Studies test includes CRT items and has one section. 1. The Social Studies tests use multiple- choice items to assess concepts and skills in all or part of the four content strands: Geography, Civics, Economics, and History. 2. The Social Studies tests is entirely criterion- referenced. All items are based on Louisiana's content standards and aligned with Louisiana's GLEs. B. Social Studies is assessed in grades 3, 5, 6, and 7 are as follows: 1. Grade 3 assesses all four social studies strands; 2. Grades 5 and 6 assess two of the four social studies strands. They are as follows: a. Geography; and b. History. 3. Grade 7 assesses three of the four social studies strands. They are as follows: a. Geography; b. History; and c. Civics. C. The Social Studies strands assessed are as follows. 1. Strand G: Geography: Physical and Cultural Systems a. Standard. Students develop a spatial understanding of Earth's surface and the processes that shape it, the connections between people and places, and the relationship between man and the environment. 2. Strand C: Civics: Citizenship and Government a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of the structure and purposes of government, the foundations of the American democratic system, and the role of the United States in the world while learning about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 3. Strand E: Economics: Interdependence and Decision Making a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of fundamental economic concepts as they apply to the interdependence and decision making of individuals, households, businesses, and governments in the United States and the world. 4. Strand H: History: Time, Continuity, and Change a. Standard. Students develop a sense of historical time and historical perspective as they study the history of their community, state, nation, and world. AUTHORITY NOTE; Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 269 ( February 2007), repromulgated LR 33: 1009 ( June 2007). Chapter 18. End- of- Course Tests Subchapter A. Background § 1801. Overview A. The tests which are both criterion- referenced and standards- based assessments will be available online to high school students beginning fall 2007. The tests will be phased in over a period of five years beginning with Algebra I. In the first years of administration, policies regarding the use of EOCT results shall be determined by the district’s local pupil progression plan. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 55 dministrative Code April 2015 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 214 ( February 2009). Subchapter B. General Provisions § 1803. Introduction A. EOCT will measure the knowledge and skills a student should have mastered by the end of the course. The results of the EOCT will help ensure that all Louisiana students have access to a rigorous curriculum that meets high academic standards. B. EOCT will assess student learning in the high school courses: 1. algebra I; 2. geometry; 3. English II; 4. English III; 5. biology; and 6. U. S. history. C. Any student enrolled in and/ or receiving credit for an EOCT course, regardless of grade inclusive of middle school students taking high school courses for high school credit is required to take the EOCT upon completion of that course. D. EOCT will be offered at the end of the fall and spring semesters. 1. Students completing the course at the end of the fall semester shall participate in the fall test regardless of the grade earned during the fall semester. 2. Students completing the course at the end of the spring semester shall participate in the spring test regardless of the grade earned during the spring semester. E. EOC retests will not be offered until 2010- 2011. F. Since these tests are being developed for use in Louisiana schools, any school selected for field tests shall participate in the field tests. In spring, 2012, the U. S. history field tests will be administered. G. Students completing the following courses will take the Algebra I test: 1. Algebra I: course code 160321; 2. Algebra I, Part 2: course code 160338; 3. Integrated Mathematics I: course code 160339; 4. Algebra I— Middle School: course code 160380. 5. Applied Algebra: course code 160331. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 214 ( February 2009), LR 36: 477 ( March 2010), amended LR 38: 35 ( January 2012), LR 40: 2514 ( December 2014). § 1804. EOCT Development and Implementation Plan [ Formerly § 1805] Course Test Administration Year 1 2008– 2009 Year 2 2009– 2010 Year 3 2010– 2011 Year 4 2011– 2012 Year 5 2012– 2013 Algebra I Field Test Operational Test √ √ √ √ √ English II Field Test Operational Test √ √ √ √ √ Geometry Field Test √ Operational Test √ √ √ √ Biology Field Test √ Operational Test √ √ √ English III Field Test √ Operational Test √ √ U. S. History Field Test √ Operational Test √ NOTE: the field test in the table is the stand- alone field test for the initial item development. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 215 ( February 2009), amended LR 38: 35 ( January 2012), repromulgated LR 39: 76 ( January 2013). Subchapter C. EOC Test Design § 1805. Algebra I Test Structure [ Formerly 1807] A. The Algebra I EOC tests include three sessions, all of which will be administered online: 1. 25— item multiple- choice session in which students may not use calculators; 2. 3— item constructed- response session, in which students may use calculators; and 3. 25— item multiple- choice session in which students may use calculators. B. Student responses to multiple- choice items will be computer- scored. C. Student responses to the constructed- response items will be scored by the contractor. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 215 ( February 2009), repromulgated LR 39: 76 ( January 2013). § 1806. Biology Test Structure [ Formerly § 1808] A. The biology EOC tests include three sessions, all of which will be administered online: 1. 25— item multiple- choice session in which students may not use calculators; 2. 3— item constructed- response session, in which students may use calculators; and EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 56 3. 25— item multiple- choice session in which students may use calculators. B. Student responses to multiple- choice items will be computer- scored. C. Student responses to the constructed- response items will be scored by the contractor. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 38: 35 ( January 2012), repromulgated LR 39: 76 ( January 2013). § 1807. English II Test Structure [ Formerly § 1809] A. The English II EOC tests include three components, all of which will be administered online: 1. 2 multiple- choice sessions with 24 items each; and 2. 1 writing session which requires a response to a prompt. B. Three of the following components will appear on every test: 1. paired poems; 2. a drama excerpt; 3. a short story or novel excerpt; or 4. a nonfiction passage. C. Two discrete items will appear on every test. NOTE: A discrete item is not passage- related but stands alone: 1. items related to using information resources; and 2. items related to writing conventions. D. The writing performance session consists of a single writing prompt that students respond to based on the body of literature they have encountered in their English II courses, or extracurricular reading. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 215 ( February 2009), repromulgated LR 39: 76 ( January 2013). § 1808. Geometry Test Structure [ Formerly § 1810] A. The Geometry EOC test includes three sessions, all of which will be administered online: 1. 25- item multiple- choice session in which students may not use calculators; 2. 3- item constructed- response session, in which students may use calculators; and 3. 25- item multiple- choice session in which students may use calculators. B. Student responses to multiple- choice items will be computer- scored. C. Student responses to the constructed- response items will be scored by the contractor. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 37: 859 ( March 2011), repromulgated LR 39: 76 ( January 2013). § 1809. U. S. History Test Structure A. The U. S. history EOC test includes three sessions, all of which will be administered online: 1. 23– item multiple- choice session; 2. 2– item short answer session; and 3. 23– item multiple- choice session. B. Student responses to multiple- choice items will be computer- scored. C. Student responses to the constructed- response items will be scored by the contractor. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 76 ( January 2013). § 1810. English III Test Structure A. The English III EOC test includes three sessions, all of which will be administered online: 1. one writing session, which requires a response to a prompt using the provided resources as support; and 2. two sessions with multiple- choice items. B. The two multiple- choice sessions will consist of four reading passages and their related items. The passages selected will come from the following periods of American literature: 1. the Colonial Period or Revolutionary Period; 2. the National Period or the Civil War Period; 3. the Rise of Realism and Naturalism; and 4. the Early Years of the Twentieth Century. C. The multiple- choice sessions also include discrete items. A discrete item is not passage- related but stands alone: 1. items related to using information resources; and 2. items related to writing conventions. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 76 ( January 2013). Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 57 dministrative Code April 2015 Subchapter D. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards § 1811. EOCT Achievement Levels A. 1. The Louisiana EOCT achievement levels are: a. excellent; b. good; c. fair; d. needs improvement. B. Achievement Level Definitions 1. Excellent— a student at this achievement level has demonstrated mastery of course content beyond Good. 2. Good— a student at this achievement level has demonstrated mastery of course content and is well prepared for the next level of coursework in the subject area. 3. Fair— a student at this achievement level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of coursework in the subject area. 4. Needs Improvement— a student at this achievement level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of coursework in the subject area. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 215 ( February 2009). § 1813. Performance Standards A. Performance standards for EOCT algebra I, English II, geometry, biology, English III, and U. S. history tests are finalized in scaled- score form. B. EOCT Achievement Levels and Scaled- Score Ranges 1. Algebra I Scaled- Score Ranges Algebra I Achievement Level Scaled- Score Ranges Excellent 739- 800 Good 700- 738 Fair 668- 699 Needs Improvement 600- 667 2. English II Scaled- Score Ranges English II Achievement Level Scaled- Score Ranges Excellent 739- 800 Good 700- 738 Fair 668- 699 Needs Improvement 600- 667 3. Geometry Scaled- Score Ranges Geometry Achievement Level Scaled- Score Ranges Excellent 731- 800 Geometry Achievement Level Scaled- Score Ranges Good 700- 730 Fair 665- 699 Needs Improvement 600- 664 4. Biology Scaled- Score Ranges Biology Achievement Level Scaled- Score Ranges Excellent 740- 800 Good 700- 739 Fair 661- 699 Needs Improvement 600- 660 5. English III Scaled- Score Ranges English III Achievement Level Scaled- Score Ranges Excellent 741- 800 Good 700- 740 Fair 661- 699 Needs Improvement 600- 660 6. U. S. History Achievement Level U. S. History Scaled- Score Ranges Excellent 748- 800 Good 700- 747 Fair 665- 699 Needs Improvement 600- 664 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 215 ( February 2009), amended LR 36: 478 ( March 2010), LR 37: 820 ( March 2011), repromulgated LR 37: 1123 ( April 2011), amended LR 38: 35 ( January 2012), LR 39: 76 ( January 2013), LR 39: 2444 ( September 2013). Subchapter E. Achievement Level Descriptors § 1815. Introduction A. Achievement level descriptors for Louisiana assessments were developed by committees composed of Louisiana educators who represented the subjects and grades assessed. The descriptors define what a student should know and be able to do at each achievement level for each subject assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 215 ( February 2009). § 1817. EOCT Achievement Level Descriptors A. Algebra I Achievement Level Descriptors EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 58 Excellent Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. identify the common characteristics of families of linear functions; 2. recognize a linear or nonlinear relationship for data organized in charts or tables; 3. determine whether two linear equations have parallel or perpendicular graphs; 4. solve systems of inequalities; 5. determine geometric probabilities based on the areas of figures; and 6. compare and contrast linear functions algebraically in terms of their rates of change. Good Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. translate between tabular and algebraic representations of real- life situations; 2. compute simple probabilities; 3. select and use appropriate units of measurement in the metric system; 4. analyze real- life relationships that can be modeled by tables representing linear functions; 5. translate among tabular, algebraic, and function notation in real- life situations; 6. make appropriate translations between verbal and symbolic representations; 7. describe characteristics of parallel lines; 8. calculate combinations and permutations to solve problems; and 9. recognize differences among number systems ( e. g., whole numbers and irrational numbers). Fair Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. represent and use linear functions to solve real- life problems; 2. select and use appropriate units of measurement to solve problems; 3. translate between tabular and graphical representations of real- life situations; 4. use appropriate function notation when given a verbal statement; 5. use the graph of a linear equation to describe and interpret slope, intercept, point; and 6. evaluate numerical expressions involving positive exponents. Needs Improvement Students at this achievement level are generally working toward the ability to: 1. use linear functions to solve real- life problems; 2. select and use appropriate units of measurement to solve problems; and 3. translate between tabular and graphical representations of real- life situations. B. English II Achievement Level Descriptors Excellent Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. evenly develop and elaborate ideas in written compositions using well- chosen evidence to support the central idea; 2. develop written compositions that demonstrate evidence of planning and a logical progression of ideas; 3. use precise and effective language to establish voice in written compositions; 4. differentiate formal adverb use from colloquial use; 5. determine effects of complex literary elements and devices; 6. interpret literary images to make inferences about meaning; 7. analyze elements of humor and purposes of rhetorical devices; 8. compare literary elements and devices across texts; 9. synthesize information within and across texts to draw conclusions; and 10. evaluate usefulness, relevance, and objectivity of information resources. Good Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. include a clear central idea and use relevant evidence and elaboration in written compositions; 2. use varied vocabulary when writing compositions; 3. include sentences that vary in length and structure when writing compositions; 4. recognize errors in verb tense; 5. derive word meanings from roots, prefixes, and suffixes; 6. recognize how an author's word choice relates to tone and purpose; 7. analyze literary devices to identify recurring themes; 8. make inferences about character motivation based on passage details; 9. examine a sequence of information to determine meaning; 10. make predictions based on information or details provided; and 11. determine appropriateness of research sources. Fair Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. develop written compositions with evidence of conscious organization; 2. include some relevant information when writing compositions; 3. use sentences with some varied beginnings when writing compositions; 4. identify fragments and run- on sentences; 5. recognize basic literary elements and devices; 6. summarize information from grade- appropriate texts; 7. extend ideas in texts by making simple inferences; 8. recognize uses of various research sources; and 9. evaluate results of an online search. Needs Improvement Students at this achievement level are generally working toward the ability to: 1. develop written compositions with evidence of conscious organization; 2. use sentences with some varied beginnings when writing compositions; 3. summarize information from grade- appropriate texts; 4. extend ideas in texts by making simple inferences; and 5. evaluate results of an online search. C. Geometry Achievement Level Descriptors Excellent Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. define and use trigonometric ratios to solve problems involving right triangles; 2. understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem in multi- step problems; 3. solve problems in coordinate geometry involving distances; 4. write equations of parallel lines; and 5. find arc lengths of circles. Good Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. solve multi- step problems using properties of radii, chords, secants, and tangents of a circle; 2. write an equation of a line of best fit; 3. calculate the probability of a simple, conditional event; 4. solve real- world and mathematical problems involving volume and surface area of spheres; 5. build a function that models a relationship between two quantities; 6. perform and/ or analyze dilations of geometric figures; 7. use similarity criteria for triangles to solve multi- step problems; and 8. analyze and use proportional relationships to solve real- world and mathematical problems. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 59 dministrative Code April 2015 Fair Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. calculate the volume of a solid when given a diagram; 2. calculate a missing side length using similar triangles; 3. identify a geometric solid when given a set of attributes; 4. describe or interpret patterns in measurement data; 5. derive a rule for a pattern in a number sequence; 6. solve one- step, real- world problems using proportional reasoning; 7. identify the type of transformation performed on a geometric figure; 8. use discrete math ( elections, fair games, flow maps, color maps, etc.) and a given set of conditions to determine possible outcomes; and 9. identify a correct informal proof. Needs Improvement Students at this achievement level are generally working toward the ability to: 1. solve one- step, real- world problems using proportional reasoning; 2. identify the type of transformation performed on a geometric figure; 3. use discrete math ( elections, fair games, flow maps, color maps, etc.) and a given set of conditions to determine possible outcomes; and 4. identify a correct informal proof. D. Biology Achievement Level Descriptors Excellent Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. design an appropriate experiment that includes a hypothesis, variables, and controls; 2. analyze the role of the Sun in living systems and various biological processes; 3. analyze biogeochemical cycles and how components relate to a specific ecosystem; 4. analyze the components and energy flow in food webs and ecosystems, and predict how populations will be impacted by changes; 5. differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells using structural and functional differences among organelles; 6. compare active and passive transport; 7. analyze balanced equations of photosynthesis and cellular respiration; 8. create and use a Punnett square to calculate the probabilities of the genotypes and phenotypes of offspring; and 9. evaluate and describe the impact of emerging technologies on society. Good Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. determine the validity of a conclusion by analyzing experimental data; 2. identify and describe the components of the biogeochemical cycles; 3. use radioactive elements to determine the age of earth materials; 4. calculate the energy transfer between trophic levels of an energy pyramid; 5. analyze and compare the movement of molecules across a cell membrane; 6. explain and evaluate the roles and uses of ATP in a cell; 7. explain and compare the stages of an organism's development, including mitosis and meiosis; 8. compare the structure, function, and interrelationships of organ systems and their components among various organisms and within humans; 9. compare the structures, functions, and cycles of viruses to those of cells; 10. determine the relationship between vaccination and immunity; and 11. evaluate various methods of disease transmission and prevention. Fair Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. identify appropriate lab safety measures and equipment; 2. interpret data and/ or a graph to draw appropriate conclusions; 3. describe how organisms respond to different stimuli; 4. determine and compare ages of rock layers, with and without fossils; 5. apply various evolutionary models and the fossil record to explain relationships between organisms; 6. explain how specific behaviors contribute to various species’ survival; 7. describe the role of enzymes in living systems; 8. recognize the basic structure and components of a nucleic acid; 9. describe the relationship between DNA, genes, chromosomes, and proteins; 10. identify and compare organisms using a dichotomous key; and 11. analyze and describe how organisms maintain homeostasis. Needs Improvement Students at this achievement level are generally working toward the ability to: 1. identify appropriate lab safety measures and equipment; 2. interpret data and/ or a graph to draw appropriate conclusions; 3. describe how organisms respond to different stimuli; 4. explain how specific behaviors contribute to various species’ survival; and 5. describe the relationship between DNA, genes, chromosomes, and proteins. E. English III Achievement Level Descriptors Excellent Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. develop essays that integrate well- chosen evidence to support the central idea; 2. produce essays that contain varied and fluent sentences; 3. revise sentences for correct use of subjunctive mood ; 4. determine the main idea when it is implicit in a complex text ; 5. develop conclusions based on information synthesized from the text ; 6. analyze an author’s use of complex literary elements in a text ; 7. evaluate arguments in a complex text; 8. demonstrate an understanding of persuasive techniques; 9. evaluate claims in information resources using evidence; and 10. synthesize information from multiple information resources. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 60 Good Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. write essays that are focused and include appropriate elaboration; 2. write essays that include a clear organizational structure and incorporate appropriate vocabulary; 3. revise phrases in a sentence for correct use of parallel structure; 4. draw conclusions based on information stated in a complex text; 5. interpret the author’s use of language in a complex text; 6. determine overall purpose of a complex text; 7. summarize information in a complex text; 8. predict outcomes based on textual evidence; 9. evaluate the usefulness of resources; and 10. determine the reliability or objectivity of information resources. Fair Students at this achievement level generally have exhibited the ability to: 1. write essays that provide sufficient and relevant evidence and supporting details; 2. write essays that have a consistent voice and varied sentence structure; 3. revise sentences to avoid split infinitives; 4. select a synonym for a given vocabulary word in a text; 5. identify the main idea based on information stated in a text; 6. make simple inferences based on information in a text; 7. use reasoning skills to draw conclusions; 8. determine the meaning of figurative language in a text; 9. identify relevant information from a variety of resources; and 10. use information from graphic organizers. Needs Improvement Students at this achievement level are generally working toward the ability to: 1. write essays that provide sufficient and relevant evidence and supporting details; 2. revise sentences to avoid split infinitives; 3. identify the main idea based on information stated in a text; 4. use reasoning skills to draw conclusions; and 5. identify relevant information from a variety of resources. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 35: 216 ( February 2009), amended LR 36: 478 ( March 2010), LR 37: 820 ( March 2011), repromulgated LR 37: 1123 ( April 2011), amended LR 38: 36 ( January 2012), LR 39: 76 ( January 2013), LR 39: 1020 ( April 2013). Subchapter F. EOCT Administrative Rules § 1819. Double Jeopardy Rule A. If a school administers an EOC test that the student has already passed and the student scores needs improvement on the retest, the passing score will be used to determine the student’s eligibility for a standard high school diploma. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 977 ( May 2010). § 1821. First Cohort A. The first cohort comprises students who were first- time ninth graders in 2010– 2011 and all first- time ninth graders thereafter. First cohort students are required to score Fair or above on EOC English II or English III, Algebra I or Geometry, and Biology or U. S. history to be eligible for a standard high school diploma. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 977 ( May 2010), amended LR 38: 36 ( January 2012). § 1823. Rescores A. The district test coordinator must file a request with the scoring contractor within 20 working days from the date the school district receives the individual student scores. All requests must be made on or before the deadline date identified by the testing contractor and the LDE. Requests received after the deadline will not be honored. B. Only rescores of tests from the most recent administration may be requested. C. All requests for rescoring require a fee, which is established by and paid to the scoring contractor. D. Students may request a rescore of their EOC tests at specified achievement levels and scaled score ranges. If the following criteria is met, the rescore will be expedited: 1. The test has a scaled score ten points below the fair achievement level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 977 ( May 2010), amended LR 37: 820 ( March 2011). § 1825. EOC Administration Rules A. Students enrolled in EOC courses shall take the EOC test for that course at the conclusion of the course. B. If a district holds graduation prior to the release of test scores, the LEA must have in place a policy for graduation without the test scores. C. There is no ending age limit for students to retest in EOC, nor is there a limit on the number of times the student may retake the test. Students who no longer reside in the school district where he/ she completed Carnegie units may test in the current school district of residence. The DTC shall forward the passing test scores to the high school where the Carnegie units reside. D. If a student was issued a GED diploma and subsequently meets the requirements for the EOC, the student may surrender the GED diploma and be issued a standard high school diploma. E. When administrative errors are made in testing, the state superintendent of education may determine how to remedy the error. F. Students who wish to retest for the Louisiana high school diploma endorsements may retest during the fall retest administration only one time for each EOC test. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 61 dministrative Code April 2015 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 977 ( May 2010), amended LR 39: 77 ( January 2013). § 1827. EOC Retest Administration A. Students who did not score Fair or above on an EOC test may retest in the next EOC administration. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 978 ( May 2010). § 1829. EOC Transfer Rules A. The following rules apply for transfer students who are Louisiana residents transferring into the Louisiana public school district from out- of- state schools, nonpublic schools, or approved home study programs. 1. A transfer student is not required to take the EOC tests for courses he/ she already successfully completed for Carnegie credit. 2. A transfer student shall be required to take the EOC test for courses he/ she previously took but did not pass. 3. A transfer student may choose to take an EOC test for a course he/ she already successfully completed if he/ she scored Needs Improvement on an EOC test in another course and the student must pass the EOC test for one of the EOC pairs. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 978 ( May 2010), amended LR 37: 820 ( March 2011). § 1831. College and Career Diploma A. Refer to Bulletin 741: Louisiana’s Handbook for School Administrators. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 37: 821 ( March 2011). Chapter 19. LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 Subchapter A. Background § 1900. Sunset Provision A. Beginning academic year 2010- 2011, grade 9 LAA 1 tests will no longer be administered. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 37: 821 ( March 2011). § 1901. Overview A. The LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 ( LAA 1), is a specially designed assessment program that evaluates students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. LAA 1 represents an assessment of extended standards relative to the general education components of the Louisiana state assessment program ( i. e., LEAP, iLEAP, and GEE). As such, it meets NCLB requirements to assess students with the most significant cognitive disabilities in the state ( sometimes called " 1 percent" students), with its results contributing to school, district, and state accountability decisions. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1556 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 239 ( February 2006), LR 33: 425 ( March 2007), LR 35: 208 ( February 2009). Subchapter B. General Provisions § 1903. Introduction A. The LAA 1 is a performance- based student assessment that evaluates each student’s knowledge and skills in the Louisiana content standards using extended standards ( ES). 1. LAA 1 correlates to the ESs that are extensions of the state academic content standards. 2. The ESs capture the essence of the content standards and provide a way for students with significant cognitive disabilities to access the general education curriculum. B. Three levels of academic complexity related to each ES provide instructional access for students with varying academic abilities. 1. The ESs are organized in four grade spans that represent the core academic content considered appropriate for students taking LAA 1 at each grade span: a. grades 3- 4; b. grades 5- 6; c. grades 7- 8; and d. grades 9- 11. C. Definitions Alternate Assessment— a substitute approach used in gathering information on the performance of students who do not participate in typical state assessments. ( from Alternate Assessment Resource Matrix [ CCSSO, SCASS- ASES, 1999]. Content Standards— broad statements of what students should know and be able to do. Benchmarks— define the standards more specifically. GLEs— state what all students should know and be able to do at the end of a given grade level. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 62 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 425 ( March 2007), amended LR 35: 208 ( February 2009). Subchapter C. Target Population § 1905. Participation Criteria ( Refer to Bulletin 1530— Louisiana’s IEP Handbook for Students with Disabilities) AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 425 ( March 2007), repromulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student Performance, LR 35: 209 ( February 2009). Subchapter D. LAA 1 Test Design § 1907. Test Structure A. LAA 1 is organized by grade spans. Content Area Grade Span Skill Area English Language Arts 3- 10 Writing Reading Using Information Resources Listening 25 performance tasks distributed across the 4 test components Mathematics 3- 10 Numbers Measurement and Geometry Data Algebra and Patterns 25 performance tasks distributed across the 4 test components Science 4, 8, and 11 Science as Inquiry Physical Science Life Science Earth, Space, and Environmental Science 25 performance tasks distributed across the 4 test components Notes: Quantities of performance tasks are approximate and will not exceed the number noted. Quantities of performance tasks aligned to each component will vary. The Earth, Space, and Environmental Science Component is not assessed in grade 11. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 425 ( March 2007), amended LR 35: 209 ( February 2009). § 1909. Scoring A. The scoring rubric for the LAA 1 is based on a 0 to 2 point or a 0 to 1 point scale according to an item- specific rubric. 1. Two point tasks allow the possibility of a partially correct response. 2. One point tasks are either correct or incorrect. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 426 ( March 2007), amended LR 35: 209 ( February 2009). Subchapter E. Alternate Achievement Levels and Performance Standards § 1911. LAA 1 Alternate Achievement Levels A. 1 The Louisiana LAA 1 alternate achievement levels are: a. exceeds standard; b. meets standard; and c. working toward standard. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance LR 33: 426 ( March 2007), amended LR 35: 209 ( February 2009). § 1913. Performance Standards A. Performance standards for LAA 1 English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science tests are finalized in scaled- score form. B. LAA 1 Alternate Achievement Levels and Scaled- Score Growth Ranges 1. English Language Arts and Mathematics Scaled Score Ranges Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled- Score Ranges Grade Span 3- 4 Grade Span 5- 6 Grade Span 7- 8 Grade Span 9- 10 Exceeds Standard 840- 900 840- 900 848- 900 845- 900 Meets Standard 810- 839 810- 839 810- 847 810- 844 Working Toward Standard 700- 809 700- 809 700- 809 700- 809 Mathematics Scaled- Score Ranges Achievement Level Grade Span 3- 4 Grade Span 5- 6 Grade Span 7- 8 Grade Span 9- 10 Exceeds Standard 845- 900 843- 900 846- 900 840- 900 Meets Standard 810- 844 810- 842 810- 845 810- 839 Working Toward Standard 700- 809 700- 809 700- 809 700- 809 2. Science Scaled Score Ranges Science Scaled- Score Ranges Achievement Level Grade 4 Grade 8 Grade 11 Exceeds Standard 845- 900 850- 900 838- 900 Meets 810- 844 810- 849 810- 837 Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 63 dministrative Code April 2015 Standard Working Toward Standard 700- 809 700- 809 700- 809 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1– 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 426 ( March 2007), amended LR 35: 209 ( February 2009). Subchapter F. Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors § 1915. Introduction A. Alternate achievement level descriptors for Louisiana assessments were developed by committees composed of Louisiana educators who represented the subjects and grades assessed. The descriptors define what a student should know and be able to do at each achievement level for each subject assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 426 ( March 2007), amended LR 35: 210 ( February 2009). § 1917. Grade Span 3- 4 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade Span 3- 4 English Language Arts Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. determine the meaning of a word that has a prefix or a suffix; 2. identify the main character in a story; 3. identify the main idea in texts; 4. identify the sequence of events ( i. e., beginning and end) of texts; 5. locate specific information in texts when given more than five choices; 6. identify the central idea and logical sequence of a written composition; 7. identify the parts of an informal letter; 8. identify a step in a given set of familiar two- step directions; 9. respond to a question using two or more words; and 10. determine the sequence of events on a daily schedule. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify two words that use the same prefix or suffix; 2. identify two characters in a story; 3. identify two ideas in texts; 4. identify the beginning of a sequence of events in a text; 5. locate specific information in texts when given five choices; 6. construct a simple sentence or phrase with a central idea; 7. identify an item in a list; 8. identify a step in a set of familiar one- step directions; 9. respond to a question with a one- word answer other than yes or no; and 10. locate “ Which comes next?” on a daily schedule. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. identify a word with a prefix or a suffix; 2. identify one character in a story; 3. identify one idea in texts; 4. identify the end of a sequence of events in a text; 5. locate specific information in texts when given three choices; 6. identify the central idea in a simple sentence or phrase; 7. identify the location for a signature; 8. respond to a simple one- word command; 9. respond to a simple yes or no question; and 10. locate a single event on a daily schedule. B. Grade Span 3- 4 Mathematics Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. read and/ or write numbers to a specific place value; 2. order sets of objects by less than, more than, most, or least; 3. solve real- world problems using addition or subtraction; 4. calculate the amount of money needed for a purchase or activity; 5. use visual representations or objects to represent a problem; 6. measure lengths of objects and select appropriate measurement units and/ or tools for a given situation; 7. tell time to the hour and use a clock to match times with activities; 8. recognize and apply positional concepts; 9. construct simple two- dimensional shapes; 10. identify events as possible or impossible and/ or likely or unlikely; 11. make predictions about outcomes of daily events; and 12. extend a simple pattern. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify numbers to a specific place value; 2. show that equal means the same as; 3. identify a set of objects with “ more”; 4. identify simple addition and subtraction concepts in daily living; 5. sort and/ or identify coins and dollars; 6. identify a picture sequence that completes a routine task; 7. identify the difference between long and short; 8. use measurement tools for a specific activity; 9. associate activities with various times of day; 10. follow simple spatial directions; 11. sort two- dimensional shapes and/ or objects by common and/ or different attributes; 12. identify the next event in a routine; and 13. identify a simple pattern. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. count objects to a given number; 2. count to solve simple problems; 3. identify the exchange of money as a means to make a purchase; 4. select pictures or symbols that show a pattern; 5. select objects of the same length; 6. recognize basic measurement tools; 7. identify simple directional concepts; 8. recognize two- dimensional shapes; and 9. match a simple pattern to another pattern. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 426 ( March 2007), amended LR 35: 2210 ( February 2009). § 1919. Grade Span 5- 6 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade Span 5- 6 English Language Arts Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 64 Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify a content- specific vocabulary word that best completes a simple sentence or phrase; 2. identify a character trait of the main character in a story; 3. identify the beginning, middle, and end of a text; 4. identify what happened last and predict what will happen next in a text; 5. identify a cause and an effect in a text; 6. use an appropriate transition word ( first, then, next, or last) to sequence events in a written composition; 7. identify an evaluation of media ( e. g., film, performance, field trip); 8. identify a step in a set of three- step directions; 9. respond to a question using three or more words; and 10. answer a question about information on a calendar. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. identify content- specific vocabulary words; 2. identify the main character and another character in a story; 3. identify the middle of a text; 4. predict what will happen next in a text; 5. identify a cause or an effect in a text; 6. use an appropriate transition word ( first, then, next) in a short composition ( one or two sentences); 7. identify parts of an informal letter; 8. identify a step in an unfamiliar set of two- step directions; 9. respond to a question using two words; and 10. locate information on a calendar. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. identify a content- specific vocabulary word; 2. identify the main character in a story; 3. identify the beginning and end of a text; 4. predict what will happen last in a text; 5. skim or scan a text to locate specific information; 6. use the transition word first to correctly sequence two events in a composition; 7. identify the item that best completes a list of two items; 8. identify a step in a familiar set of two- step directions; 9. respond to a question with a one- word answer and; 10. identify a calendar from among similar items. B. Grade Span 5- 6 Mathematics Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify the fraction associated with a given model; 2. solve real- life problems using addition or subtraction; 3. order numbers or fractions by less than, more than, most, and/ or least; 4. use next- dollar strategy to make a purchase and determine the specific bills or coins needed for a purchase; 5. determine if a given number is sufficient for a given situation; 6. use visual representations or objects to model a problem or situation; 7. measure during daily living activities; 8. sort items according to weight, capacity, length, temperature, and/ or time; 9. order a minimum of three items according to weight, capacity, length, temperature, or time; 10. sort shapes according to dimensions; 11. find the horizontal or vertical length of a path between two points on a grid; 12. organize and display data using tables, charts, and/ or graphs; and 13. find the missing element in a pattern; Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. match geometric models of fractions with real- life models of fractions; 2. identify simple addition and subtraction concepts in real life; 3. identify a set of objects with “ more”; 4. show that equal means the same as; 5. identify and write/ state money amounts; 6. match visual representations or objects to a given problem or situation; 7. sort items according to one of the following: more or less, long or short, heavy or light, early or late, day or night, hot or cold; 8. sort two- dimensional shapes and/ or objects with common and/ or different attributes; 9. identify three- dimensional shapes; 10. select a route from one specific point to another; 11. interpret tables, charts, and/ or graphs about daily activities; and 12. extend a pattern. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. identify the number of parts an object is divided into; 2. count to solve simple problems; 3. sort and/ or identify coins and dollars; 4. identify a picture sequence that completes a routine task; 5. select objects of similar measurement; 6. identify two- dimensional shapes; 7. identify locations on a map or floor plan; 8. select appropriate pictures or symbols for a chart; and 9. identify a pattern. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 35: 210 ( February 2009). § 1921. Grade Span 7- 8 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade Span 7- 8 English Language Arts Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. determine the meaning of a noun or verb, which has a prefix or suffix, from its known root; 2. identify changes in the setting within one or more stories; 3. predict the outcome of a text; 4. complete an “ if… then” statement from information found within a given text; 5. identify the main idea and the beginning, middle, and end of a composition; 6. determine placement of information on an application; 7. identify one step of a familiar four- step procedure or routine; and 8. use information on a calendar. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify the change in meaning of nouns or verbs when a prefix or suffix is added; 2. identify one setting in a story; 3. identify the main idea of a text; 4. identify a cause- and- effect relationship in a text; 5. identify the main idea and some details in written phrases or sentences; 6. determine placement of parts of a friendly letter; 7. identify one step of an unfamiliar simple procedure or task; and 8. identify changes in a daily schedule. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 65 dministrative Code April 2015 Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. identify the change in meaning of a noun or verb when a prefix or suffix is added; 2. identify the main character and one of the character’s traits; 3. identify the sequence of events in a text; 4. identify a cause or an effect in a text; 5. identify the chronological or sequential order in written phrases or sentences; 6. identify an evaluation of media ( e. g., a television show, a radio broadcast, art); 7. identify one step of a familiar, simple multistep procedure or routine; and 8. identify the sequence of activities in a daily schedule. B. Grade Span 7- 8 Mathematics Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify fractions associated with a given model; 2. identify money denominations including amounts with decimals in daily- living situations; 3. order by less than, more than, most, and/ or least; 4. identify a model of a given multiplication problem; 5. use visual representations or objects to model a situation; 6. order a minimum of three items according to weight, capacity, length, temperature, or time; 7. recognize a model of a turn; 8. apply positional concepts; 9. find the horizontal and vertical lengths of a path between two points on a grid; 10. create a chart of information using pictures or symbols; 11. identify events as possible or impossible and/ or likely or unlikely; 12. make predictions about outcomes of daily events; and 13. reproduce a pattern. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify a number as a whole number, fraction, or decimal; 2. identify a set of objects with “ more”; 3. count the number of groups; 4. solve real- world problems using addition or subtraction; 5. match visual representations or objects to a given situation; 6. sort items according to one of the following: more or less, long or short, heavy or light, early or late, day or night, hot or cold; 7. sort items according to weight, capacity, length, temperature, and/ or time; 8. recognize positional concepts; 9. select a route from one specific point to another; 10. compare data in tables, charts, and/ or graphs; and 11. find the missing element in a pattern. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. show that equal means the same as; 2. count the objects in a group; 3. identify a picture sequence that completes a routine task; 4. follow simple spatial directions; 5. identify locations on a map and/ or a floor plan; 6. use tables, charts, and/ or graphs to locate information in daily activities; 7. identify the next event in a routine; and 8. extend a pattern. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 35: 211 ( February 2009). § 1923. Grade Span 9- 10 Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade Span 9- 10 English Language Arts Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. determine the meaning of a word with a prefix ( dis-) or a suffix (- er, - est); 2. identify the main idea in a passage; 3. compare or contrast literary elements ( e. g., character, character traits, setting) or ideas within a passage; 4. differentiate fact from opinion in texts; 5. identify the introduction, supporting details, and conclusion of a written composition; 6. determine placement of information on a business letter; 7. identify steps in a set of detailed instructions for a complex procedure or task; and 8. identify the appropriate graphic organizer to use to locate specific information. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify a second word that uses the same prefix ( dis-) or a suffix (- er, - est); 2. identify details, events, or ideas in a passage; 3. draw a conclusion from information in texts; 4. identify an opinion in texts; 5. identify the central idea and supporting details in a composition; 6. determine placement of information on a letter of request; 7. identify steps in a detailed set of instructions for an unfamiliar procedure or task; and 8. respond to a question about information found on a timeline. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. identify a word that uses a prefix ( dis-) or a suffix (- er, - est); 2. describe the setting of a passage; 3. draw an inference from texts; 4. locate a fact in texts; 5. identify a central idea in a composition; 6. determine placement of information on a job application; 7. identify steps in a detailed set of instructions for a familiar procedure or routine; and 8. locate specified information on a timeline. B. Grade Span 9- 10 Mathematics Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify a model of a given division or multiplication problem; 2. solve real- life problems using proportional reasoning; 3. use visual representations or objects to solve an equation; 4. determine the area or perimeter of an object using given standard or nonstandard units; 5. find the horizontal and vertical length of a path between two points on a grid; 6. recognize a model of a translation; 7. solve a problem or answer questions using data from a chart or graph; 8. make predictions about outcomes of daily events; and 9. reproduce a pattern. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 66 Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. solve real- world problems using addition or subtraction; 2. determine the number of objects in two comparison groups; 3. use visual representations or objects to model an equation; 4. distinguish between area and perimeter; 5. select a route from one specific point to another; 6. recognize and apply positional concepts; 7. compare data in tables, charts, and/ or graphs; 8. identify events as possible or impossible or likely or unlikely; and 9. find the missing element in a pattern. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. identify a model of one- to- one correspondence; 2. identify a picture sequence to complete a routine task; 3. identify locations on a map and/ or floor plan; 4. follow simple spatial directions; 5. use tables, charts, and/ or graphs to locate information in daily activities; 6. identify the next event in a routine; and 7. extend a pattern. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 35: 212 ( February 2009). § 1925. LAA 1 Science Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors A. LAA 1 Grade 4 Science Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. ask appropriate questions about organisms or events in the environment; 2. use appropriate sensory descriptions to communicate about an observation and use an appropriate tool to extend a sensory observation; 3. identify appropriate safety equipment needed in a specific event; 4. identify a characteristic, material, or state of matter for sorting a set of objects; 5. push or pull to move an object to a specific location; 6. identify uses of energy in common settings; 7. identify basic needs that are common to both plants and animals; 8. match plant parts to their functions or parts of the human skeletal system to their functions; 9. sequence the stages of the life cycle of a bean plant or human growth from birth to adulthood; 10. match common animals to different habitat types; 11. select appropriate clothing for specific weather conditions; 12. identify differences in representations of spring, summer, fall, and winter; and 13. match multiple human- made items with the natural resources from which they were made. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. select one of the five senses to make a specific observation or the correct tool to use to extend that sense; 2. recognize the correct use of safety equipment; 3. sort objects based on a single characteristic, material, or state of matter; 4. follow directions to push or pull an object; 5. sort by common uses of energy; 6. select more than one basic need of plants or animals and match common animals to a habitat type; 7. identify the same plant part on different plants or match parts of the skeletal system to their location in the human body; 8. recognize the correct sequence of the life cycle of a bean plant or the general relationship between human growth and age; 9. sort appropriate clothing by basic weather conditions or sequence morning, noon, and night; and 10. identify human- made items. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. recognize an object, part of an organism, or an event that is inconsistent with a group; 2. match descriptions or pictures with the correct sensory organ; 3. recognize a use of energy, a tool, or safety equipment; 4. imitate pushing or pulling an object; 5. select a basic need of plants or animals or match a common animal to a habitat type; 6. recognize a plant part or part of the human skeletal system; 7. recognize a part of the life cycle of a bean plant or that persons of the same age grow at different rates; and 8. recognize a change in basic weather conditions or identify representations of daytime and nighttime. B. LAA 1 Grade 8 Science Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify two or more steps in proper sequence to solve a science problem; 2. recognize the highest or lowest example of varying conditions ( hot- cold, long- short, heavy- light) by using a measurement tool; 3. sequence the steps of a pattern based on a scenario or identify a simple graph that represents a specific situation; 4. identify hazardous situations and match appropriate technology to common tasks ; 5. describe how the state of water changes under varying temperature conditions; 6. match different actions to corresponding changes in the motion of objects; 7. identify changes in an object’s temperature as it is subjected to different temperatures; 8. sequence how food travels from one organ to another in the human digestive system; 9. recognize individuals’ features that identify them as being in a specific stage of their life span; 10. identify different ways to prevent disease transmission; 11. identify familiar human traits that children and their parents may have in common; 12. identify several animals that live in the same habitat; 13. identify an adaptation that helps a plant or animal live in a specific Louisiana habitat; 14. modify an activity based on a changing sequence of weather conditions represented by symbols; 15. identify basic characteristics of Earth, the Moon, and the Sun; and 16. identify a polluted area and the cause. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. select two or more steps to solve a simple science problem; 2. match correctly recorded measurements of length, weight, or temperature; 3. select a description or graphic that best represents a set of data or complete the next step in a pattern; 4. select appropriate ways to complete science tasks safely or recognize the appropriate use of technology; 5. match water in solid, liquid, and gaseous states to different temperature conditions; 6. select an action that results in an increase in speed or change in direction of a moving object or recognize that heat can transfer from one object to another; 7. locate organs in the human digestive system; 8. recognize a correct sequence of stages in the human life span; 9. recognize that germs may be transmitted directly or indirectly; 10. sort animals by common traits or match familiar animals to their appropriate habitats; 11. match adaptation ( e. g., method of movement) to habitat; 12. match weather symbols to descriptions of different weather Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 67 dministrative Code April 2015 conditions or recognize differences between Earth, the Moon, and the Sun; and 13. sort polluted and unpolluted areas. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. recognize similar patterns in data; 2. recognize measurement tools, technology, or safety procedures; 3. identify ways to stop or slow the motion of objects; 4. sort objects that are being heated or cooled or recognize that water has three states; 5. recognize a basic organ in the human digestive system or that common diseases are caused by germs; 6. sort individuals according to life- span stages; 7. recognize differences in animal characteristics, physical adaptations, or habitats; 8. recognize that symbols are used to represent different weather conditions, Earth, the Moon, or the Sun; and 9. recognize a polluted area. C. LAA 1 Grade 11 Science Alternate Achievement Level Descriptors Exceeds Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. identify a step necessary to complete a given scientific investigation or that performing processes in their proper order affects safety; 2. make an appropriate selection based on data or identify how technology can improve information gathering; 3. identify the difference between mixtures and compounds or how objects in a given mixture, having similar properties of color, shape, and size, can be easily separated by using their magnetic properties or density: whether they sink or float in water; 4. match how the motion of an object on a level surface changes as the surface texture varies due to the use of different common surface materials; 5. identify the presence of hazardous situations involving different uses of energy; 6. compare the life cycles of a frog and a given mammal; 7. assemble a basic food chain; 8. identify structural relationships between the parts of the circulatory system and the functions of each part; 9. identify how fitness activities improve one’s health; 10. identify different healthy activities and/ or diets; and identify different unhealthy activities and/ or diets that contribute to a person’s susceptibility to becoming ill; and 11. identify early warning symptoms of common illnesses that signal the need to get help. Meets Standard Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to 1. recognize an appropriate and safe procedure for a scientific investigation; 2. compare situations using data or sort technology by the kind of information it can provide; 3. recognize that substances may be mixtures or compounds, or sort objects in a mixture based on color, shape, or size; 4. match changes in motion with different external forces or recognize that magnets may attract or repel certain substances; 5. sort hazardous and nonhazardous exposure to heat, light, or electricity; 6. compare the life cycles of a human and a given mammal; 7. recognize basic food chains; 8. identify where parts of the circulatory system are located in the human body; and 9. match a fitness activity to a health improvement, sort healthy and unhealthy activities and diets, or match symptoms to common illnesses. Working Toward Standard Students scoring at this level may exhibit the ability to 1. recognize safety or scientific procedures or match the technology used by different types of scientists; 2. match data to a specific situation; 3. recognize that objects can have different physical properties; 4. recognize that in certain circumstances light, heat, or electricity can be hazardous; 5. recognize the life cycles of different common organisms; 6. recognize what different common animals eat; 7. recognize parts of the human circulatory system; 8. recognize fitness activities or that certain activities affect the body in different ways; and 9. recognize that the body changes during an illness. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 35: 212 ( February 2009). Chapter 20. LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 Subchapter A. Background § 2000. Sunset Provision A. Beginning academic year 2010- 2011, grade 9 LAA 2 tests will no longer be administered. B. Beginning with the academic year 2014- 2015, the LAA 2 will no longer be administered in grades 4 through 8. Students who have entered a high school cohort prior to the 2014- 2015 academic year may participate in the high school LAA 2 assessments for graduation purposes. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1- 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 37: 821 ( March 2011), amended LR 40: 2514 ( December 2014). § 2001. Introduction A. LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 ( LAA 2) is a criterion- referenced assessment, which is based on modified academic achievement standards, that allows students with persistent academic disabilities who are served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act ( IDEA) to participate in academic assessments that are sensitive to measuring progress in their learning. All content in LAA 2 was derived from the existing LEAP/ GEE assessments, and all items selected were subjected to the complete process of reviews and checks to determine appropriateness and eligibility for potential use in LAA 2. The achievement levels are aligned with the Approaching Basic and Basic achievement levels of LEAP/ GEE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1- 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 32: 239 ( February 2006), amended LR 33: 269 ( February 2007), LR 40: 2514 ( December 2014). EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 68 Subchapter B. Achievement Levels and Performance Standards § 2005. Achievement Levels A. 1. The Louisiana achievement levels are: a. basic ( meeting the standard); b. approaching basic ( approaching the standard); and c. foundational; d. pre- foundational. B. Achievement Level Definitions Approaching Basic— a student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Basic— a student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Foundational— a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling but has demonstrated the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Pre- Foundational— a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. However, the student may be developing the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 1) and ( C). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 270 ( February 2007). § 2007. Performance Standards A. Performance standards for LAA 2 English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies tests are finalized in scaled- score form. B. The scaled- score range of the approaching basic achievement level is exactly the same scale score range as with LEAP/ GEE. C. The beginning score for the basic achievement level is also exactly the same as with LEAP/ GEE. D. The top end of the basic achievement level was truncated at a scale score of 340 in all cases because the LAA 2 assessment was not designed to accurately assess students who may be emerging into the mastery achievement level. LAA 2 Achievement Levels and Scaled Score Ranges Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Grade 4 Basic 301– 340 315– 340 306- 340 301- 340 Approaching Basic 263– 300 282– 314 263- 305 272- 300 Foundational 227– 262 248– 281 224- 262 250- 271 Pre- Foundational 100– 226 100– 247 100- 223 100- 249 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Grade 5 Basic 286- 340 282- 340 Approaching Basic 247- 285 250- 281 Foundational 213- 246 215- 249 Pre- Foundational 100- 212 100- 214 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Grade 6 Basic 280- 340 281- 340 Approaching Basic 239- 279 248- 280 Foundational 177- 238 201- 247 Pre- Foundational 100- 176 100- 200 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Grade 7 Basic 286- 340 292- 340 Approaching Basic 236- 285 255- 291 Foundational 185- 235 220- 254 Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 69 dministrative Code April 2015 Pre- Foundational 100- 184 100- 219 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Grade 8 Basic 315– 340 321– 340 305- 340 297- 340 Approaching Basic 269– 314 296– 320 267- 304 263- 296 Foundational 223– 268 263– 295 222- 266 237- 262 Pre- Foundational 100– 222 100– 262 100- 221 100- 236 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Grade 9 Basic 291- 340 293- 340 Approaching Basic 219- 290 263- 292 Foundational 121- 218 221- 262 Pre- Foundational 100- 120 100- 220 Achievement Level English Language Arts Scaled Score Range Mathematics Scaled Score Range Science Scaled Score Range Social Studies Scaled Score Range Grade 10 Grade 11 Basic 299– 340 305– 340 301– 340 297– 340 Approaching Basic 270– 298 286– 304 267– 300 275– 296 Foundational 221– 269 241– 285 214– 266 241– 274 Pre- Foundational 100– 220 100– 240 100– 213 100– 240 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4 ( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Student and School Performance, LR 33: 270 ( February 2007), amended LR 33: 2350 ( November 2007), LR 34: 2553 ( December 2008), repromulgated LR 35: 57 ( January 2009). Subchapter C. Achievement Level Descriptors § 2009. Introduction A. Achievement level descriptors for Louisiana assessments were developed by committees composed of Louisiana educators who represented the subjects and grades assessed. The descriptors define what a student should know and be able to do at each achievement level for each subject assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 271 ( February 2007). § 2017. Grade 10 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 10 English Language Arts Achievement Level Descriptors Basic A student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate overall understanding of what they read and make some interpretations; 2. identify elements of text and an author's style; 3. extend ideas in text by making simple inferences and some connections to personal experiences; 4. research a topic by selecting and using information in various sources; 5. demonstrate some evidence of critical, analytical, and/ or creative thinking in response to a writing task; 6. develop a response with a central idea, evidence of some observable organization, and elaboration with some supporting details; 7. demonstrate audience awareness through a sense of personal style or voice and some variety in vocabulary and sentence structure; and 8. demonstrate some command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Approaching Basic A student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate partial understanding of what they read; 2. identify some elements of text and an author's purpose; 3. make simple or broad connections between text and personal experiences; 4. research a topic by locating information in commonly used sources; 5. demonstrate a partial response to a writing task; 6. develop a response with a weak central idea, some evidence of organization, and minimal elaboration or supporting details; 7. demonstrate limited audience awareness through use of weak personal style or voice, simple or inappropriate vocabulary, and simple sentences; and 8. demonstrate limited command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling but has demonstrated the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 70 Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate a minimal understanding of what they read; 2. identify few elements of text and an author's purpose; 3. make minimal connections between text and personal experiences; 4. research a topic by locating minimal information in commonly used sources; 5. demonstrate a minimal response to a writing task; 6. develop a response with a weak or unfocused idea, attempted organization, and little or irrelevant support; 7. demonstrate minimal audience awareness through use of weak personal style or voice, simple or inappropriate vocabulary, and simple sentences; and 8. demonstrate minimal command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Pre- Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. However, the student may be developing the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. understand what they read; 2. make at least minimal connections between text and personal experiences; 3. make minimal connections between text and personal experiences; 4. locate information within commonly used sources; 5. develop a response to a writing task using a general focus, attempted organization, and minimal support; 6. demonstrate at least minimal audience awareness through use of simple vocabulary and simple sentences; and 7. demonstrate at least minimal command of spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. B. Grade 10 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Basic A student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use estimation to verify solutions and determine the reasonableness of results as applied to routine real- world problems; 2. use algebraic and geometric reasoning strategies to solve problems; 3. recognize relationships presented in verbal, algebraic, tabular, and graphical forms; 4. demonstrate knowledge of geometric relationships and corresponding measurement skills; 5. apply statistical reasoning in the organization and display of data and in reading tables and graphs; 6. generalize from patterns and examples in the areas of algebra, geometry, and statistics; 7. use correct mathematical language and symbols to communicate mathematical relationships and reasoning processes; and 8. use calculators appropriately to solve problems. Approaching Basic A student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use estimation and measurement to verify solutions and determine the reasonableness of results as applied to routine real- world problems; 2. show limited use of fundamental algebraic, geometric, and statistical reasoning in problem solving; 3. interpret data presented in various forms; 4. show limited skills in communicating mathematically; and 5. demonstrate limited application of conceptually knowledge. Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling but has demonstrated the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. use some estimation and measurement to verify solutions and determine the reasonableness of results as applied to routine real- world problems; 2. show minimal knowledge of fundamental algebraic, geometric, and statistical reasoning in problem- solving; 3. interpret data presented in limited forms; 4. show minimal skills in communicating mathematically; and 5. demonstrate minimal or inappropriate application of conceptual knowledge. Pre- Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. However, the student may be developing the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. use some estimation and measurement to verify solutions and determine the reasonableness of results as applied to routine real- world problems; 2. show minimal knowledge of fundamental algebraic, geometric, and statistical reasoning in problem- solving; 3. interpret data presented in limited forms; 4. show minimal skills in communicating mathematically; and 5. demonstrate minimal application of conceptual knowledge. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 273 ( February 2007), amended by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 2040 ( October 2007), LR 36: 980 ( May 2010). § 2019. Grade 11 Achievement Level Descriptors A. Grade 11 Science Achievement Level Descriptors Basic A student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. formulate valid hypotheses; 2. design a simple experiment; 3. draw appropriate conclusions; 4. develop inferences from experimentation and apply that information to new situations; 5. distinguish scientific principles from pseudoscience; and 6. apply scientific principles to their everyday life. With inquiry as the core, students at the Basic level begin to identify unifying concepts and processes among the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. Approaching Basic A student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. know and understand fundamental science facts and concepts concerning the world; and 2. make observations, form a reasonable hypothesis, identify variables, interpret data, and draw conclusions. These skills should be demonstrated through the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling but has demonstrated the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 71 dministrative Code April 2015 grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate limited knowledge and understanding of fundamental science facts and concepts concerning the world; and 2. make simple observations, attempt to form a hypothesis, identify a limited number and type of variables, minimally interpret data, and draw conclusions that may be inappropriate or inaccurate. These skills should be demonstrated through the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. Pre- Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. However, the student may be developing the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate knowledge and understanding of fundamental science facts and concepts concerning the world with minimal accuracy or consistency; and 2. make simple observations, attempt to form a hypothesis, identify a limited number and type of variables, minimally interpret data, and draw conclusions. These skills should be demonstrated through the science disciplines— physical, life, earth/ space, and the environmental sciences. B. Grade 11 Social Studies Achievement Level Descriptors Basic A student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to do the following: 1. Geography: interpret geographical data, describe the basic physical structure of the planet, and explain the spatial relationships between humans and their environment. 2. Civics: explain structure and purposes of government, describe the foundations of the American political system, explain international relationships, and describe the roles of citizen. 3. Economics: describe fundamental economic concepts, explain decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government; and explain U. S. fiscal policy. 4. History: describe continuity and change, describe the significance of people, places, events, ideas, and documents, and examine relevant experiences from the past to describe contemporary issues. Approaching Basic A student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to do the following: 1. Geography: identify geographical data, recognize the physical structure of the planet, and state the spatial relationships between humans and their environment. 2. Civics: identify the structure and purposes of government, recognize the foundations of the American political system, identify international relationships, and identify the roles of citizen. 3. Economics: identify fundamental economic concepts, identify decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government; and identify U. S. fiscal and monetary policies. 4. History: recognize continuity and change, recognize the significance of people, places, events, ideas, and documents, and identify relevant experiences from the past to describe contemporary issues. Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling but has demonstrated the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to do the following: 1. Geography: identify limited geographical data, recognize a limited number of physical structures of the planet, and state a limited number of spatial relationships between humans and their environment. 2. Civics: demonstrate limited knowledge about the structure and purposes of government, demonstrate a limited understanding or recognition of the foundations of the American political system, identify a few international relationships, and identify the role of citizens with only some consistency. 3. Economics: demonstrate limited knowledge or understanding of fundamental economic concepts, identify a limited number and type of decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government; and show minimal understanding of U. S. fiscal and monetary policies. 4. History: demonstrate limited recognition of continuity and change, recognize the significance of a limited number of people, places, events, ideas and documents, and identify a limited number of relevant experiences from the past to describe contemporary issues. Pre- Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. However, the student may be developing the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to do the following: 1. Geography: identify geographical data, recognize physical structures of the planet, and state the spatial relationships between humans and their environment. 2. Civics: demonstrate knowledge about the structure and purposes of government, demonstrate an understanding or recognition of the foundations of the American political system, identify international relationships, and identify the role of citizens. 3. Economics: demonstrate knowledge or understanding of fundamental economic concepts, identify types of decisions made by consumers, businesses, and government, and show understanding of U. S. fiscal and monetary policies. 4. History: demonstrate recognition of continuity and change, recognize the significance of people, places, events, ideas, and documents, and identify relevant experiences from the past to describe contemporary issues. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 274 ( February 2007), amended by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 2041 ( October 2007), LR 36: 981 ( May 2010). Subchapter D. LAA 2 Assessment Structure § 2021. Content Standards Editor's Note: This Section has been moved from § 2019. A. The LAA 2 tests measure knowledge and skills deemed necessary for students to become good scholars and productive citizens. This knowledge and these skills are reflected in the content standards that were approved in August 2005 by the SBESE. B. The LAA 2 is based on academic content standards. Modifications in the test and item format allow students with persistent academic disabilities who are served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act ( IDEA) to participate in academic assessments that are sensitive to measuring progress in their learning. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 72 C. The LAA 2 assessments consist of fewer items than LEAP and GEE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F)( 3) and R. S. 17: 183.1- 17: 183.3. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 275 ( February 2007), amended LR 33: 2042 ( October 2007). § 2023. English Language Arts Tests Structure Editor's Note: This Section has been moved from § 2021. A. The English Language Arts tests have four sessions or subtests. 1. Writing. The Writing session requires students to produce a composition in response to a prompt. The writing session measures key aspects of English Language Arts Standards 2 and 3. a. Standard 2. Students write competently for a variety of purposes and audiences. b. Standard 3. Students communicate using standard English grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and handwriting. 2. Reading and Responding. The Reading and Responding session includes two short reading passages ( fiction, nonfiction, no poetry), four multiple- choice and one short- answer item for each passage. Questions in this session measure key aspects of English Language Arts standards 1, 6, and 7. a. Standard 1. Students read, comprehend, and respond to a range of materials, using a variety of strategies for different purposes. b. Standard 6. Students read, analyze, and respond to literature as a record of life experiences. c. Standard 7. Students apply reasoning and problem- solving skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. 3. Using Information Resources. The Using Information Resources session requires students to complete a specified task designed to measure standard 5. a. Standard 5. Students locate, select, and synthesize information from a variety of texts, media, references, and technological sources to acquire and communicate knowledge. Test items appear next to the resource needed to locate each answer. This session includes five multiple- choice items and one short answer item. 4. Proofreading. The Proofreading session requires students to identify mistakes in grammar, usage, and mechanics. The session consists of eight multiple- choice items formatted with a sentence as the stem followed by four answer choices. Questions in this session measure key aspects of English Language Arts standard 3. a. Standard 3. Students communicate using standard English grammar, usage, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and handwriting. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 275 ( February 2007), amended LR 33: 2042 ( October 2007). § 2025. Mathematics Test Structure Editor's Note: This Section has been moved from § 2023. A. The Mathematics test consists of three sessions: 1. two multiple- choice sessions; and 2. one constructed- response session. B. The Mathematics test assesses the following strands: 1. Strand N: Number and Number Relations a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the real number system and communicate the relationships within that system using a variety of techniques and tools. 2. Strand A: Algebra a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of concepts and processes that allows them to analyze, represent, and describe relationships among variable quantities and to apply algebraic methods to real- world situations. 3. Strand M: Measurement a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, processes, and real- life applications of measurement. 4. Strand G: Geometry a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of geometric concepts and applications involving one-, two-, and three- dimensional geometry, and justify their findings. 5. Strand D: Data Analysis, Probability, and Discrete Math a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students discover trends, formulate conjectures, regarding cause- and- effect relationships, and demonstrate critical- thinking skills in order to make informed decisions. 6. Strand P: Patterns, Relations, and Functions a. Standard. In problem- solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of patterns, relations, and functions that represent and explain real- world situations. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 275 ( February 2007), amended LR 33: 2042 ( October 2007). § 2027. Science Tests Structure Editor's Note: This Section has been moved from § 2025. A. The Science tests consist of two sessions. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 73 dministrative Code April 2015 1. Session 1 uses a multiple- choice test items for grade 11 to assess concepts and skills in all five strands of science. 2. Session 2 consists of two short- answer questions that assess two of the four science content strands: Physical Science, Life Science, Earth and Space Science, and Science and the Environment. These questions allow students to reflect on an idea, demonstrate their understanding of concepts and processes of science, make meaning of a given set of data, or critique the information. The wording of the questions is direct and specific, and the questions focus on the quality of the students' knowledge. B. The Science tests assess the following science strands. 1. Strand: Science as Inquiry a. Standard. Students will do science by engaging in partial and full inquiries that are within their developmental capabilities. 2. Strand: Physical Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the characteristics and interrelationships of matter and energy in the physical world. 3. Strand: Life Science a. Standard. Students will become aware of the characteristics and life cycles of organisms and understand their relationships to each other and to their environment. 4. Strand: Earth and Space Science a. Standard. Students will develop an understanding of the properties of earth materials, the structure of Earth's system, Earth's history, and Earth's place in the universe. 5. Strand: Science and the Environment a. Standard. In learning environmental science, students will develop an appreciation of the natural environment, learn the importance of environmental quality, and acquire a sense of stewardship. As consumers and citizens, they will be able to recognize how our personal, professional, and political actions affect the natural world. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24( A)( 1)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 276 ( February 2007), amended LR 33: 2043 ( October 2007). § 2029. Social Studies Tests Structure Editor's Note: This Section has been moved from § 2027. A. The Social Studies tests consist of two sessions. 1. Session 1 consists of 32 multiple- choice test items for grade 11 that assess knowledge, conceptual understanding, and application of skills in all four social studies strands ( i. e., Geography, Civics, Economics, and History). Items in Session 1 are intermingled across strands. 2. Session 2 consists of 2 open- ended questions calling for a constructed response and requiring higher- order thinking in a social studies context ( e. g., grasping a concept, analyzing information, evaluating a principle, or applying a skill). Students may be required to construct or interpret a chart, graph, map, timeline, or other graphic representation; to supply a short written answer; or to produce a short writing in response to a social studies issue or problem. Each of the constructed- response items represents one of the four social studies strands. Each task in part B is scored on a 0 to 2 point scale. B. The four social studies strands assessed are: 1. Strand G— Geography: Physical and Cultural Systems a. Standard. Students develop a spatial understanding of Earth's surface and the processes that shape it, the connection between people and places, and the relationship between man and his environment. 2. Strand C— Civics: Citizenship and Government a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of the structure and purposes of government, the foundations of the American democratic system, and the role of the United States in the world while learning about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 3. Strand E— Economics: Interdependence and Decision Making a. Standard. Students develop an understanding of fundamental economic concepts as they apply to the interdependence and decision making of individuals, households, businesses, and governments in the United States and the world. 4. Strand H— History: Time, Continuity, and Change a. Standard. Students develop a sense of historical time and historical perspective as they study the history of their community, state, nation, and world. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( A)( 1)( 2) HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR § 2031. Double Jeopardy Rule A. If a school administers a LAA 2 test that the student has already passed and the student scores below approaching basic on the retest, the passing score will be used to determine the student’s eligibility for a standard high school diploma. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 981 ( May 2010). § 2033. Rescores A. The district test coordinator must file a request with the scoring contractor within 20 working days from the date the school district receives the individual student scores. All requests must be made on or before the deadline date EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 74 identified by the testing contractor and the LDE. Requests received after the deadline will not be honored. B. Only rescores of tests from the most recent administration may be requested. C. All requests for rescoring require a fee, which is established by and paid to the scoring contractor. D. Students may request a rescore of their LAA 2 tests at specified achievement levels and scaled score ranges. If the following criterions are met, the rescore will be expedited: 1. English Language Arts and Mathematics. The test has a scaled score 10 points below the Approaching Basic achievement level. 2. Science and Social Studies. The test has a scaled score 10 points below the Approaching Basic achievement level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 981 ( May 2010). § 2035. LAA 2 High School Assessment Administration Rules A. The LAA 2 high school assessments shall only be available for students entering a high school cohort prior to the 2014- 2015 school year. Students who are transferring into a Louisiana public school district from an out- of- state school, nonpublic school, or approved home study program who meet LAA 2 Participation Criteria may participate in the LAA 2 high school assessments if they entered the ninth grade in 2013- 2014 or prior. B. Students shall take the Algebra I or Geometry EOCT to be eligible for the LAA 2 mathematics exam, the English II or English III EOCT to be eligible for the LAA 2 English Language Arts exam, the Biology EOCT for the LAA 2 Science exam, and the U. S. History EOCT for the LAA 2 Social Studies exam. C. If a district holds “ graduation” prior to the release of spring test scores, the LEA must have in place a policy for graduation without the test scores. D. There is no ending age limit for students to retest in LAA 2, nor is there a limit on the number of times the student may retake the test. Students who no longer reside in the school district where he/ she completed Carnegie units may test in the current school district of residence. The DTC shall forward the passing test scores to the high school where the Carnegie units reside. E. If a student was issued a GED diploma and subsequently meets the requirements of the LAA 2, the student may surrender the GED diploma and be issued a standard high school diploma. F. When administrative errors are made in testing, the state superintendent of education may determine how to remedy the error. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 981 ( May 2010), amended LR 40: 2514 ( December 2014). § 2037. Summer Retest Administration A. Students who were enrolled in grades 10, 11, or 12 during the spring test administration and did not score approaching basic in the required LAA 2 tests are eligible for the summer retest administration. B. Students who were enrolled in grades 10, 11, or 12 in public schools during the spring test administration but who were absent during testing are eligible for the summer retest administration. C. Students who enrolled in and attended grades 10, 11, or 12 after the spring test administration and before the close of the regular academic year are eligible for the summer retest administration. D. Students who enroll in grades 10, 11, or 12 after the close of the regular academic year but did not attend public schools during the academic year are not eligible for the summer retest administration. They must test during the fall retest administration. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 982 ( May 2010), amended LR 40: 2515 ( December 2014). § 2041. Student Membership Determination A. Student membership is determined when a student in school is identified with the following minimum required identification elements: 1. state identification number; 2. full legal name; 3. date of birth; 4. sex; 5. race; 6. district and school code; 7. entry date; and 8. grade placement. ( Adapted from Section 10, page 10.1, Student Information System User’s Guide, LDE.) B. A student must be in membership in a Louisiana public school( s) for 160 days per year or 80 days per semester in order to be eligible to receive grades AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( A). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 36: 983 ( May 2010). Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 75 dministrative Code April 2015 Chapter 21. National Assessment of Educational Progress § 2101. General Provisions A. NAEP, also known as the " Nation's Report Card," reports its results from jurisdictions around the country. NAEP uses a random stratified sample to select school districts, schools within those districts, and students within those schools. The testing window for NAEP is January through March. B. NAEP is authorized to measure and report on academic achievement by carrying out a national assessment, state assessment, and a long- term trend assessment in reading and mathematics. C. The NAEP test contractor handles all aspects of NAEP testing including distribution and collection of all test materials. The testing process involves about 60 minutes of assessment in one subject ( mathematics, science, or reading). Results are reported within six months. D. Participation in NAEP 1. In 1990, the NAEP assessments became a part of the LEAP, with state statute R. S. 17: 24.4, making participation in NAEP mandatory for Louisiana schools. Additionally, the NCLB Act mandates schools' participation. Participation in NAEP is a requirement for states and school districts receiving Title I grants. 2. District superintendents and school principals are notified of their selection for the NAEP testing process in early fall. Parents of students are then notified and asked to grant permission for the students to participate. Individual student participation is not mandatory. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1557 ( July 2005). § 2103. Inclusions and Accommodations A. The NAEP assessment includes students with disabilities and limited English proficient students. B. Schools may exclude students with disabilities according to the following NAEP designed criteria: 1. the student's IEP team determines that the student cannot participate; 2. the student's cognitive functioning is so severely impaired that she or he cannot participate; or 3. the student's IEP requires that the student be tested with an accommodation or adaptation that NAEP does not allow. C. Accommodations 1. Students who need accommodations receive such aids as: a. extra testing time; b. individual or small group administration; c. large- print booklets; d. multiple testing sessions. 2. Accommodations do not include reading passages or questions aloud for the reading assessment. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( A) ( 1). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1557 ( July 2005). Chapter 22. ACT Program § 2201. Background A. The American College Testing ( ACT) Program also known as ACT’s College and Career Readiness System provides a longitudinal approach to educational and career planning through student assessment, curriculum support, and school improvement. This research- approach based solution helps schools, districts, and states improve academic measurement, student readiness, and instructional designs. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 77 ( January 2013). § 2203. EXPLORE A. Designed to help 8th and 9th graders explore a broad range of options for their future, EXPLORE is a curriculum- based educational and career planning program that measures achievement in English, math, reading, and science. As an early indicator of college readiness, EXPLORE gives educators the means to structure high school planning and career exploration for students and parents. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 77 ( January 2013). § 2205. PLAN A. PLAN helps 10th graders build a solid foundation for future academic and career success. PLAN is a curriculum- based educational and career planning program that measures achievement in English, math, reading, and science. PLAN is designed to help 10th graders build rigorous high school course plans and identify areas of academic need so they can stay on track for college and work success. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 77 ( January 2013). EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 76 § 2207. ACT A. The ACT is designed to assess 11th graders’ general learning outcomes. The ACT is a curriculum- based educational and career planning tool that assesses mastery of state and college readiness standards. Accepted by all four- year colleges and universities, it is the college entrance test most preferred nationwide. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 77 ( January 2013). § 2209. WorkKeys A. The ACT WorkKeys assessment for 11th grade students in the Jump Start program assesses the academic and career skills that are needed to be successful in the workplace. It assists in identifying educational pathways that can further develop the proficiencies that are critical to job success. WorkKeys matches student skills to job profiles in order to support students in developing successful career pathways. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 40: 1320 ( July 2014). Chapter 23. English Language Development Assessment ( ELDA) Subchapter A. Background § 2301. Overview A. The NCLB of 2002 Title III ( 20 USCS § 6301 et seq.) requires standards- based assessment of the progress of all LEP students enrolled in grades kindergarten through 12 in attaining English proficiency, including a student's level of comprehension, speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in English. ELDA grade cluster 3- 12 was field- tested in spring 2004 and implemented during spring 2005. Grade cluster K- 2 was field tested in spring 2005. Full implementation of ELDA in kindergarten through 12 occurred in spring 2006. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1557 ( July 2005), amended LR 33: 259 ( February 2007). Subchapter B. General Provisions § 2303. Introduction A. ELDA is composed of tests in four grade clusters ( Kindergarten- 2, 3- 5, 6- 8, 9- 12) in the four language domains ( reading, writing, listening, and speaking). It assesses both the academic and school/ social environment language of students. ELDA is vertically linked across grade clusters and has five levels of proficiency descriptors ranging from level 1, which has a realistic definition of English proficiency for beginners, to level 5, which has a rigorous definition of full English proficiency. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 259 ( February 2007). Subchapter C. ELDA Test Design § 2305. Format A. ELDA test design consists of: 1. Inventory. Observation in grade levels K- 2; 2. Multiple choice items ( MC). Grade levels 3- 12; 3. Short Constructed Responses ( SCR). Grade levels 3- 12; 4. Extended Constructed Responses ( ECR). Grade levels 3- 12; 5. Speaking Constructed Responses ( CR)— grade levels 3- 12. Listening Speaking Reading Writing K Inventory: 7 specified tasks Inventory: 8 specified tasks Inventory: 14 specified tasks Inventory: 9 performance activities 1- 2 Inventory: 7 specified tasks Inventory: 8 specified tasks Inventory: 14 specified tasks Inventory: 9 performance activities 3- 5 50 MC 16 CR 50 MC 3 SCR 1 ECR 15 MC 6- 8 50 MC 16 CR 50 MC 3 SCR 1 ECR 15 MC 9- 12 50 M 16 CR 60 Multiple Choice 4 SCR 1 ECR 15 MC AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 259 ( February 2007), amended LR 34: 2556 ( December 2008), repromulgated LR 35: 61 ( January 2009). Subchapter D. Target Population § 2307. Participation Criteria A. Limited English Proficient students. A student who is aged 3 through 21; who is enrolled in an English- speaking elementary school or secondary school for less than a year; who was not born in the United States or whose native language is a language other than English; who is a Native American or Alaska Native or a native resident of the outlying areas and comes from an environment where a language other than English has had significant impact on his level of English language proficiency; or who is migratory, whose native language is a language other than English, and who comes from an environment where a language other than English is dominant; and whose Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 77 dministrative Code April 2015 difficulties in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language may be sufficient to deny them: 1. the ability to meet the state's proficient level of achievement on state assessments; 2. the ability to successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English; or 3. the opportunity to participate fully in society. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 259 ( February 2007). Subchapter E. Proficiency Levels and Proficiency Standards § 2309. Proficiency Levels A. 1. The English Language Development Standards ( ELDS) levels are: a. Level 1, Beginning Proficiency; b. Level 2, Lower Intermediate Proficiency; c. Level 3, Upper Intermediate Proficiency; d. Level 4, Advanced Proficiency; and e. Level 5, Full English Proficiency. 2. The name of the proficiency levels align with ELDS. The definition of each level is also consistent with the definitions of ELDS. B. Proficiency Level Definitions 1. Listening Proficiency Levels Level I, Beginning Proficiency— a student at this level is beginning to understand short utterances. Level II, Lower Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level understands simple statements, directions, and questions. Level III, Upper Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level understands standard speech delivered in most settings. Level IV, Advanced Proficiency— a student at this level can identify main ideas and relevant details of discussions or presentations on a wide range of topics. Level V, Full English Proficiency— a student at this level can understand and identify main idea( s) and relevant details of extended discussions or presentations on a wide range of familiar and unfamiliar topics. 2. Speaking Proficiency Levels Level I, Beginning Proficiency— a student at this level is beginning to use gestures and simple words to communicate. Level II, Lower Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level can use appropriate strategies to initiate and respond to simple conversation. Level III, Upper Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level can communicate orally with some hesitation. Level IV, Advanced Proficiency— a student at this level can actively engage in most communicative situations familiar and unfamiliar. Level V, Full English Proficiency— a student at this level is fluent and accurate in language production. 3. Reading Proficiency Levels Level I, Beginning Proficiency— a student at this level is beginning to understand simple printed material. Level II, Lower Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level can understand the general message of basic reading passages. Level III, Upper Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level can understand descriptive materials within familiar contexts and some complex narratives. Level IV, Advanced Proficiency— a student at this level can understand the context of most text in the academic areas with support. Level V, Full English Proficiency— a student at this level can use reading strategies the same as their native English- speaking peers to derive meaning from a wide range of both social and academic texts. 4. Writing Proficiency Levels Level I, Beginning Proficiency— a student at this level is beginning to develop communicative writing skills. Level II, Lower Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level can compose short informative passages on very familiar topics. Level III, Upper Intermediate Proficiency— a student at this level can write simple texts and short reports. Level IV, Advanced Proficiency— a student at this level can write multi- paragraph essays, journal entries, personal/ business letters, and creative texts in an organized fashion with some errors. Level V, Full English Proficiency— a student at this level can write fluently using language structures, technical vocabulary, and appropriate writing conventions with some circumlocutions ( wordy or indirect language). AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 259 ( February 2007). § 2311. Proficiency Standards A. Proficiency standards for ELDA listening, speaking, reading, and writing tests are finalized in scaled- score form. The scaled- score ranges vary per grade cluster. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 78 ELDA Proficiency Level Scaled- Score Ranges Domain Proficiency Level 1 Proficiency Level 2 Proficiency Level 3 Proficiency Level 4 Proficiency Level 5 Kindergarten Listening 50– 99 100– 130 131– 170 171– 191 192– 230 Speaking 40– 99 100– 130 131– 166 167– 196 197– 230 Reading 30– 99 100– 127 128– 164 165– 184 185– 240 Writing 30– 99 100– 135 136– 156 157– 192 193– 220 Grade Cluster 1– 2 Listening 50– 114 115– 145 146– 178 179– 199 200– 230 Speaking 40– 112 113– 135 136– 170 171– 199 200– 230 Reading 30– 107 108– 141 142– 167 168– 199 200– 240 Writing 30– 94 95– 138 139– 159 160– 199 200– 220 Grade Cluster 3– 5 Listening 100– 449 450– 543 547– 644 645– 724 725– 930 Speaking 117– 449 450– 546 547– 667 668– 808 809– 937 Reading 100– 449 450– 579 580– 647 648– 769 770– 931 Writing 127– 449 450– 576 577– 668 669- 844 845- 950 Grade Cluster 6– 8 Listening 115– 553 554– 625 626– 717 718– 805 806– 941 Speaking 133– 457 458– 610 611– 718 719– 824 825– 936 Reading 103– 459 460– 611 612– 690 691– 828 829– 940 Writing 149– 552 553– 652 653– 721 722– 896 897– 928 Grade Cluster 9– 12 Listening 118– 555 556– 631 632– 728 729– 849 850– 950 Speaking 192– 569 570– 649 650– 764 765– 849 850– 950 Reading 122– 544 545– 629 630– 717 718– 849 850– 933 Writing 122– 508 509– 630 631– 718 719– 849 850– 932 Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 79 dministrative Code April 2015 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 260 ( February 2007), amended LR 34: 2556 ( December 2008), repromulgated LR 35: 61 ( January 2009). Subchapter F. ELDA Proficiency Level Descriptors § 2313. Introduction A. Proficiency level descriptors for ELDA assessments were developed by English Language Learners ( ELL) teachers from across the Limited English Proficient State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards ( LEP SCASS) states. The descriptors define what a student should know and be able to do at each proficiency level for each domain assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 261 ( February 2007). § 2315. Proficiency Level Descriptors A. Listening Proficiency Level Descriptors Listening 5 Students at this stage can understand a wide range of both social and academic texts available to native English speakers. 4 Students at this stage can understand the content of most texts of interest to them and, with support, most academic content areas. 3 Students at this stage can understand short conversations on topics in everyday situations, with peers, and selected adults, either in face- to- face situations or on the telephone. 2 Students at this stage can understand simple statements, directions, and questions. Frequently request repetition and/ or circumlocutions ( wordy or indirect language). 1 Students at this stage have problems understanding even short utterances. May occasionally understand isolated words, such as cognates, borrowed words, or high- frequency social conventions. B. Speaking Proficiency Level Descriptors Speaking 5 Students at this stage can engage in most social communication situations with confidence and mastery of complex language structures. Communication in academic areas is characterized by fluent and accurate language production with some circumlocution regarding technical vocabulary. 4 Students at this stage can handle most communicative situations with confidence but may need help with any difficulty that may arise in language production, especially in academic areas. 3 Students at this stage can initiate and sustain a conversation in face- to- face situations or on the telephone, with fluent speakers, often with hesitation and circumlocution regarding low- frequency vocabulary. 2 Students at this stage can use appropriate strategies to initiate and respond to simple statements and engage in simple face- to- face conversations with more fluent speakers of the same age group. 1 Students at this stage have no functional communicative speaking skills. May communicate with high- frequency learned words or phrases. C. Reading Proficiency Level Descriptors Reading 5 Students at this stage can understand a wide range of both social and academic texts available to native English speakers. 4 Students at this stage can understand the content of most texts of interest to them and, with support, most academic content areas. 3 Students at this stage can understand more complex narrative and descriptive materials within a familiar context. 2 Students at this stage can understand simple material for informative or social purposes. 1 Students at this stage have problems understanding even the simplest of material. May occasionally be able to identify isolated words and/ or phrases when strongly supported by context. D. Writing Proficiency Level Descriptors Writing 5 Students at this stage are mostly able to produce fluent academic writing using language structures, technical vocabulary, and appropriate writing conventions with some circumlocutions. 4 Students at this stage can write multi- paragraph essays, journal entries, personal and business letters, and creative texts in an organized fashion but with some errors. 3 Students at this stage can write simple texts, personal and business letters, and short reports using high- frequency language. 2 Students at this stage can describe basic personal needs and compose short information passages and texts on very familiar topics. 1 Students at this stage have no practical communicative writing skills. May be able to form some individual letters or transcribe familiar words or phrases. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 261 ( February 2007). Subchapter G. ELDA Assessment Structure § 2317. Listening Domain Structure A. Kindergarten– Grade 2 1. Inventory with specified tasks to be performed by the student. B. Grades 3- 12 1. The listening assessment has several steps: a. Scripted Administration Directions. Students will be read a scripted set of directions by the test administrator. b. Recorded Prompting. Students will complete the test using a prerecorded audiocassette or CD. i. A narrator reads stimulus materials, questions, and possible responses to the student. ii. Stimulus material is read two times during the narration. iii. Questions are read one time only. iv. Students have 10 seconds to respond, in their answer document, to each question after the narrator has read the last option. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 80 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 261 ( February 2007). § 2319. Speaking Domain Structure A. Kindergarten- 2 1. Inventory with activities to be completed by the student. B. Grades 3- 12 1. The speaking assessment has seven sections that require a student to exhibit comprehension skills responding to prerecorded prompts. a. Practice Task 1 b. Practice Task 2 c. School— Social Interaction Tasks d. English— Language Arts Task e. Mathematics, Science, and Technology Tasks f. Social Studies Tasks g. Closing 2. The teacher scores individual student's responses to each prompt using the scoring rubrics. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 261 ( February 2007). § 2321. Reading Domain Structure A. Kindergarten- 2 1. Inventory with specified tasks to be performed by each student. B. Grades 3- 12 1. The reading tests are divided into three parts. a. Short Passages. This section tests the student's ability to understand information in short reading passages. One or more multiple- choice questions are asked about each passage. b. Instructions. This section tests the student's ability to understand directions. There is a different set of instructions for each question. The student will need to identify which person followed the directions correctly. c. Longer Passages. This section tests the student's ability to understand information in longer reading passages. The student will answer several questions about each passage. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 262 ( February 2007). § 2323. Writing Domain Structure A. Kindergarten- 2 1. Inventory with specified tasks to be performed by the student. B. Grades 3- 12 1. The writing assessment is divided into three parts. a. Open Ended. Students will write responses to prompts. b. Revise and Edit. Students will choose the best answer to multiple choice questions, correct grammar and usage errors in passages. c. Graphic Organizers. Students will answer multiple- choice questions about graphic organizers. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with 20 USCS, Section 6311. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 262 ( February 2007). Chapter 24. Academic Skills Assessment ( ASA) Subchapter A. Background § 2400. Sunset Provision A. For the academic year 2011- 2012, ASA and ASA LAA2 tests will be administered one- time only and thereafter discontinued as a statewide assessment. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7 and 17: 24( F)( 2). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 77 ( January 2013). § 2401. Description A. A statewide assessment program developed for students pursuing a state- approved skills certificate ( SASC) or GED. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 38: 36 ( January 2012). Subchapter B. General Provisions § 2403. Introduction A. ASA will be administered to students pursuing a state- approved skills certificate ( SASC) or GED. B. ASA or ASA LAA 2 will be administered to students with disabilities identified under IDEA who meet LAA 2 participation criteria. C. ASA or ASA LAA 2 will be administered in the first and second year of program ( SASC or GED): Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 81 dministrative Code April 2015 1. in year one, the students will take ASA Mathematics; and 2. in year two, the students will take ASA English language arts. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 38: 36 ( January 2012). Subchapter C. ASA Test Design § 2405. Format A. English language arts. B. Mathematics. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 38: 37 ( January 2012). Subchapter D. Target Population § 2407. Membership A. Students pursuing a state- approved skills certificate ( SASC or GED). B. Remaining students presently enrolled in the Options ( PreGED/ Skills) Program for 2011- 2012 only. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 38: 37 ( January 2012). § 2409. Achievement Levels A. 1. Louisiana achievement levels are: a. basic ( meeting the standard); b. approaching basic ( approaching the standard); c. unsatisfactory; d. foundational; e. pre- foundational. B. Achievement Level Definitions 1. Basic— a student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 2. Approaching Basic— a student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. 3. Foundational— a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling but has demonstrated the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. 4. Pre- Foundational— a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. However, the student may be developing the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. 5. Unsatisfactory— a student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 1) and ( C). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 78 ( January 2013). § 2411. Performance Standards A. Performance standards for ASA English Language Arts and Mathematics are finalized in scaled- score form. B. ASA Mathematics Achievement Levels and Scaled Score Ranges ( field tested, but not implemented) Achievement Level Mathematics Basic 293 – 359 Approaching Basic 263 – 292 Unsatisfactory 100 – 262 C. ASA LAA 2 Mathematics Achievement Levels and Scaled Score Ranges Achievement Level Mathematics Basic 293 – 340 Approaching Basic 263 – 292 Foundational 221 – 262 Pre- Foundational 100 – 220 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 78 ( January 2013). Subchapter F. Achievement Level Descriptors § 2412. Introduction A. Achievement level descriptors for Louisiana assessments were developed by committees composed of Louisiana educators who represented the subjects and grades assessed. The descriptors define what a student should know and be able to do at each achievement level for each subject assessed at a given grade level. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 391.4( B). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 78 ( January 2013). EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 82 § 2413. ASA Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Basic A student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. Simplify numerical expressions involving multiple operations, using order of operations; 2. represent numbers as exponential expressions with positive, integral exponents; 3. use proportional reasoning to solve real- life problems; 4. use algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities to describe tables and verbal statements in real- life situations; 5. solve multi- step equations and inequalities in one variable; 6. choose appropriate common units ( U. S. and metric) to make measurements; 7. demonstrate understanding of precision and accuracy; 8. solve simple problems involving indirect measurement in real- life situations; 9. recognize and graph linear equations to interpret and solve real- life problems, and use appropriate terminology to describe slope, intercept, point, intersection, etc.; 10. draw translations and line reflections in a coordinate system; 11. read, organize, construct, and interpret data presented in a variety of formats and make generalizations using these representations; and 12. demonstrate a fundamental understanding of graphical representations of functions, including the relationship of the constants and coefficients in a linear function to the graph of the function. Approaching Basic A student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate understanding of different number systems, including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers; 2. perform basic operations with positive rational numbers; 3. determine whether problems require exact or approximate solutions; 4. recognize ratios and proportions that describe real- life situations; 5. use calculators to evaluate polynomials for given values of the variables; 6. solve single- step equations and inequalities in one variable; 7. estimate, calculate, and make measurements using common units of measure; 8. locate points on a coordinate grid; 9. recognize geometric transformations on a coordinate grid; 10. match data displays to real- life situations, and vice versa; 11. follow and interpret processes expressed in flow charts; and 12. recognize and describe coordinate graphs of functions. Unsatisfactory A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate understanding of different number systems, including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers; 2. perform basic operations with positive rational numbers; 3. determine whether problems require exact or approximate solutions; 4. recognize ratios and proportions that describe real- life situations; 5. use calculators to evaluate polynomials for given values of the variables; 6. solve single- step equations and inequalities in one variable; 7. estimate, calculate, and make measurements using common units of measure; 8. locate points on a coordinate grid; 9. recognize geometric transformations on a coordinate grid; 10. match data displays to real- life situations, and vice versa; 11. follow and interpret processes expressed in flow charts; and 12. recognize and describe coordinate graphs of functions. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 78 ( January 2013). § 2415. ASA LAA 2 Mathematics Achievement Level Descriptors Basic A student at this level has demonstrated only the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. simplify numerical expressions involving multiple operations, using order of operations; 2. represent numbers as exponential expressions with positive, integral exponents; 3. use proportional reasoning to solve real- life problems; 4. use algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities to describe tables and verbal statements in real- life situations; 5. solve multi- step equations and inequalities in one variable; 6. choose appropriate common units ( U. S. and metric) to make measurements; 7. demonstrate understanding of precision and accuracy; 8. solve simple problems involving indirect measurement in real- life situations; 9. recognize and graph linear equations to interpret and solve real- life problems, and use appropriate terminology to describe slope, intercept, point, intersection, etc.; 10. draw translational and line reflections in a coordinate system; 11. read, organize, construct, and interpret data presented in a variety of formats and make generalizations using these representations; and 12. demonstrate a fundamental understanding of graphical representations of functions. Approaching Basic A student at this level has only partially demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate understanding of different number systems, including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers; 2. perform basic operations with positive rational numbers; 3. determine whether problems require exact or approximate solutions; 4. recognize ratios and proportions that describe real- life situations; 5. use calculators to evaluate polynomials for given values of the variables; 6. solve single- step equations and inequalities in one variable; 7. estimate, calculate, and make measurements using common units of measure; 8. locate points on a coordinate grid; 9. recognize geometric transformations on a coordinate grid; 10. match data displays to real- life situations, and vice versa; 11. follow and interpret processes expressed in flow charts; and 12. recognize and describe coordinate graphs of functions. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 83 dministrative Code April 2015 Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling but has demonstrated the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level generally exhibit the ability to: 1. demonstrate some understanding of different number systems, including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers; 2. perform a few basic operations with positive rational numbers; 3. determine— with some consistency— whether problems require exact or approximate solutions; 4. recognize some ratios and proportions that describe real- life situations; 5. minimally use calculators to evaluate polynomials for given values of the variables; 6. solve some single- step equations and inequalities in one variable; 7. estimate, calculate, and make measurements— with a limited degree of accuracy— using common units of measure; 8. show limited skills in locating points on a coordinate grid; 9. recognize a limited number of geometric transformations on a coordinate grid; 10. match some data displays to real- life situations, and vice versa; 11. follow and interpret some processes expressed in flow charts; and 12. minimally recognize and describe coordinate graphs of functions. Pre- Foundational A student at this level has not demonstrated the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for the next level of schooling. However, the student may be developing the foundational knowledge and skills that can be built upon to access the grade- level curriculum. Students scoring at this level need to develop the ability to: 1. demonstrate at least some understanding of different number systems, including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers; 2. perform at least a few basic operations with positive rational numbers; 3. determine— with at least some consistency— whether problems require exact or approximate solutions; 4. recognize at least some ratios and proportions that describe real- life situations; 5. at least minimally use calculators to evaluate polynomials for given values of the variables; 6. solve at least some single- step equations and inequalities in one variable; 7. estimate, calculate, and make measurements— with at least a limited degree of accuracy— using common units of measure; 8. show at least limited skills in locating points on a coordinate grid; 9. recognize at least a limited number of geometric transformations on a coordinate grid; 10. match at least some data displays to real- life situations; and vice versa; 11. follow and interpret at least some processes expressed in flow charts; and 12. at least minimally recognize and describe coordinate graphs of function. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 39: 79 ( January 2013). Chapter 25. Field Testing § 2501. General Provisions A. The purpose of field testing is to obtain data on test items that have been developed for a particular assessment. In Louisiana, test items are developed and field tests conducted for the following assessments: 1. Louisiana Educational Assessment Program ( LEAP); 2. Integrated LEAP ( iLEAP); 3. End- of- Course Tests ( EOCT). B. LEAP field tests are conducted annually in designated content areas. C. Participation 1. Schools selected for any of the Louisiana field tests must participate. This ensures the test data are representative of the state's student population for the grade level being assessed. 2. Selection of schools for the field test is based on several demographic factors. The sampling plan includes the following criteria: a. sample from every school district; b. to the extent possible, schools shall be selected that are representative of the schools in the state in: i. academic achievement level; ii. percent of minorities; iii. percent of students receiving free/ reduced lunch; iv. percent of students classified as special education; v. LEP, and Section 504, and school size; c. select no schools with fewer than 10 students; d. generally select no schools that are participating in NAEP; e. select no private schools; f. in general, any given school should only: i. participate in one grade; ii. administer one content area; iii. administer only one test form. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1557 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 239 ( February 2006), LR 34: 1353 ( July 2008), LR 40: 2515 ( December 2014). § 2503. Field Test Administration A. The same test security procedures and test administration rules used for operational ( regular) testing apply to field tests. District and school personnel must adhere to the test security policy and to all directions in the field test administration manuals. Schools will be monitored to ensure that administrative and security procedures are followed. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1558 ( July 2005). EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 84 Chapter 27. Placement Tests § 2701. Administration and Scoring A. Placement tests for fourth grade and eighth grade public school students are shipped to district test coordinators in late July and are to be returned to the testing contractor after February 15 each year. B. Students who participate in the spring and/ or summer administration of LEAP test and fail to score at the required achievement level( s) are not eligible to take The Iowa Tests for placement purposes. C. Charter schools and laboratory schools must secure placement tests from the testing contractor. These schools call the contractor directly and order placement tests for incoming students between July and February. D. District test coordinators score the placement tests for students taking the tests in the public school districts. The LDE, Division of Assessments and Accountability, scores all placement tests administered by charter schools and laboratory schools. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24 et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1558 ( July 2005), amended LR 35: 220 ( February 2009). § 2703. Security A. Testing masks and all testing materials must be kept in a designated locked and secure area. B. All secure test materials are to be handled in accordance with the SBESE Test Security Policy. C. District test coordinators and test administrators are required to sign a security agreement prior to test administration. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1558 ( July 2005). Chapter 29. Graduation Exit Examination (" Old" GEE) § 2901. General Provisions A. The " Old" GEE measures curricula- based proficiencies in language arts, mathematics, written composition, science, and social studies. The first statewide administration of the GEE was in the spring of 1989, and the last statewide administration was in the summer of 2003. The testing program then became the responsibility of the school districts, with the tests to be administered by the district test coordinators. B. District test coordinators have received from the LDE a CD containing the tests, answer folders, scoring keys, and conversion tables. Copies of braille and large- print tests may be requested from the LDE, Division of Student Standards and Assessments, Assessment Administration Section. C. The GEE tests are to be administered by the district test coordinators each year in October and April, as indicated on the official statewide testing schedule, to former high school students who have earned Carnegie units but still need to pass the GEE to earn a high school diploma. Students are required to take only those parts of the GEE in which they did not attain the required performance standards. D. All students who were enrolled in tenth grade during the spring of 1989 through the spring of 2000 can be administered the test twice a year. There is no age limit for students who request a retest with GEE, nor is there a limit on the number of times the student may retake the test. E. If the student was issued a GED and later passes the GEE, the student may surrender the GED diploma and be issued a standard high school diploma. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( 4) ( a) and R. S. 17.7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1558 ( July 2005), amended LR 40: 2515 ( December 2014). § 2903. Performance Standards A. Performance standards for the GEE Language Arts, Mathematics, Written Composition, Science, and Social Studies tests are finalized in scaled- score form. Performance Standard Scaled Score Range Language Arts Mathematics Written Composition Science Social Studies 1053 1048 1047 1042 1041 1000– 1097 1000– 1097 1018– 1072 1000– 1093 1000– 1093 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( 4) ( a) and R. S. 17.7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1558 ( July 2005). § 2905. Transfer Students A. These rules apply to students who were enrolled as sophomores during the 1988- 1989 through 1999- 2000 academic years. 1. Requirements for students who have never been in membership in a Louisiana public school and are transferring from out- of- state, from Louisiana nonpublic schools, or from an approved home study program are as follows. a. A student who entered the ninth grade during the 1987- 1988 school year and thereafter, and who transferred to a Louisiana public school at or below the ninth grade shall take and pass all parts of the GEE. b. A student who entered ninth grade in 1987- 1988 and thereafter, and who is classified by the local school district as a tenth grader shall take and pass all parts of the GEE. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 85 dministrative Code April 2015 c. A student who entered ninth grade in 1987- 1988 and thereafter and who is classified by the local school district as an eleventh grader shall take and pass the science and social studies parts of the GEE. d. A student who entered ninth grade in 1987- 1988 and thereafter and who is classified by the local school district as a twelfth grader shall not be required to take any part of the GEE. 2. Requirements for students who were in membership in a Louisiana public school( s), transferred out, and subsequently returned are as follows. a. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a student in grades kindergarten through 6 and who transferred out and subsequently returned shall adhere to the following policy. i. A student who returns in the seventh and/ or eighth grade for a period in membership of 160 days total shall take and pass all parts of GEE. ii. A student who returns in the ninth grade shall be required to take and pass all parts of the GEE. iii. A student who returns and is classified as a tenth grader shall be required to take and pass all parts of the GEE. iv. A student who returns and is classified as an eleventh grader shall be required to take and pass the science and social studies parts of the GEE. v. A student who returns and is classified as a twelfth grader shall not be required to take any part of the GEE. b. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools in the seventh and/ or eighth grades for a period of 160 days total and who then transferred out and subsequently returned at any grade level shall take and pass all parts of the GEE. c. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a ninth grader and who then transferred out and subsequently returned at any grade level, shall be required to take and pass all parts of the GEE. d. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a tenth grader and who then transferred out and subsequently returned at any grade level shall take and pass all parts of the GEE. e. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as an eleventh grader and who then transferred out and subsequently returned at the eleventh or twelfth grade level shall take and pass the science and social studies parts of the GEE. f. A student who was in initial membership in Louisiana public schools as a twelfth grader and who then transferred out and subsequently returned as a twelfth grader shall not be required to take any part of the GEE. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.24.4 and R. S. 17.7. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1559 ( July 2005). § 2907. Student Membership Determination A. Student membership is determined when a student in school is identified with the following minimum required identification elements: 1. state identification number; 2. full legal name; 3. date of birth; 4. sex; 5. race; 6. school district and school code; 7. entry date; and 8. grade placement. ( Adapted from Section 10, page 10.1, Student Information System User's Guide, LDE.) B. A student must be in membership in a Louisiana public school( s) for 160 days per year or 80 days per semester in order to be eligible to receive grades ( 1103G, Bulletin 741, LDE). AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.24. et seq. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1559 ( July 2005). Chapter 31. Louisiana Alternate Assessment- B § 3101. Special Education Needs A. To accommodate the needs of Louisiana students in special education, the SBESE mandated that the Louisiana Statewide Norm- Referenced Testing Program ( LSNRTP) provide the Louisiana Alternate Assessment- B ( LAA- B) testing component, referred to as " out- of- level," beginning in spring 2000. Spring 2003 was the fourth and final year of the LAA- B testing program. B. The program provided data for evaluating student, school, and district performance. Teachers and administrators could use test results to plan instructional programs. C. Students enrolled in grades 3 through 8 who met specific criteria for LAA- B took the Complete Battery of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills at the appropriate level( s). LAA- B students in grade 9 or in the Options ( PreGED/ Skills) Program took either the Complete Battery of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills or the Complete Battery of the Iowa Tests of Educational Development at their functioning grade levels in reading, language, and/ or mathematics. Some students may have taken both the ITBS and the ITED. D. The LAA- B is no longer administered in Louisiana. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 86 AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4 ( F) ( 3). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1559 ( July 2005). Chapter 33. Assessment of Special Populations § 3301. Participation A. The following classifications of special populations students must be tested in statewide assessments: 1. special education students; 2. students with one or more disabilities according to Section 504; and 3. LEP students. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 1945 HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1560 ( July 2005). § 3303. Special Education Students A. All special education students must participate in statewide assessments. Students are to take the test that corresponds to the grade in which they are enrolled. Special education students who meet specific participation criteria as stated in Bulletin 1530 Louisiana IEP Handbook for Students with Disabilities and whose Individualized Education Plans ( IEPs) indicate they will participate in an alternate assessment may participate in the LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 ( LAA 1). The assessment in which the student is to participate and any accommodations the student is to receive for instruction and assessment must be documented annually on the program/ services page of the student’s IEP. Test accommodations cannot be different from or in addition to the accommodations indicated on the student’s IEP and provided in regular classroom instruction and assessment. 1. Individualized Education Plan. According to the 2004 amendments to the Individual with Disabilities Education Act ( IDEA), accommodations are provided in regular classroom instruction based on a student’s needs and are documented in the student’s IEP. 2. New accommodations or changes to an accommodation for a statewide assessment shall, to the extent practicable, be recorded on a student’s IEP form 30 days prior to the start of testing. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 1945. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1560 ( July 2005), amended by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 32: 239 ( February 2006), LR 36: 983 ( May 2010), LR 38: 37 ( January 2012), LR 40: 2515 ( December 2014). § 3305. Students with One or More Disabilities According to Section 504 A. All students with one or more disabilities according to Section 504 are to be tested. Test accommodations are permitted for these students provided they are used in the students' regular classroom instruction and assessment and provided the other conditions specified in the Administrative Guidelines for Students with Disabilities According to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 are met. An IAP must not be developed solely for the provision of accommodations on statewide assessments. 1. The LDE defines a student with one or more disabilities according to Section 504 as derived from the regulations for Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. B. Conditions for Eligibility for Test Accommodations as a Section 504 Student 1. The student has a disability that has been identified by a group of knowledgeable individuals whose credentials are appropriate to the disability and the disability is recognized by the Section 504 committee as being consistent with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 2. The student must undergo an annual review by the Section 504 Committee and an Individual Accommodation Plan ( IAP) must be completed for each newly identified student or for each student whose accommodations have changed since his or her last test administration. a. The IAP identifies students with disabilities as defined by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the ADA. The form also must be used to document accommodations for qualified Section 504 students. School districts are responsible for completing the form once a student's eligibility has been determined. b. Signatures. Duplicate signatures are not acceptable on the IAP. Signature lines with an asterisk must be original signatures. The parent and student signatures are optional, but it is considered best practice to obtain these. The district Section 504 coordinator's signature is required only if the student will require accommodations on statewide assessment. c. The completed form must be submitted with a copy of the student's IAP to the district Section 504 coordinator by the date designated by the district. 3. The student has had accommodations routinely provided as part of his or her ongoing classroom instruction and assessment, as recommended by the Section 504 Committee and as documented on the student's IAP. 4. New accommodations or changes to an accommodation for a statewide assessment must be on the student IAP form 30 days prior to the start of testing. 5. Documentation for how the student meets the definition of substantially limited in Section 1630.2 of the Americans with Disabilities Act ( ADA) of 1990 must be on file at the school. Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 87 dministrative Code April 2015 C. Documentation. Documentation with evaluation results from the School Building Level Committee ( SBLC) and/ or the Section 504 team must be kept on file and be available to the LEAP Data Validation Committee upon request. Documentation/ evaluation samples may include: 1. a summary of the doctor's report or diagnosis; 2. informal assessments and teacher observations; 3. curriculum- based assessments; 4. formal assessments such as: a. WRAT- 3; b. Slosson; c. Brigance; d. OWLS; e. TOLD- 3; f. KBIT; g. GORT- 3; h. KTEA( Brief); i. Test of Reading Comprehension- 3; j. DRA; k. TOWL- 3 Test of Problem Solving; and l. PIAT. D. Individualized Healthcare Plans. If a Section 504 student requires medical procedures that will prevent him or her from participating in a statewide assessment, individualized healthcare plans must be attached to the IAP. E. Forms Management 1. Submission. A LEAP Data Validation form must be completed and submitted, along with a copy of the student's IAP, to the district Section 504 coordinator by the district- designated date. The district Section 504 coordinator should establish the deadline for collection of the forms early enough to ensure time for review before submitting them to the LDE. School districts should contact the district Section 504 coordinator regarding the deadline. The LEAP Data Validation forms should be submitted to the LDE annually. 2. Review. The IAPs will be reviewed by a committee of LDE employees and Section 504 Statewide Task Force members for any possible testing irregularities, including potential violations of test security; appropriateness; and required information that substantiates the accommodations provided during assessment. Reviews will be scheduled throughout the month of January, to be completed by January 30. district Section 504 coordinators will be notified concerning the place and time of review for their districts. 3. Extenuating Circumstances. The extenuating circumstances that will be considered for reviewing an IAP submitted after the deadline and/ or after the established review period are: a. a student is in the process of transferring from state to state or parish to parish; b. a student has a temporary illness or injury that is substantially limiting and will prevent him or her from having an equal opportunity on and access to statewide assessments. F. Gifted or Talented Students with a Qualified Disability. For students who are classified as gifted or talented students and who have a qualified disability under Section 504, a Section 504 IAP must be attached to the student's IEP. G. LEAP Summer Retest and GEE Summer, Fall, and February Seniors Only Retest. Students who were identified as Section 504 or who had accommodations added to their Section 504 IAP after the spring assessment must have a LEAP Data Validation form completed and submitted to LDE 30 days before the summer or fall retest. A copy of the IAP must be forwarded to the student's summer remediation and summer or fall testing site to ensure the student receives the appropriate accommodations for instruction and assessment. H. GEE and " Old" GEE. Students who have completed their Carnegie units but are no longer enrolled in school should receive the accommodations documented on their last IAP. I. Test Accommodations for both Section 504 and Special Education 1. Definition Accommodation— a change in the test administration environment, timing, scheduling, presentation format, and/ or method of response to the assessment. 2. Purpose of Accommodations. Test accommodations are provided to minimize the effects of a disability to ensure that a student can demonstrate the degree of achievement he or she actually possesses. Not all students with disabilities will need test accommodations, but many will need them to provide a valid and accurate measure of their abilities. The goal in using accommodations is to give students with disabilities an equal opportunity in assessment, not to give students with disabilities an unfair advantage over other students or to subvert or invalidate the purpose of the tests. The accommodation should allow the test score to reflect the student's proficiency in the area tested without the interference of his or her disability. 3. General Guidelines a. Test accommodations should not be different from, or in addition to, the accommodations provided in the classroom during instruction and assessment and as indicated on the student's IEP or Section 504 IAP. According to the 1997 amendments to IDEA, accommodations for administration of general statewide and districtwide assessments must be based on each student's needs, as documented in the student's IEP. If an accommodation, even an accommodation listed on a student's IEP or IAP, is not provided in classroom instruction or assessment, it is inappropriate to provide that accommodation during testing. EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 88 b. Selection of appropriate test accommodations should be based on a review of a student's current instructional and classroom assessment accommodations and a clear understanding of the test format and what it measures. This information should determine which accommodations enable the student to demonstrate best what he or she knows and can do. c. The accommodations must never compromise the purpose of the test. For example, a test that measures reading comprehension cannot be read aloud to a student. To do so would destroy the purpose of the test, which is to measure reading comprehension. d. Individual or small group administration must be used if the accommodations will interfere with the testing of other students, e. g., tests read aloud. e. All provided accommodations must be marked on student answer documents as instructed in the appropriate test manual. f. Accommodations must not compromise test security or confidentiality. Any assistance in test administration must not give away the answers. All conditions that pertain to test security and return of test materials after the test is administered apply to tests that are administered with accommodations. All test manual instructions relating to handling nontraditional secure materials for accommodations must be followed precisely. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 7, R. S. 17: 24 et seq., R. S. 17: 391- 400, R. S. 17: 1941 et seq., R. S. 17: 397, R. S. 17: 1946, and R. S. 17: 1947.1. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1560 ( July 2005), amended LR 32: 239 ( February 2006), LR 33: 262 ( February 2007), LR 38: 37 ( January 2012). § 3306. Approved Accommodations for Special Education and Section 504 Students A. The following accommodations, if used in classroom instruction and assessment and specified on a student's IEP or IAP may be used for testing. 1. Braille a. Braille editions of the test are provided for students who are proficient in this mode of access to written material. The regular print edition may be modified in braille. Supplementary test administration instructions and manipulatives are provided as needed. All responses must be transferred to the scorable answer document. 2. Large Print a. Large- print editions may be used by students who use large print as an accommodation in classroom instruction and assessment. Large- print editions contain all test items that are in the regular edition. Essentially the large- print edition is an enlarged version of the regular- print edition, though the layout may vary slightly so as not to make the document more difficult for a student to use. All responses must be transferred to the scorable answer document. 3. Answers Recorded a. If a student is unable due to his/ her disability to write, provisions the test administrator must record the student's answers on the scorable answer document. Scribes and others supporting a student's test taking must be neutral in responding to the student during test administration. Assistance in test administration must not give away the answers. The student's responses must accurately represent the student's own choices. If a scribe is used for a writing topic, the scribe must write exactly what the student dictates without punctuation or capitalization. The student then must edit what the scribe wrote and provide punctuation and capitalization or any other changes. 4. Assistive Technology a. Assistive technology can include, but is not limited to a: i. computer; ii. tape recorder; iii. calculator; iv. abacus; v. grip for a pencil; vi. visual magnification device; vii. communication device; viii. mask or marker to maintain place; ix. speech synthesizer; and x. electronic reader. 5. Extended Time/ Adjusted Time a. Every student must be given extended or sufficient time to respond to every test item. Time may be adjusted for certain students, such as those who have short attention spans or who may be unable to concentrate for long periods of time on a given task. The test administration time may have to be altered considerably to allow for intermittent short breaks during the testing period, or it may be determined appropriate to administer the test in a number of short sessions. Testing may also be stopped and continued at a later time if a student's behavior interferes with testing. The elapsed time must be documented and the test administrator must closely monitor that test security is maintained. The time of day the test is administered may also be adjusted to a time more beneficial to the student. All sessions, however, must be completed within the specified test administration dates, including makeup sessions. 6. Communication Assistance a. A test administrator who is fluent in the cuing or signing modality routinely used by a student should be available to repeat or clarify directions and sign portions of the test if warranted by the student's reading level as documented on the IEP or IAP. b. No passages, questions, or distractors ( multiple choices) of any English language arts test that measures Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 89 dministrative Code April 2015 reading comprehension may be signed or cued. Such tests include the Reading and Responding session of LEAP, GEE, and LAA 2, Reading, Part 2 of iLEAP grades 3, 5, 6, and 7, Reading Comprehension of iLEAP grade 9 and the “ old” GEE, Reading session of ELDA, and any others developed to measure this skill. Directions only to these sessions may be signed or cued. When signing or cueing, the test administrator must exercise caution to avoid providing answers. It is a breach of test security to provide signs or cues that convey answers. 7. Transferred Answers a. Student responses that are recorded in any format other than on the standard answer document must be transferred by the test administrator precisely as instructed in the appropriate test manual. Such formats include braille, large print, oral responses, typewritten responses, computer responses, and any other responses recorded with the assistance of mechanical or technological devices. Student responses not transferred will not be scored. If both a student's and a test administrator's handwriting appear on an answer document, only the student's writing will be scored. 8. Individual/ Small Group Administration a. Tests may be administered to a small group ( maximum, eight students) or to an individual requiring more attention than can be provided in a larger classroom. If other selected accommodations affect the standard administration of the test ( e. g., extended time on a timed test, tests read aloud), individual or small group administration must be used. 9. Tests Read Aloud a. Students may be allowed to have portions of the tests read to them, with the exception of portions designed to measure reading comprehension, which are clearly designated in the Test Administration Manuals. No passages, questions, or distractors ( multiple choices) of any English language arts assessment that measures reading comprehension may be read aloud. Such tests include the Reading and Responding session of LEAP, GEE, and LAA 2, Reading, Part 2 of iLEAP grades 3, 5, 6, and 7, Reading Comprehension of iLEAP grade 9 and the " old" GEE, Reading session of ELDA, and any others developed to measure this skill. Directions only to these sessions may be signed or cued. When signing or cueing, the test administrator must exercise caution to avoid providing answers. It is a breach of test security to provide signs or cues that convey answers. 10. Other a. Any necessary accommodations may be used, but they must be decided by the IEP team or Section 504 committee and listed on the student's IEP or IAP. The accommodation must not invalidate the meaning of the test score or the purpose of the test. Examples of other accommodations include highlighting the task or verbs in the directions on the test or assisting the student in tracking the test items. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 7, R. S. 17: 24 et seq., R. S. 17: 391- 400, R. S. 17: 1941 et seq., R. S. 17: 397, R. S. 17: 1946, and R. S. 17: 1947.1. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 263 ( February 2007), LR 33: 1010 ( June 2007). § 3307. Limited English Proficient Students A. All LEP students must participate in statewide assessments. LEP students qualify; however, for accommodations provided they are used in the students' regular classroom instruction and assessment. Test accommodations must not be different from or in addition to the accommodations provided in the classroom during instruction and assessment and must not compromise test security or confidentiality. B. Limited English Proficient Student― an individual: 1. who is aged 3 through 21; 2. who is enrolled or preparing to enroll in an elementary school or secondary school; 3. who was not born in the United States or whose native language is a language other than English; 4. who is a Native American or Alaska Native or who is a native resident of the outlying areas and comes from an environment where a language other than English has had significant impact on such individual's level of English language proficiency; or 5. who is migratory, whose native language is a language other than English, and who comes from an environment where a language other than English is dominant; and 6. whose difficulties in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language may be sufficient to deny the individual: a. the ability to meet the state's proficient level of achievement on state assessments described in Section 1111( b)( 3); b. the ability to successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English; or c. the opportunity to participate in society ( PL- 10710, Title IX, Sec. 9101[ 25]. C. Approved Accommodations for LEP Students 1. The following accommodations are to be provided for LEP students participating in the LEAP, GEE, iLEAP, LAA 2, and EOC assessments. a. Extended Time/ Adjusted Time. Every student must be given extended or sufficient time to respond to every test item. Time may be adjusted for certain students, such as those who have short attention spans or those who may be unable to concentrate for long periods of time on a given task. The test administration time may have to be altered considerably to allow for intermittent short breaks during the testing period, or it may be determined appropriate to administer the test in a number of short EDUCATION Louisiana Administrative Code April 2015 90 sessions. Testing may also be stopped and continued at a later time if a student's behavior interferes with testing. The elapsed time must be documented and the test administrator must closely monitor that test security is maintained. All sessions, however, must be completed within the specified test administration dates, including makeup sessions. b. Individual/ Small Group Administration. Tests may be administered to a small group ( maximum, eight students) or to an individual requiring more attention than can be provided in a larger classroom. If other selected accommodations affect the standard administration of the test ( e. g., extended time on a timed test, tests read aloud), individual or small group administration must be used. c. Provision of English/ Native Language Word- to- Word Dictionary ( No Definitions). LEP students may use either a standard or an electronic English/ native language word- to- word dictionary, without definitions, on all sessions of the test. On the written composition sessions of the tests, all LEP students may use an English/ native language word- to- word dictionary with definitions; this is not an accommodation. d. Tests Read Aloud. Students may be allowed to have portions of the tests read to them, with the exception of portions designed to measure reading comprehension, which are clearly designated in the Test Administration Manuals. No passages, questions, or distractors ( multiple choices) of any English language arts assessment that measures reading comprehension may be read aloud. Such tests include the Reading and Responding session of LEAP, GEE, and LAA 2, Reading, Part 2 of iLEAP grades 3, 5, 6, and 7, Reading Comprehension of iLEAP grade 9 and the “ old” GEE, and any others developed to measure this skill. Directions only to these sessions may be signed or cued. When signing or cueing, the test administrator must exercise caution to avoid providing answers. It is a breach of test security to provide signs or cues that convey answers. e. Test Administered by ESL Teacher or by Individual Providing Language Services. Familiarity with the speech patterns of the ESL teacher or individual providing language services may assist the student in understanding the test directions or the portions read aloud if the student receives the accommodation Tests Read Aloud. D. Spanish language versions of math state assessments are provided for limited English proficient ( LEP) students in grades 3 through 8. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 1941 et seq., and R. S. 17: 24.4( F)( 3). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1562 ( July 2005), amended by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 32: 240 ( February 2006), LR 33: 264 ( February 2007), LR 33: 1010 ( June 2007), LR 36: 983 ( May 2010), LR 37: 821 ( March 2011), LR 41: 616 ( April 2015). Chapter 35. Assessment of Students in Special Circumstances § 3501. Approved Home Study Program Students A. Fourth grade students from state- approved home study programs who are seeking to enroll in grade 5 must meet promotion standards on the grade 4 LEAP English Language Arts or the Mathematics test enroll in grade 5. B. Eighth grade students from state- approved home study programs who are seeking to enroll in grade 9 must meet promotion standards on the grade 8 LEAP English Language Arts or the Mathematics test enroll in grade 9. C. Students from state- approved home study programs have the option of taking the grades 4 and 8 LEAP Science and Social Studies tests. D. Students from state- approved home study programs may take the iLEAP tests in grades 3, 5, 6, and 7. E. Approved home study program students shall take the test which is designated for the enrolled grade. F. A fee of up to $ 35, which covers actual costs of administering, scoring, and reporting the results of statewide assessment, may be charged. For students testing to enter the public school system, this fee shall be refunded upon the student’s enrollment in that public school system the semester immediately following testing. The DTC shall return results to parents when results are returned to the public schools. G. Students enrolled in state- approved home study programs or non- public/ non- scholarship schools are not eligible to participate in LAA 1, LAA 2, ELDA, EOC, or the state administration of EXPLORE, PLAN, WorkKeys or ACT. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17.236.1- 17.236.2, R. S. 17: 6( A)( 10)( 11)( 15), R. S. 17: 10, R. S. 17: 22( 6), R. S. 17: 391.1- 17.391.10, and R. S. 17: 411. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1563 ( July 2005), amended by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 32: 240 ( February 2006), LR 33: 264 ( February 2007), LR 36: 983 ( May 2010), LR 37: 821 ( March 2011), LR 39: 1430 ( June 2013), LR 40: 1320 ( July 2014), LR 40: 2515 ( December 2014). § 3503. Homebound Students A. Homebound students shall be administered the appropriate assessment for their enrolled grade. The test administrator must issue the test booklet and answer document each day and return the testing materials to the enrolled school daily. The test administrator must receive training in security and test administration procedures and sign a security oath. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1563 ( July 2005). Title 28, Part CXI Louisiana A 91 dministrative Code April 2015 § 3505. Foreign Exchange Students A. Foreign exchange students shall take the appropriate assessment for their enrolled grade during the scheduled assessment period. B. If foreign exchange students are screened and determined to be limited English proficient, they may qualify for test accommodations provided they are used in the student’s regular classroom instruction and assessment. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 151.3 and R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1563 ( July 2005), amended LR 34: 2557 ( December 2008), repromulgated LR 35: 62 ( January 2009), LR 38: 37 ( January 2012). § 3507. Office of Juvenile Justice A. Students enrolled in grades 3 through 11 who are under the supervision of correctional facilities shall take the appropriate assessment for their enrolled grade. B. If a student is 18 years of age by March 1, and: 1. is pursuing a high school diploma, he/ she shall test; and 2. is not pursuing a high school diploma, he/ she does not need to test. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 151.3 and R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 31: 1563 ( July 2005), amended LR 33: 2043 ( October 2007). § 3509. Expelled Students A. If a student is expelled from school and is not enrolled in any type of alternative program or receiving any services from the school district, the parent/ legal guardian may make a timely request that the student be tested and the school district shall make arrangements to test the student. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 151.3 and R. S. 17: 24. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 33: 264 ( February 2007). § 3511. Migrant Students A. Migrant students shall take the appropriate assessment for their enrolled grade during the scheduled assessment period. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R. S. 17: 151.3 and R. S. 17: 24.4. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Department of Education, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 37: 821 ( March 2011).